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By Steve McKerrow and Steve McKerrow,Sun Staff Writer | June 8, 1995
In 1986, two Baltimore filmmakers screened a documentary )) on Maryland Public Television, "Beginning With Bong," that eloquently presented the challenges facing a severely disabled young boy. Nine years later, they update the story with a surprisingly upbeat sequel.* "Bong and Donnell" (8 p.m.-9 p.m., MPT, Channels 22, 67) -- The latest documentary from Baltimore independent filmmakers William A. Whiteford and Susan Hadary Cohen won the Best of Fest prize at the Baltimore Film Forum this year.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Wesley Case | March 10, 2011
Here’s a confession: I’m a sucker for the next big thing. When I first heard the Strokes’ “New York City Cops,” I immediately hopped on board. I gave fair shakes to the Hives, Bloc Party and even the Vines. Basically, if NME put a band on its cover, I was going to see what the fuss was about. This includes Arctic Monkeys, a personal favorite based on the strength of their filler-free debut Whatever People Say I Am, That’s What I’m Not . Alex Turner, who dates my U.K. crush Alexa Chung, was an easily loveable frontman, all Sheffield swagger and boozed up adrenaline.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Wesley Case | March 10, 2011
Here’s a confession: I’m a sucker for the next big thing. When I first heard the Strokes’ “New York City Cops,” I immediately hopped on board. I gave fair shakes to the Hives, Bloc Party and even the Vines. Basically, if NME put a band on its cover, I was going to see what the fuss was about. This includes Arctic Monkeys, a personal favorite based on the strength of their filler-free debut Whatever People Say I Am, That’s What I’m Not . Alex Turner, who dates my U.K. crush Alexa Chung, was an easily loveable frontman, all Sheffield swagger and boozed up adrenaline.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Sragow, The Baltimore Sun | September 16, 2010
Watching "Leaves of Grass," a funny, intricate pinwheel of a movie about a classics professor and his marijuana-growing twin, you get caught up in the joy that Edward Norton had playing both these roles. Norton sparks writer-director Tim Blake Nelson's whole inspired ensemble — including Nelson himself, who plays the pot farmer's partner. Making sure to cram a press call in right before he interviewed Bruce Springsteen on Tuesday at the Toronto International Film Festival, Norton said he cottoned to Nelson's script "because I thought it was very original and I laughed a lot when I read it. " It's a thinking man's — and feeling man's — " Pineapple Express.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | August 12, 1997
There are no mind-boggling special effects or white-knuckle chase scenes, but HBO's "Bong & Donnell" might just be the best buddy film you'll see this summer.It's not a movie-movie like "Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid" or "Thelma & Louise"; it's a documentary from Emmy Award-winning local filmmakers Susan Hadary Cohen and William A. Whiteford that follows a pair of Baltimore kids from the third grade to their high school prom.Their friendship is a special one, but just as special is the job Cohen and Whiteford do of taking us inside the heads of these two -- giving us a glimpse of the interior life of adolescents in urban America and showing how profoundly that life is shaped by the popular culture kids consume.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,Sun Movie Critic | March 23, 2007
At exhaustive length and with unseemly pride in itself, The Host tells what happens when an American military base in South Korea dumps formaldehyde down the drain and spawns a monstrous Franken- fish. It turns the Han River, which bisects Seoul, into its own Cafe Han. The proletariat revelers who fish and sunbathe and make out by the river get refreshment from modest food stands that sell fresh-cooked squid and packaged goods. But when the Thing - it becomes known as the Host - springs full-grown from the riverbank as a sloppy Joe sort of a dragon, it makes the humans its fast food.
NEWS
October 15, 2003
Otto Guensche, 86, an aide to Adolf Hitler who burned the Nazi dictator's body to keep it from the advancing Soviets in the final days of World War II, died Oct. 2 at his home in Lohmar, Germany, his eldest son said. An SS officer and member of Hitler's inner circle, Mr. Guensche spent the last hours with the Nazi leader in Hitler's bunker in Berlin before Hitler and companion Eva Braun committed suicide April 30, 1945. Mr. Guensche lived quietly in West Germany after the war following several years in Soviet captivity.
FEATURES
By Sandra Crockett | May 15, 1994
Students' video all about friendshipBong Delrosario and Donnell Green set out to prove a point. They ended up proving two points and winning an award to boot.The Millford Mill high school students proved they could make a video others would appreciate. That video, "The Mall," won a Golden Apple award from the National Educational Film and Video festival to be held in Oakland, Calif., this month.The 15-minute video took first place in the contest's student competition category, which recognizes educational media.
SPORTS
By ROCH KUBATKO | May 14, 2007
Ricky Williams says that, after some intense analysis and deep soul-searching with his psychiatrist, they've determined that there are a few things he needs to do for himself before returning to the NFL. Like, stop smoking weed. Yeah, that. Some players cut their careers short because they've taken too many hits. With this guy, it's too many bong hits. I thought he was serious about making a comeback when he hired a personal trainer. I guess it was a bad sign when it turned out to be Snoop Dogg.
NEWS
By FROM SUN STAFF AND NEWS SERVICES | February 11, 2009
Heigl, Knight out as docs on 'Grey's Anatomy' Katherine Heigl and T.R. Knight are leaving Grey's Anatomy, according to co-star James Pickens Jr. "Yes, she is," Pickens told Us Weekly when asked whether Heigl, who plays Izzie Stevens, is leaving the ABC hospital drama. "Wherever Katherine goes, I wish her nothing but the best." Pickens, speaking backstage after last weekend's NAACP Awards lunch in Beverly Hills, expressed similar sentiments regarding Knight, who plays George O'Malley.
