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ENTERTAINMENT
By Kit Waskom Pollard, For The Baltimore Sun | October 31, 2012
Halloween night, most caldrons will be filled with candy. But the ones on the stove might be filled with bones (cue creepy music). The holiday aside, in this era of nose-to-tail dining, adding "bones" to the shopping list doesn't seem unusual — nor should it. Dogs know what humans should: Bones are nutritious and delicious. Cooking with bones is as old as cooking itself. In the "appetizers and snacks" section of "Le Guide Culinaire," published in 1903, the famed French chef Auguste Escoffier included a simple recipe for grilled sirloin bones: "Sprinkle them with cayenne," he advised.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
Pamela Wood and The Baltimore Sun | September 30, 2014
When it comes to potential bone marrow donors, midshipmen at the Naval Academy are just the right candidates. They're a young, healthy and ethnically diverse bunch. And more than 2,000 of them have now joined a program, supported by the Pentagon, to enroll members of the military in a bone marrow donor registry. Midshipmen lined up this month to fill out paperwork and have the inside of a cheek swabbed - necessary steps to join the Salute to Life bone marrow registry, based in Rockville.
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NEWS
August 14, 1991
A man playing hide-and-seek with his two children yesterday afternoon found what appeared to be a human skull and another bone when he descended an embankment to hide beside a creek in Silver Spring, Montgomery County police said.When he saw the two brownish bones, the man ran up from the creek, which flows parallel to the Metro tracks in the 7500 block of Blair Road. He hailed members of a telephone repair crew, who notified police.Homicide detectives searched a 50-yard area along the creek and found many other bones that appeared to be human.
SPORTS
By Jonas Shaffer, The Baltimore Sun | April 27, 2014
By a strike to the jaw or by a submission on the ground, in 25 seconds or 25 minutes, Jon "Bones" Jones was going to win Saturday night. That was the consensus reached as UFC 172 neared, and it was not an unfair one. He is the best pound-for-pound fighter in the Ultimate Fighting Championship, and the allure of his fights, for as one-sided and almost unfair as they are, now seems to be in what he will say before or after them. His results have otherwise spoken for themselves. That was the case last week, when UFC's poster boy, fighting out of Endicott, N.Y., spoke of having a hometown advantage in his light-heavyweight title bout against Glover Teixeira inside Baltimore Arena.
SPORTS
By Ken Murray and Ken Murray,Sun Staff Writer | May 2, 1995
Ricky Bones tantalized the Orioles all afternoon with a sinker here and a curveball over there. What the Milwaukee Brewers' newfound ace lacked in sheer velocity, he made up for with unyielding location.And when a 7-0 Milwaukee victory was complete, there were any number of descriptions for Bones' 7 1/3 innings of two-hit pitching."Masterful," was what Brewers manager Phil Garner called it."Lucky," was how Bones saw it.Then there was Orioles manager Phil Regan, who saw red when he saw scuff marks on a series of balls that went out of play.
NEWS
By Knight-Ridder Newspapers | October 29, 1993
WASHINGTON -- Inside a crypt at the doorway of the Smithsonian Castle, inside a deep, lidded tub of white stone, rest James Smithson's bones.The founder's relics have long been an object of superstition and curiosity, even here in the Smithsonian Institution, a place of 139 million curiosities.The coming of Halloween to Washington, and a newly published murder mystery only adds to the strange allure."Mr. Smithson's Bones" is part history, part fact, and part the wild musings of author Richard Timothy Conroy.
SPORTS
By Edward Lee and Edward Lee,Sun Staff Writer | August 5, 1994
As different as Orioles pitcher Ben McDonald and his Milwaukee counterpart tonight, Ricky Bones, are, they do share one thing in common: their lack of success against the other's ballclub.The 6-foot-7 McDonald is enjoying an impressive 12-7 season with a 4.47 ERA. Although he was tagged for six runs in five innings against Toronto last Sunday, McDonald had won his three previous starts since the All-Star break.But against the Brewers, the 26-year-old right-hander from Baton Rouge, La, has hit the skids.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,Sun Staff | May 2, 1999
It is always a macabre and chilling sight -- hundreds of densely packed human bones, tumbling out of a shallow pit, unexpectedly exposed by a backhoe or erosion. But it's not some Balkan nightmare. Nearly three dozen of these bone pits, or ossuaries, have turned up in tidewater Maryland since the 1850s, one as recently as 1992. The largest held the remains of hundreds of men, women and children -- 15th- to 17th-century Native Americans who lived in an area that today stretches from Montgomery County to Maryland's Atlantic Coast.
NEWS
By Lan Nguyen and Lan Nguyen,Staff Writer | February 20, 1992
It had crossed Daniel Sheets' mind Sunday that what he found -- an object resembling a bleach bottle -- could have been a human skull. He'd found it on the side of Scarboro Road near Dublin in northern Harford County.Worried that he'd be ridiculed, the 35-year-old construction laborer didn't say anything about it until the next day as he drove to work with a friend. That night they went to the wooded area where Mr. Sheets had been collecting road litter as a community service project for a drunken-driving conviction.
FEATURES
By Dr. Modena Wilson and Dr. Alain Joffe | January 21, 1992
Q: I recently suffered a stress fracture of my left leg and my doctor told me it might be because my bones look a little thin on an X-ray. He wants to do lots of blood tests but my mother says only older women have this problem and that at 16, I have nothing to worry about. What do you think?A: We think you're right to be concerned. Although we're not sure what your doctor means by "thin bones," we assume he or she is referring to a decreased amount of calcium in the bone structure. This condition is referred to as "osteopenia" when it occurs among adolescents and young adults and "osteoporosis" when applied to older adults.
