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By Dr. Simeon Margolis and Dr. Simeon Margolis,Special to The Sun | April 18, 1995
Q: At the time of my operation for breast cancer, the pathology report showed that the cancer had spread to a large number of lymph nodes under my arm. Because the cancer has spread, my doctor has told us that the standard treatment offers less than a 40 percent chance of living for five more years.I have heard that treatment involving a bone marrow transplant offers a better chance of survival than the usual form of therapy. Do you agree?A: There is no clear answer to your question at the present time.
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Letter to The Aegis | August 27, 2013
I would like to take this opportunity to acknowledge a marvelous group here in Harford County, who are incredible fundraisers for the AMC Cancer Research Harford County Chapter/AMC Cancer Fund, University of Colorado. I am privileged to be a part of the organization who raises monies to eradicate cancer. With heartfelt thanks and gratitude, along with humility, I salute you dedicated members of AMC Harford County Chapter. The extraordinary monies you have raised this year, with just a handful of members and many supporters, are remarkable.
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NEWS
By Peter Hermann and Peter Hermann,Staff writer | November 9, 1990
Judy Marsh, the Pasadena woman fighting Blue Cross/Blue Shield to pay for a bone marrow transplant that could rid her body of cancer, could receive a decision today.Marsh's medical records were faxed from North Carolina -- where she is scheduled to undergo the procedure -- to Washington last night.They will be reviewed by officials in the Office of Personnel Management, which sets coverage guidelines for people covered under BC/BS's federal benefit package.Meanwhile, Marsh, who lives in the 7900 block of East Shore Road, has talked to a lawyer and said she will file a lawsuit if she is turned down again.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker | February 20, 2013
Good Morning America's Robin Roberts returned to the anchor desk this morning, five months after taking temporary leave for a bone marrow transplant. Her welcome back included a video message from President Obama. "I keep pinching myself and I realize this is real," Roberts said about her return. Roberts had to get the transplant after doctors diagnosed her with the rare condition myelodysplastic syndromes, or MDS. MDS is a group of disorders that cause the bone marrow to produce an inadequate number of helathy red blood cells, white blood cells and platelets.
NEWS
By Lisa Respers and Lisa Respers,SUN STAFF | April 16, 1999
Kim Brittain has cried plenty over the past few months, but yesterday she wept tears of joy.That's because doctors have scheduled a bone marrow transplant for her 2-year-old son, Austin, after neighbors and strangers rallied to raise $56,000 to pay for the operation. Brittain tearfully thanked everyone who sent money, cards and letters."The response was overwhelming, more than we thought," Brittain said yesterday from her Norrisville home in Harford County. "I just want to let everyone know that Austin is doing well, that he is strong, and that we are so grateful."
NEWS
October 4, 1991
Thomas J. Bradley, 47, a Long Island teacher who won a highly publicized court battle last year to get medical coverage for a bone-marrow transplant to fight AIDS, died Sunday of an AIDS-related illness in Manhattan.
NEWS
June 30, 2003
On June 28, 2003, ANTOINETTE E. (nee Chell), beloved wife of Rudolph Castagnera; devoted mother of Robert and his wife Mary, Ronald and Al Quaranto Karen Castagnera and her partner Surita Goche; dear sister of Louise Marsheck, Bernard Chell and Raymond Wilkerson; grandmother of Elizabeth Castagnera and Meghan Long. Friends may call at the CONNELLY FUNERAL HOME OF DUNDALK P.A. 7110 Sollers Point Road on Tuesday from 4 to 8 P.M. where service will be held at 6:30 P.M. In lieu of flowers please make donations to Bone Marrow Transplant Fund in C/O Jason Marsheck Suite 230 3475 West Chester Pike Newton Square, PA 19073.
NEWS
October 17, 1990
MOUNT AIRY - Town officials are asking for community support and encouragement on Saturday for a Mount Airy woman stricken with leukemia.The Town Council recently passed a resolution proclaiming Saturday as Susan Hornick Day. Hornick learned in March 1989 that she has acute myelocytic leukemia.Hornick, a mother of two, has been undergoing radiation therapy. In the comings weeks, she will go to the University of Kentucky Hospital, in Lexington, for a bone-marrow transplant that could save her life.
NEWS
August 11, 1991
The Rev. Bert Benz's condition continues to improve and has been upgraded from critical to serious.Doctors are pleased with his progress, said Kay Yeltin, spokeswoman for the Markey Cancer Center, University of Kentucky, in Lexington, where the Hampstead minister has been a patient for nearly a month.Benz, pastor of Faith Baptist Church, has chronic myelogenic leukemia. The 47-year-old received a bone marrow transplant from his daughter, Lauren, 12."The reverend has been moved from the intensive care unit," Yeltin said Friday.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | April 22, 1992
BOSTON -- Contrary to their earlier assurances, Paul E. Tsongas' doctors now say that he suffered a recurrence of lymphoma in 1987, less than a year after undergoing an experimental bone marrow transplant, and was treated with an additional course of radiation for the cancer.Mr. Tsongas said in an interview Monday that he did not recall his doctors saying that a biopsy of a lymph node from his armpit in the summer of 1987 showed cancer, as the doctors say they did.Mr. Tsongas, who is the first known cancer survivor to run for president, has remained free of lymphoma, a cancer of the immune system, for five years.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | August 25, 2012
Mia Loizeaux, whose four-year struggle with a rare form of cancer shaped her determination to become an oncology nurse and help others similarly afflicted, died Thursday of the disease at Johns Hopkins Hospital. The Canton resident was 31. The daughter of a businessman and a homemaker, Mia Loizeaux was born in Baltimore and raised in Phoenix, in Baltimore County. Ms. Loizeaux attended the Bryn Mawr School and graduated in 1999 from the McDonogh School, where she had played field hockey and lacrosse.