NEWS
By LAURA VOZZELLA | April 12, 2009
Debbie Phelps has cast off the mantle of "America's Mother" for something a little more Sir Thomas More. Henceforth, the world's most famous swimming mom is to be known as "A Mother for All Seasons." That's the title of her memoir, which hit bookstores last week. Why not invoke the saint who stood up to Henry VIII in a tale about a single mom who raised an Olympic phenom? Only Phelps doesn't lose her head, even in the part - page 272 of the 274-page book - about Michael Phelps' bong picture.
SPORTS
By DAVID STEELE and DAVID STEELE,david.steele@baltsun.com | March 15, 2009
A harsh reality emerged from Michael Phelps' interview with NBC's Matt Lauer, the first part of which aired Friday morning, with the second part tonight: Phelps doesn't function that well in front of cameras he knows about, either. It was far from a shining moment for the Olympic hero, his interviewer or the network that wasted expensive morning-show and prime-time airtime on these "exclusives." However, it did offer Phelps yet another lesson: For the time being, he's much better off keeping his head down, his profile low and his mouth closed.
NEWS
By FROM SUN STAFF AND NEWS SERVICES | February 11, 2009
Heigl, Knight out as docs on 'Grey's Anatomy' Katherine Heigl and T.R. Knight are leaving Grey's Anatomy, according to co-star James Pickens Jr. "Yes, she is," Pickens told Us Weekly when asked whether Heigl, who plays Izzie Stevens, is leaving the ABC hospital drama. "Wherever Katherine goes, I wish her nothing but the best." Pickens, speaking backstage after last weekend's NAACP Awards lunch in Beverly Hills, expressed similar sentiments regarding Knight, who plays George O'Malley.
NEWS
By KATHLEEN PARKER | February 6, 2009
It's hell being a celebrity, especially if you're young and find yourself at a party, where marijuana and cameras should never mix. And it's not exactly heaven being sheriff of a county with escalating drug crimes and pressure to treat all offenders equally. Thus it is that Olympian swimmer Michael Phelps and Sheriff Leon Lott of South Carolina's Richland County are being forced to treat seriously a crime that shouldn't be one. As everyone knows by now, Mr. Phelps, a Rodgers Forge native who now lives in Baltimore, was photographed smoking from an Olympic-sized bong during a University of South Carolina party last November.
NEWS
By Kevin Van Valkenburg and Kevin Van Valkenburg,kevin.vanvalkenburg@baltsun.com | February 5, 2009
In his first interview since a photo surfaced showing him smoking from a marijuana pipe, Michael Phelps said yesterday that the intense public scrutiny has him contemplating whether he will swim in the 2012 Olympics. Phelps, who said that he "clearly made a mistake" and that the past week has been both embarrassing and uncomfortable for him, spoke with The Baltimore Sun inside Meadowbrook Aquatic Center after finishing his daily workout. While he still has goals he wants to achieve in the sport, he said, he's going to discuss it with his family and his coach, Bob Bowman.
NEWS
By LAURA VOZZELLA | February 4, 2009
Times are so tough in Baltimore that Sheila Dixon was shamed into giving at least part of her 2.5 percent pay raise to charity. But apparently not so tough that the city can't spend a total of $120,000 a year on two "special assistants" to the mayor and consider giving each of them 5 percent raises. One of them is a potential witness in the state prosecutor's case against Dixon. Today the Board of Estimates will consider raises for Bobby Potts and Howard Dixon, two retired city police officers who essentially serve as the mayor's body men. They do not act as the mayor's drivers or security guards, duties performed by current cops.
NEWS
By LAURA VOZZELLA | February 4, 2009
Times are so tough in Baltimore that Sheila Dixon was shamed into giving at least part of her 2.5 percent pay raise to charity. But apparently not so tough that the city can't spend a total of $120,000 a year on two "special assistants" to the mayor and consider giving each of them 5 percent raises. One of them is a potential witness in the state prosecutor's case against Dixon. Today the Board of Estimates will consider raises for Bobby Potts and Howard Dixon, two retired city police officers who essentially serve as the mayor's body men. They do not act as the mayor's drivers or security guards, duties performed by current cops.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,Sun movie critic | August 6, 2008
A few years ago, I tried to reconnect with a college friend who had never stopped smoking marijuana daily for three decades. We were sitting in a diner at twilight, and when the sun sank so low that you couldn't see the french fries in front of you, and the manager turned the lights on, I suddenly heard, "Wwwoh-oh-oh" - and there was my old pal, startled by standard restaurant illumination. It was funny, but it was pathetic, too. So is the new Judd Apatow production, Pineapple Express, except for me, it was less funny and a lot more pathetic.
SPORTS
By ROCH KUBATKO | May 14, 2007
Ricky Williams says that, after some intense analysis and deep soul-searching with his psychiatrist, they've determined that there are a few things he needs to do for himself before returning to the NFL. Like, stop smoking weed. Yeah, that. Some players cut their careers short because they've taken too many hits. With this guy, it's too many bong hits. I thought he was serious about making a comeback when he hired a personal trainer. I guess it was a bad sign when it turned out to be Snoop Dogg.
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