SPORTS
By Jonas Shaffer, The Baltimore Sun | April 27, 2014
In March 2011, the Ultimate Fighting Championship went to Seattle. Officials released 8,000 tickets for "UFC Fight Night: Nogueira vs. Davis," the city's first such event. They hoped to sell enough to fill out the lower bowl at KeyArena. It did not matter that the card was not pay-per-view-worthy. Ticket sales surpassed 14,000 the day before the fight. The total attendance figure (13,741) was almost 33 percent more than the previous Fight Night record (10,267). The $1.182 million gate was the first million-plus night for the series.
SPORTS
The Baltimore Sun | March 25, 2014
Freshman midfielder Stephen Kelly (Calvert Hall) underwent surgery on his broken right wrist this week and will be out indefinitely for No. 6 North Carolina, including Saturday's game against No. 10 Johns Hopkins in Baltimore. Kelly suffered the injury in the first quarter of last Tuesday's 13-10 win over Harvard but completed the game, winning 13 faceoffs against and getting eight ground balls. He missed Saturday's 11-8 victory over then-No. 1 Maryland. North Carolina used Brent Armstrong (6-for-16)
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | March 5, 2014
Multiple myeloma is cancer of the bone marrow, an incurable type of the disease that kills about 10,700 people a year. But for the 22,000 diagnosed annually, including recently Tom Brokaw, former NBC news anchor, there are new options for treatment and more kinds of therapies in the works, according to Dr. Gary I. Cohen, medical director of the Sandra & Malcolm Berman Cancer Institute at Greater Baltimore Medical Center. He answers questions about the disease. What is multiple myeloma?
SPORTS
By Paul Tierney and The Baltimore Sun | February 14, 2014
Six months after captaining the Stevenson University women's basketball team during her senior season, Sam Murray sat in a doctor's office at Sinai Hospital waiting for her diagnosis. After leading the Mustangs in scoring and being named team MVP as a junior in 2012, Murray had begun experiencing discomfort in her right knee as she prepared for her senior year. At first, she thought there was damage to her meniscus. She played through it, refusing to give up her final year of basketball to injury.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | February 5, 2014
Putting too much stress on your joints? Or maybe arthritis has become an issue? Athletes, seniors or anyone in these categories could develop a bone spur, or extra bone produced by the body. There are some things to do at home if it causes short-term pain, and a doctor can offer suggestions if the pain doesn't stop, according to Dr. James Nace, an orthopedic surgeon with the LifeBridge Health Rubin Institute for Advanced Orthopedics and a physical therapist. What is a bone spur, and why does it form?
SPORTS
By Dan Connolly | January 16, 2014
Orioles lefty Wei-Yin Chen, who had bone spurs removed from his right knee in October, had a positive examination on Thursday, giving the club hope that he'll be able to start spring training without any problem. There had been a concern that Chen was not recovering as quickly as he and the club had hoped. But Orioles manager Buck Showalter said Chen met with Dr. Richard Steadman, who performed the surgery, and the doctor gave Chen a positive report. Showalter said the belief is that Chen should be good to go when spring training begins next month.
NEWS
September 30, 2003
What appeared to be a human leg bone and partially attached foot were found about 3 p.m. yesterday at the bank of Friend Pond near Route 24 and Jarrettsville Pike in Forest Hill, a spokesman for the Harford County sheriff's office said. The amount of moss and detritus covering the bones suggested they had been in the water for at least several months, spokesman Edward Hopkins said. He said that strong winds from Tropical Storm Isabel could have dislodged the bones. Police were awaiting test results of the bones' age, Hopkins said.
NEWS
By Ed Heard and Ed Heard,Sun Staff Writer | August 11, 1995
After help from Smithsonian Institution anthropologists, Howard County police ended a four-day excavation of scattered human bones from a Woodstock stream yesterday. Now, they must determine whose bones they were and how they got there.They announced yesterday that they were focusing on three missing persons cases between 4 and 10 years old.The first evidence -- a partial skull, clothing, credit cards and a leg bone still attached to a sock and hiking boot -- was foundMonday during a volunteer cleanup of land owned by Howard County Conservancy Inc.Since then, detectives have found a set of keys, part of the jaw and additional vertebrae.
SPORTS
By Jonas Shaffer, The Baltimore Sun | December 14, 2013
Mixed martial arts star Jon "Bones" Jones said Friday that he has been told he will headline UFC 172 in Baltimore, raising the possibility of the city's first hosting of a pay-per-view Ultimate Fighting Championship event. In an interview with Fox Sports' Ariel Helwani, Jones, the brother of Ravens defensive end Arthur Jones and UFC's defending light-heavyweight champion, said he would fight next in Baltimore. "My brother's a Raven, so this is going to work out great for me," he said.
SPORTS
By Matt Vensel, The Baltimore Sun | November 10, 2013
Ravens safety James Ihedigbo surmised he could do one of two things as he walked to the sideline after Cincinnati Bengals wide receiver A.J. Green caught a Hail Mary pass that had deflected off his hands. He could hang his head after the "bone-head move" or he could make another big play - like the two he made earlier in Sunday's game - and help the Ravens escape with a victory. In overtime, with the Bengals going for it on fourth-and-2, Ihedigbo did the latter. After Giovani Bernard caught a short swing pass, Ihedigbo flew into the flat to deny Bernard the first down.
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