Advertisement
HomeCollectionsBonn
IN THE NEWS

Bonn

FIND MORE STORIES ABOUT:
FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
May 16, 1991
Berlin is already the official, ceremonial and historic capital of united Germany. The question now is whether it will become the actual seat of government, with the chancellor's office and most federal ministries moving from Bonn, or whether Bonn will remain the seat of real political power.As the Germans debate this problem with their usual angst, one calumny against Berlin should be put to rest: The idea that Hitler's brief association with the grand old city on the Spree somehow makes it a distasteful symbol and an unseemly capital.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
July 30, 2005
On July 29, 2005, JOYCE D. PHARIS (nee Rottman); beloved wife of Richard L. Pharis, Sr.; loving mother of John Bonn, Janet Clark, Karen Foster and Richard L. Pharis, Jr.; cherished "mom-mom" of Richard Ray, Jr. and Kayla Clark, Krystle Bonn, Allen and Bradley Foster; great-grandmother of three great-grandchildren; dear sister of Lillian Mae Rottman Wilson. Also survived by seven nieces and nephews and many other loving relatives. Family and friends may call at the family owned AMBROSE FUNERAL HOME, INC., 1328 Sulphur Spring Road, Arbutus, on Saturday from 7 to 9 P.M. and Sunday 9 to 11 A.M., where funeral services will be held on Sunday 11 A.M. Interment to immediately follow services in the Meadowridge Memorial Park, Elkridge.
Advertisement
NEWS
September 12, 1990
President Bush spoke before a Congress last night that is remarkably united behind his military stand in the Persian Gulf but restive about the degree of support being offered by key allies -- especially West Germany and Japan. Before the president addressed a joint session of the House and Senate, several Republicans voiced bitter complaints aimed at Bonn and Tokyo. After his speech, House majority leader Richard Gephardt made this the central theme of an otherwise supportive Democratic response.
SPORTS
By Sandra McKee and Sandra McKee,SUN STAFF | April 2, 2004
Blast fan Don Bonn is easy to pick out of the crowd at 1st Mariner Arena. He's the one with the megaphone in his hand and the soccer-ball hat on his head. He has season tickets at both ends of the field, seats he uses every game so he can change ends after each quarter and try to distract opposing players on the field. Bonn, 53, a real estate salesman, was simply expressing his opinion in late December when he wrote an e-mail to Cleveland Force president and general manager Paul Garofolo after the team hired coach Omid Namazi.
NEWS
By Ian Johnson and Ian Johnson,Special to The Sun | October 16, 1990
BERLIN -- Through either a "lousy trick" or "pure reason," this city may be denied what some people feel is its birthright: being the capital of a united Germany.True enough, the state treaty that united East and West Germany calls for Berlin to be the capital of the country, but the treaty divides this ceremonial function from the nitty-gritty "seat of government," the place where the top bureaucrats and politicians live, spend money and make real decisions.The united German parliament is dominated by big West German states, most of which want the former West German capital of Bonn to stay the seat of government.
NEWS
By Ian Johnson and Ian Johnson,Contributing Writer | May 10, 1992
BONN -- Ask the Economics Ministry planner about moving Germany's capital from Bonn to Berlin. He snickers."Berlin? Sure we'll move someday, but hopefully I'll be in retirement then," says the man, who is 42 years old.Although the parliament voted nearly a year ago to move from the West German "provisional" capital of Bonn to the old German capital of Berlin by 1997, most bureaucrats and politicians here reflect this official's sometime-in-the-future attitude.As...
NEWS
January 21, 1992
BONN, Germany (Reuters) -- A leading German politician called yesterday for a compromise over the creation of an ethnic German republic within newly independent Russia."
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | December 28, 1990
BONN, Germany -- It did not end the way cloak-and-dagger stories are supposed to, with briefcases exchanged on foggy bridges, or midnight dashes across nameless borders.Instead, one of the most thrilling chapters in Cold War espionage closed with a German nursery rhyme sung by a lonely, drunken spy:"All my little duckies, swimming on the pond . . . heads deep in water, tails to the sky."The bizarre shortwave broadcast from East Germany to its legion of spies around the globe that evening last May 23 hid a sobering message.
NEWS
By Gail Gibson and Gail Gibson,SUN STAFF | November 7, 2000
A 24-year Takoma Park police department veteran admitted yesterday to helping cover up unprovoked attacks, one involving a Prince George's County police dog, on two homeless burglary suspects. Sgt. Dennis Bonn pleaded guilty in U.S. District Court in Greenbelt to being an accessory after the fact in the 1995 incident. Bonn, who retired from the police force Nov. 1, also agreed to cooperate with related federal civil rights prosecutions. Two Prince George's County officers and a former Takoma Park officer face charges in the case.
NEWS
By Ian Johnson and Ian Johnson,Special to The Sun | June 17, 1991
BERLIN -- Antje Pieper is bewildered by a bitter division in her reunited country."Sometimes I think that we Germans try to make everything difficult for ourselves. We unified the country peacefully, but now are killing ourselves over where the government should be. It's ridiculous," she said.For Ms. Pieper, 26, a bookkeeper, the question of where unified Germany should locate its government is clear: Berlin. But for the 656 members of parliament who have to make the decision Thursday, the question is being treated as the most controversial decision of their careers.