NEWS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | January 2, 2012
Riley William Davis, whose sunny personality and quick wit sustained him and his family through his four-year battle with leukemia, died Wednesday at Johns Hopkins Children's Center. He was 13. Diagnosed with cancer at 9, Riley's life was turned upside down by treatment — including two bone-marrow transplants and hip surgery — but was not defined by it. The Hunt Valley resident loved to draw, creating his own comic strips and sketching characters such as Spider-Man with such skill that adults thought he'd traced them, said his mother, Mary Healy Davis.
NEWS
By Janene Holzberg, Special to The Baltimore Sun | September 16, 2011
Mark Gregory pauses as he relives the time when he nearly died. His gaze trails off into the distance and words fail him as he ponders a past he prefers to keep behind closed doors. Yet, he's willing to dredge up those painful events for a purpose. The River Hill resident is marking a huge cancer-survival milestone by throwing a party Sept. 30 at the Ellicott City VFW Post for dozens of his closest friends and business associates. But it won't be just any party. It will be a fundraiser to benefit the American Cancer Society's Hope Lodge in Baltimore, a temporary residence for adults receiving outpatient cancer treatment, where he stayed decades ago. Maybe it was the realization that he's beaten incredible odds — it's been 20 years since doctors handed him a death sentence — that finally spurred him to take action.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | July 23, 2010
The Canton neighborhood has discovered how good it is to give back. In the past four years, as an old convent found new life as a home to dozens of bone-marrow transplant patients and their families, Southeast Baltimore residents and business people have brought meals and love to families caught up in complicated medical treatments that stretch over many months. The Believe in Tomorrow House at St. Casimir — just off Canton's O'Donnell Square — has become the focus of neighborhood goodwill.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,fred.rasmussen@baltsun.com | August 23, 2009
Nickolas Benjamin Pippen, a chemical engineer and volunteer, died Aug. 13 of complications from a bone marrow transplant at Johns Hopkins Hospital. The Joppatowne resident was 26. Mr. Pippen was born in Baltimore and raised in Joppatowne. He was a 2000 graduate of Joppatowne High School, where he played first base on the school's varsity baseball team and was a member of its golf team. He earned a degree in chemical engineering in 2005 from the A. James Clark School of Engineering at the University of Maryland, College Park.
NEWS
By Stephanie Desmon and Stephanie Desmon,Sun reporter | March 30, 2008
Fifteen months ago, the pain from Pamela Newton's sickle cell disease was excruciating. She spent more time in the hospital than in her Capitol Heights apartment. She was on 15 pain pills a day, all heavy narcotics. She was bleeding regularly and needed daily transfusions of platelets. She had just months to live. Today, doctors at Johns Hopkins Hospital say that Newton is one of the first adults in the world to be cured of sickle cell disease - and the first using an experimental bone marrow transplant that could cure thousands like her who have been told they will never get better.
FEATURES
By Dr. Simeon Margolis and Dr. Simeon Margolis,Special to The Sun | September 6, 1994
Q: One of the men who works with me has just been hospitalized to get a bone marrow transplant for anemia. I have heard of treating anemia with iron or vitamins, but would like to know what kind of anemia requires a bone marrow transplant.A: Anemia is defined as an inadequate number of red blood cells made by the bone marrow, which also manufactures platelets and most types of white blood cells. Some types of anemia can be treated with iron-rich diets and supplements. But when bone marrow is overrun with excessive numbers of white blood cells (as in leukemia)
NEWS
December 3, 1992
If Paul Tsongas had won the Democratic nomination and been elected president, Americans now would be facing the uncomfortable prospect of having transition talk interrupted by updates on chemotherapy and radiation treatments. Rather than focusing on hopes for economic recovery and a fresh approach to problems plaguing the nation and the world, the country would be consumed with worry about the health of its new leader.That unsettling possibility raises fresh questions about the obligation of presidential candidates to disclose medical records that most citizens have every right to keep private.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | April 29, 2007
On an Internet chat room popular with breast cancer survivors, one thread - called "Where's My Remote?" - turns the mental fog known as "chemo brain" into a stand-up comedy act. One woman reported finding five unopened gallons of milk in her refrigerator and having no memory of buying the first four. A second had to ask her husband which toothbrush belonged to her. At a family celebration, one woman filled the water glasses with turkey gravy. Another could not remember how to carry over numbers when balancing the checkbook.
NEWS
By JUDY FOREMAN and JUDY FOREMAN,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | September 16, 2005
If you have cancer, is there any way to get some of the benefits of a bone marrow transplant without all the risks? Yes, it's called a mini-transplant. In a normal transplant, blood stem cells and immune cells are taken from the bone marrow or blood of the patient or from a well-matched donor. After the patient has high-dose chemotherapy and radiation to destroy his own marrow (and with luck, his cancer cells as well), the marrow or blood cells are re-infused into the patient to grow a new immune system and blood.
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