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By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,Sun Pop Music Critic | March 20, 1994
When Bonnie Raitt's album "Nick of Time" swept the Grammy Awards in 1989, the consensus was that her victory marked a turning point for her generation. No longer would it be necessary for baby boomers to feign youthfulness in order to maintain their grip on pop music relevance, for as Raitt's album surged past platinum, songs about adult affairs seemed as appropriate to the Top 40 as puppy love ever had.There was nothing new about this approach for Raitt, of course. Well-schooled in the blues, a style whose practitioners have always seen their songs as being by and for grown-ups, she was used to singing about real-life people in real-life situations.
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By Mikael Wood | July 22, 2008
Miley Cyrus Breakout Sun grade: B- On the second studio album she's released under her own name (as opposed to that of Hannah Montana, her Disney Channel alter ego), 15-year-old Miley Cyrus offers up a rendition of Cyndi Lauper's "Girls Just Wanna Have Fun" that says more about Cyrus' real-world existence as an overworked young media star than she (or her handlers) probably intended. On its surface, the song describes the simple desire to let loose with one's friends; in the first verse, the singer "come[s]
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By Scott Benarde and Scott Benarde,Cox News Service | June 27, 1991
SUCCESS has not changed or spoiled singer-guitarist Bonnie Raitt. Last year Raitt won four Grammys -- three for her 1989 album "Nick of Time." Raitt's follow-up album, "Luck of the Draw" (Capitol Records), released today, is a close cousin in mood and style to "Nick of Time."Raitt wisely hasn't tried to fix what ain't broke; her music remains firmly rooted in Delta blues and Southern rhythm and blues. She's used the same producer, Don Was, and some of the same backup musicians and songwriters who helped make "Nick of Time" a hit that sold 3 million copies, resulting in a stellar career comeback.
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December 1, 2005
Bonnie Raitt and Marc Broussard -- Constitution Hall / Bluesy rock legend Bonnie Raitt and soulful pop upstart Marc Broussard storm through Constitution Hall, 18th and D streets N.W. in Washington, Tuesday night at 8. Tickets are $45 and are available through Ticketmaster by calling 410-547-SEAT or visiting ticket master.com. Kev Brown -- 9:30 Club / Heady underground hip-hop is the focus as the Diamond District featuring the Kev Brown Family and W. Ellington Felton headline the 9:30 Club, 815 V St. N.W. in Washington, tomorrow night at 9. Tickets are $15. For more information, visit 930.com.
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By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,Sun Pop Music Critic | August 19, 1991
At first glance, Saturday night's lineup at the Merriweather Post Pavilion probably looked like some sort of rock and roll revival show. At one end of the bill was Chris Isaak, whose gold-lame suit and Elvis Presley pompadour seem straight out of the '50s; at the other was Bonnie Raitt, a singer and slide guitarist whose roots remain firmly grounded in pre-rock blues and R&B.Yet for all their traditionalist trappings, Raitt and Isaak are thoroughly modern...