NEWS
December 6, 2001
IT LOOKS too good to be true. Compromises among Afghans sometimes break down. There were five during the 1992-1996 anarchy that led to Taliban tyranny. The 28 delegates from four factions cooped up nine days in a hotel above the Rhine in Germany hammered out a 30-member provisional government to take power in Kabul for a few months. They agreed on United Nations peacekeepers to police the capital. Observers were stunned. Russia and Pakistan, powerful backers of rival factions, enthusiastically support the accord.
NEWS
November 27, 2001
CONTENTIOUS representatives of the main Afghan ethnic, political and interest groups meeting at a secluded hotel overlooking the Rhine in Germany, starting today, have all failed before. They failed their country, their people and a bemused world that would rather Afghanistan took care of its own affairs. They represent: The Northern Alliance or United Front, who after victory in 1992 plunged their country into four years of civil war, atrocities, international terrorism and tyranny against women -- leading to a popular welcome for the Taliban, who proved worse.
NEWS
By Gail Gibson and Gail Gibson,SUN STAFF | November 7, 2000
A 24-year Takoma Park police department veteran admitted yesterday to helping cover up unprovoked attacks, one involving a Prince George's County police dog, on two homeless burglary suspects. Sgt. Dennis Bonn pleaded guilty in U.S. District Court in Greenbelt to being an accessory after the fact in the 1995 incident. Bonn, who retired from the police force Nov. 1, also agreed to cooperate with related federal civil rights prosecutions. Two Prince George's County officers and a former Takoma Park officer face charges in the case.
NEWS
July 25, 1999
WEST Germany is dead. Long live Germany. Bonn, the sleepy university town on the Rhine called upon to anchor a disgraced Germany in the West, reverts to its old status after a half-century.Berlin was one of the great cities of the world -- an artistic, architectural, financial, military, sinful and imperial capital -- from 1871 to 1945. From the creation of the German Empire by Otto von Bismarck until the destruction of Adolf Hitler's Third Reich.The old Germany was more Protestant than Catholic, more Socialist than conservative, Central rather than Western European.
NEWS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | March 17, 1999
BERLIN -- Under fierce attack by political conservatives, the German government backed away yesterday from a bold plan to invite millions of foreigners to become German citizens.Instead, the government of Chancellor Gerhard Schroeder approved a watered-down version of its plan to rewrite Germany's 1913 citizenship law, which defines Germans by bloodlines rather than by residence.Under the proposal -- which is expected to be approved in parliament by May -- foreigners may apply for citizenship after living in Germany for eight years instead of the 15 required by law. Most children born in Germany will for the first time become German citizens automatically, regardless of their heritage.
NEWS
By Mark Matthews and Mark Matthews,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | December 9, 1998
WASHINGTON -- With the Cold War over for nearly a decade and much of the world lined up behind the goal of nonproliferation, the last thing you'd expect the United States and its European allies to be arguing about is nuclear weapons.But they are.On one end is Germany's new foreign minister, Joschka Fischer, who sent shock waves across the Atlantic last month by advocating a ban on being the first to use nuclear weapons in a conflict.On the other is Defense Secretary William S. Cohen, who suggested that the United States could launch a nuclear attack against a nonnuclear opponent armed with chemical or biological weapons.
NEWS
By DAN BERGER | May 2, 1991
Stop the presses! Paul Tsongas is running.The U.S. is the great power in the world and is begging its bankers in Tokyo and Bonn for lower interest so that it can go on living the fantasy a little longer.Iraq wants to sell oil and assets for such humanitarian necessities as food and medicine. You have Saddam Hussein's word on that.
NEWS
By New York Times | November 13, 1991
BONN, Germany -- The German government has outlined a proposal to tax income from interest-bearing investments.The plan is a modified reprise of a controversial withholding tax on interest income imposed and repealed in 1989. That tax caused huge capital flight and severely weakened the mark against the dollar.
NEWS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | October 5, 1998
BONN, Germany -- There is a place along the Rhine River where baseball diamonds are groomed, hamburgers sizzle on barbecues and worshipers pray inside a church that could come from the pages of a Norman Rockwell sketchbook.This is a bucolic diplomatic enclave, nicknamed "Little America," where for nearly 50 years U.S. State Department employees and their families put down roots on the southern edge of Germany's capital."This was the U.S. showing what it could do right after World War II -- the pride of the Yankees," said Mike Hoff, the housing officer.
NEWS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | September 29, 1998
BONN, Germany -- In a country with a love of fast cars and the open road, they campaigned for a highway speed limit and stiff new gasoline taxes. In a bedrock NATO nation, they called for dissolving national armies and military alliances.And now, the Greens, environmentalists and pacifists who have campaigned for decades on the streets, are poised to enter the halls of power as a junior partner in the new German government.Chancellor-in-waiting Gerhard Schroeder and his Social Democratic Party opened the mating ritual for a new governing partner yesterday, and signaled they were prepared to open talks Friday to forge a ruling coalition with the Greens.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.