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Bonnie And Clyde

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NEWS
By David R. Boldt | August 4, 1993
THE current society-wide awakening to the pernicious effects of what Tom Wolfe has termed "pornoviolence" on television and in the movies raises a number of questions, such as, "What took us so long?"And, "Where did we go wrong?"I have a theory on the latter that may, in turn, possibly shed some light on the former. Specifically, I think we went wrong with the release of "Bonnie and Clyde" 26 years ago, in August of 1967.I don't have a lot of convincing research to back this up. Certainly I had no clear realization when it first came out that "Bonnie and Clyde" was the first in a wave of movies that came to the screen immediately after Hollywood's self-policing apparatus was dismantled in 1966, intent on exploring the outer reaches of the envelope in terms of depicting violence and sex.And I had no idea that 1967 would be the year cited by chroniclers of Hollywood as the year in which the movie industry lost its hold on the American mass audience.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Sragow, The Baltimore Sun | July 8, 2010
"Mickey One" is a runaway movie and a wild curiosity. It's a gorgeous, infuriating American art film from an era when our best moviemakers tried to take the pulse of the nation rather than merely guess the emotional weight of their next-door neighbors. It's weirdly exhilarating to see it on the same screen at the Charles where "mumblecore" and other minimalist aesthetics sometimes rule. Instead of kitchen-sink comedy-drama, it gives us everything- including -the-kitchen-sink comedy-drama.
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NEWS
June 23, 2007
Doris Edwards, 96 Police officer's widow Doris Edwards, who is believed to be among the last surviving widows of nine policemen killed during Bonnie and Clyde's notorious crime spree in the 1930s, has died. The Dallas County, Texas, medical examiner's office said Mrs. Edwards died June 10. Her husband was fatally shot while approaching the famed outlaws' parked car near Fort Worth, Texas, in 1934. Edwin "E.B." Wheeler was a highway patrolman when he and another officer investigated a car parked on a side road.
NEWS
June 23, 2007
Doris Edwards, 96 Police officer's widow Doris Edwards, who is believed to be among the last surviving widows of nine policemen killed during Bonnie and Clyde's notorious crime spree in the 1930s, has died. The Dallas County, Texas, medical examiner's office said Mrs. Edwards died June 10. Her husband was fatally shot while approaching the famed outlaws' parked car near Fort Worth, Texas, in 1934. Edwin "E.B." Wheeler was a highway patrolman when he and another officer investigated a car parked on a side road.
NEWS
July 9, 1995
Lea Johnson, 98, a restaurateur who appeared on the "Tonight Show" and attracted customers like Huey Long and Bonnie and Clyde to Lea's Lunchroom, died Thursday in Lecompte, La. Johnson founded the restaurant in 1928. He was on Johnny Carson's show in 1989.
NEWS
June 29, 2003
David Newman, 66, an Academy Award-nominated screenwriter whose films included Bonnie and Clyde and the Superman movies, died in New York City on Thursday, five days after suffering a stroke. Mr. Newman, who began his career as an editor at Esquire magazine, penned screenplays for more than a dozen films, sometimes with his wife, Leslie Newman, other times with Robert Benton, director of Kramer vs. Kramer. Mr. Benton and Mr. Newman first came to prominence when they wrote the screenplay for Bonnie and Clyde, the 1967 film starring Warren Beatty and Faye Dunaway.
SPORTS
By Kent Baker and Kent Baker,Staff Writer | October 31, 1992
LAUREL -- The big action is in Florida today, but Laurel offers the $60,000 Challedon Handicap as its live feature beforehand to prep local horseplayers for the Breeders' Cup championships.Defending champion Flaming Emperor, who won the 1991 Challedon when Smart Alec was disqualified, heads a field of eight Maryland-breds going seven furlongs in the stakes.Flaming Emperor tuned up by breezing three furlongs in an eye-popping 34 3/5 last Saturday at Bowie, indicating a razor sharpness.The 6-year-old gelding comes into the race off a rallying second to Dontcloseyoureyes in the Maryland City Handicap three weeks ago.It was a similar performance to last year's Challedon, when he had not raced in four months because of an injury to his suspensory ligament.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Film Critic | March 26, 1993
There are three possibilities. Either the Charles likes guns, it likes young woman directors or it likes James LeGros. What else explains the congruence this weekend of two films that have those three elements in common?"
FEATURES
By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,Sun staff | April 26, 1998
The cinema today is in a crisis. Brave the local multiplex. The 30,000 movie screens currently aglow in America have been colonized by over-budgeted spectacles, treacly melodramas, feel-good smarmedies, middling vehicles for superannuated action heroes.Themes, faces and soundtracks vary, but they all share essential qualities: disposability, middlebrow contempt for intellect and the pots of money spent to make and incessantly hype them. "Titanic" ($200 million to make, $40 million to market)
NEWS
By Russell Baker | May 4, 1995
CONTRARY TO what you may have concluded from television coverage of Oklahoma City, violence has always been perfectly at home in the American "heartland."There has been a lot of malarkey about the innocence of this "heartland," proving perhaps that a tyrannical two-coast mentality has affected the media brain. Or perhaps showing that our formal news media have been infected by tabloid journalism and talk radio with their exhilarating contempt for fact.My own hunch is less cosmic in scope.