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By J. D. Considine and J. D. Considine,Pop Music Critic | February 26, 1992
It may not have been an unforgettable evening, but last night's Grammy Awards broadcast was certainly an "Unforgettable" evening. That is, Natalie Cole's "Unforgettable" -- album recorded in tribute to the music of her father, the late Nat "King" Cole -- was the evening's runaway winner.Not only did the single, a duet between deceased father and live daughter, walk away with the Record of the Year and Song of the Year, but the project also landed Album of the Year and a host of lesser honors, including Best Traditional Pop Performance, Best Instrumental Arrangement Accompanying Vocal(s)
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September 24, 1997
The story on the No Nukes concerts in yesterday's Today section gave incorrect days and venue for the shows. They are tonight(Bonnie Raitt, the Indigo Girls and John Trudell) and tomorrow (Bonnie Raitt, Mary Chapin Carpenter and John Trudell) at the Warner Theatre, 13th Street (between E and F streets) N.W., Washington. Both shows are at 7: 30 p.m. Call 410-481-7328 for tickets or 202-783-4000 for information.ZTCPub Date: 9/24/97
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By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,SUN POP MUSIC CRITIC | September 23, 1997
The story on the No Nukes concerts in yesterday's Today section gave incorrect days and venue for the shows. They are tonight(Bonnie Raitt, the Indigo Girls and John Trudell) and tomorrow (Bonnie Raitt, Mary Chapin Carpenter and John Trudell) at the Warner Theatre, 13th Street (between E and F streets) N.W., Washington. Both shows are at 7: 30 p.m. Call 410-481-7328 for tickets or 202-783-4000 for information.Some folks, upon hearing that Bonnie Raitt, the Indigo Girls TC and Mary Chapin Carpenter would be playing a series of No Nukes benefit concerts in Washington this week, probably thought to themselves: "Cool.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 1, 2005
Bonnie Raitt and Marc Broussard -- Constitution Hall / Bluesy rock legend Bonnie Raitt and soulful pop upstart Marc Broussard storm through Constitution Hall, 18th and D streets N.W. in Washington, Tuesday night at 8. Tickets are $45 and are available through Ticketmaster by calling 410-547-SEAT or visiting ticket master.com. Kev Brown -- 9:30 Club / Heady underground hip-hop is the focus as the Diamond District featuring the Kev Brown Family and W. Ellington Felton headline the 9:30 Club, 815 V St. N.W. in Washington, tomorrow night at 9. Tickets are $15. For more information, visit 930.com.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J.D. Considine | December 2, 1999
Over the past 30 years, NRBQ has gone from being the New Rhythm & Blues Quintet to a quirky, roots-rocking quartet, shedding two guitarists, a singer and a horn section along the way. The group has never had much luck on the charts -- 1974's "Get That Gasoline Blues" was the closest NRBQ has gotten to having a hit, and that only made it to No. 70 -- yet it counts such luminaries among its fans as Paul McCartney, R.E.M.. Bonnie Raitt and Keith Richards. Heck, bassist Joey Spampinato was in the running to replace Bill Wyman in the Rolling Stones.
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By Michael James and Michael James,Sun Staff | February 28, 2000
Imagine walking into a music store, handing over a list of hundreds of your favorite songs, and leaving with all of them -- without paying a cent. That's what tens of thousands of college students around the country are doing -- only they go to the Internet instead of Sam Goody. It's all possible because of Napster, a song-trading program that has the music industry in an uproar over what it calls "a giant online pirate bazaar." The Recording Industry Association of America (RIAA) has filed a copyright infringement lawsuit against Napster's publisher, charging that the California company has provided the ultimate burglary tool for music thieves.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J.D. Considine | December 2, 1999
Over the past 30 years, NRBQ has gone from being the New Rhythm & Blues Quintet to a quirky, roots-rocking quartet, shedding two guitarists, a singer and a horn section along the way. The group has never had much luck on the charts -- 1974's "Get That Gasoline Blues" was the closest NRBQ has gotten to having a hit, and that only made it to No. 70 -- yet it counts such luminaries among its fans as Paul McCartney, R.E.M.. Bonnie Raitt and Keith Richards. Heck, bassist Joey Spampinato was in the running to replace Bill Wyman in the Rolling Stones.
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By Karin Remesch | September 2, 1999
BALPEXBuy, sell, trade and examine stamps and other items of philatelic interest this weekend at BALPEX '99, a stamp show sponsored by the Baltimore Philatelic Society at the Marriott, Hunt Valley Inn, Shawan Road at Interstate 83. Exhibitors from around the world will display rare collections. An auction, seminars and activities for junior collectors are also part of the annual event. This year's souvenir cachet cover of a 1915 railroad car reflects Baltimore's long association with rail transportation.
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By Steve Andrulonis Soundtrack Various Artists J.D. Considine | October 1, 1998
Ethel EnnisIf Women Ruled the World (Savoy Jazz 9915)Jazz singing works by different rules from rock or R&B. With rock, melody is a singer's foremost concern, followed by the desire to convey a depth of feeling; with R&B, the emotional component is a bit more important, as is a certain vocal virtuosity, but as with rock, putting the tune across still comes first.Jazz singing, by contrast, is less about the song than what the singer can do with it. Just as a jazz instrumentalist will use the elements of harmony and melody to construct an improvisation, the jazz singer is out to reinvent the material, turning each performance into a song of self.
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By J. D. Considine | April 23, 1998
* = poor** = fair*** = good**** = excellentBonnie RaittFundamental (Capitol 56397)Bonnie Raitt may have made her name on the blues, but it's rhythm that earned her an audience.No matter how much her slide guitar and sweet, sad voice may bring to a song, Raitt's biggest hits have always ridden a sassy, stylized R&B groove. It isn't just that her fans prefer a bit of rhythm with their blues; a strong pulse brings out the best in Raitt's lithe, laid-back phrasing, energizing the melody and emphasizing the lyric's emotional undercurrent.
FEATURES
September 24, 1997
The story on the No Nukes concerts in yesterday's Today section gave incorrect days and venue for the shows. They are tonight(Bonnie Raitt, the Indigo Girls and John Trudell) and tomorrow (Bonnie Raitt, Mary Chapin Carpenter and John Trudell) at the Warner Theatre, 13th Street (between E and F streets) N.W., Washington. Both shows are at 7: 30 p.m. Call 410-481-7328 for tickets or 202-783-4000 for information.ZTCPub Date: 9/24/97
ENTERTAINMENT
By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,Sun Pop Music Critic | July 5, 1991
LUCK OF THE DRAWBonnie Raitt (Capitol 96111)After getting married, winning a bunch of Grammys and enjoying the comeback of a lifetime with her last album, some fans may wonder what Bonnie Raitt would have to be blue about these days. Of course, it has never been true that only unhappy people sing the blues, but those needing proof need look no further than Raitt's new album, "Luck of the Draw." Like "Nick of Time," Raitt's "Luck" leaves little to chance; the musicians are first-rate, the songs top-drawer, and the production is smooth without ever seeming slick.
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By Gary Graff and Gary Graff,Knight-Ridder News Service | July 29, 1994
When Bonnie Raitt started making records in 1971, she stepped into rare territory.Female blues singers were common, but female blues guitarists were practically unheard of.Slide guitar, Ms. Raitt's specialty, was becoming a lost art, its smooth, round effect usurped by the scream and crank of rock 'n' roll players at the time.But nowadays there's a legion of female rockers strapping on guitars. And even slide is making a comeback."I hear plenty of slide on TV commercials for beer and trucks," Ms. Raitt, 44, says with a chuckle.
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By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,SUN POP MUSIC CRITIC | September 23, 1997
The story on the No Nukes concerts in yesterday's Today section gave incorrect days and venue for the shows. They are tonight(Bonnie Raitt, the Indigo Girls and John Trudell) and tomorrow (Bonnie Raitt, Mary Chapin Carpenter and John Trudell) at the Warner Theatre, 13th Street (between E and F streets) N.W., Washington. Both shows are at 7: 30 p.m. Call 410-481-7328 for tickets or 202-783-4000 for information.Some folks, upon hearing that Bonnie Raitt, the Indigo Girls TC and Mary Chapin Carpenter would be playing a series of No Nukes benefit concerts in Washington this week, probably thought to themselves: "Cool.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J.D. Considine | August 8, 1996
Tom Petty and the HeartbreakersSongs and Music from the Motion Picture 'She's the One' (Warner Bros. 46285)Few rockers have as much fun with form as Tom Petty and the Heartbreakers do. On "Songs and Music From the Motion Picture 'She's the One,' " Petty and the boys do a bit of everything, from dramatic, wide-screen story-songs ("Grew Up Fast") to droll, Dylanesque ravers ("Zero From Outer Space") to the chiming, Byrds-influenced pop we normally associate with him ("California"). Heck, they even take a stab at lounge jazz on one track (the brief, moody instrumental "Airport")
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