NEWS
June 29, 2003
David Newman, 66, an Academy Award-nominated screenwriter whose films included Bonnie and Clyde and the Superman movies, died in New York City on Thursday, five days after suffering a stroke. Mr. Newman, who began his career as an editor at Esquire magazine, penned screenplays for more than a dozen films, sometimes with his wife, Leslie Newman, other times with Robert Benton, director of Kramer vs. Kramer. Mr. Benton and Mr. Newman first came to prominence when they wrote the screenplay for Bonnie and Clyde, the 1967 film starring Warren Beatty and Faye Dunaway.
TOPIC
By Frank Pierson and Frank Pierson,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 1, 2003
Hollywood was once a small company town, where everybody knew everybody, and if you dropped your pants at a party or punched a reporter or danced with a prostitute in the parking lot, it wasn't on Entertainment Tonight tonight. It was even hard to get arrested. Every studio had a publicity department that paid the Los Angeles cops to stay away from show business people. The police didn't arrest movie people - they drove them home. We all went down to the film factories every day (at Warner Bros.
FEATURES
By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,Sun staff | April 26, 1998
The cinema today is in a crisis. Brave the local multiplex. The 30,000 movie screens currently aglow in America have been colonized by over-budgeted spectacles, treacly melodramas, feel-good smarmedies, middling vehicles for superannuated action heroes.Themes, faces and soundtracks vary, but they all share essential qualities: disposability, middlebrow contempt for intellect and the pots of money spent to make and incessantly hype them. "Titanic" ($200 million to make, $40 million to market)
NEWS
July 9, 1995
Lea Johnson, 98, a restaurateur who appeared on the "Tonight Show" and attracted customers like Huey Long and Bonnie and Clyde to Lea's Lunchroom, died Thursday in Lecompte, La. Johnson founded the restaurant in 1928. He was on Johnny Carson's show in 1989.
NEWS
By Russell Baker | May 4, 1995
CONTRARY TO what you may have concluded from television coverage of Oklahoma City, violence has always been perfectly at home in the American "heartland."There has been a lot of malarkey about the innocence of this "heartland," proving perhaps that a tyrannical two-coast mentality has affected the media brain. Or perhaps showing that our formal news media have been infected by tabloid journalism and talk radio with their exhilarating contempt for fact.My own hunch is less cosmic in scope.
NEWS
By David R. Boldt | August 4, 1993
THE current society-wide awakening to the pernicious effects of what Tom Wolfe has termed "pornoviolence" on television and in the movies raises a number of questions, such as, "What took us so long?"And, "Where did we go wrong?"I have a theory on the latter that may, in turn, possibly shed some light on the former. Specifically, I think we went wrong with the release of "Bonnie and Clyde" 26 years ago, in August of 1967.I don't have a lot of convincing research to back this up. Certainly I had no clear realization when it first came out that "Bonnie and Clyde" was the first in a wave of movies that came to the screen immediately after Hollywood's self-policing apparatus was dismantled in 1966, intent on exploring the outer reaches of the envelope in terms of depicting violence and sex.And I had no idea that 1967 would be the year cited by chroniclers of Hollywood as the year in which the movie industry lost its hold on the American mass audience.
TOPIC
By Frank Pierson and Frank Pierson,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 1, 2003
Hollywood was once a small company town, where everybody knew everybody, and if you dropped your pants at a party or punched a reporter or danced with a prostitute in the parking lot, it wasn't on Entertainment Tonight tonight. It was even hard to get arrested. Every studio had a publicity department that paid the Los Angeles cops to stay away from show business people. The police didn't arrest movie people - they drove them home. We all went down to the film factories every day (at Warner Bros.
NEWS
By Elise Armacost | April 12, 1992
Carole Colbert Sales shouldn't have bounced those grocery checks. She should have returned her rented videotapes on time. And she should have appeared in court to take responsibility for her errors.But does she really belong on a list of Anne Arundel's "Most Wanted" criminals?Since she appeared on the list last month, Sales has been stoppedin the checkout lines at grocery stores by clerks who recognized herand chased, on foot, through Glen Burnie by police."I've had a horrible week," said Sales, "hiding out" in her sister's kitchen in Lansdowne shortly after the chase.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Film Critic | March 26, 1993
There are three possibilities. Either the Charles likes guns, it likes young woman directors or it likes James LeGros. What else explains the congruence this weekend of two films that have those three elements in common?"
SPORTS
By Kent Baker and Kent Baker,Staff Writer | October 31, 1992
LAUREL -- The big action is in Florida today, but Laurel offers the $60,000 Challedon Handicap as its live feature beforehand to prep local horseplayers for the Breeders' Cup championships.Defending champion Flaming Emperor, who won the 1991 Challedon when Smart Alec was disqualified, heads a field of eight Maryland-breds going seven furlongs in the stakes.Flaming Emperor tuned up by breezing three furlongs in an eye-popping 34 3/5 last Saturday at Bowie, indicating a razor sharpness.The 6-year-old gelding comes into the race off a rallying second to Dontcloseyoureyes in the Maryland City Handicap three weeks ago.It was a similar performance to last year's Challedon, when he had not raced in four months because of an injury to his suspensory ligament.
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