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By Paul Tierney and The Baltimore Sun | February 14, 2014
Six months after captaining the Stevenson University women's basketball team during her senior season, Sam Murray sat in a doctor's office at Sinai Hospital waiting for her diagnosis. After leading the Mustangs in scoring and being named team MVP as a junior in 2012, Murray had begun experiencing discomfort in her right knee as she prepared for her senior year. At first, she thought there was damage to her meniscus. She played through it, refusing to give up her final year of basketball to injury.
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HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | March 5, 2014
Multiple myeloma is cancer of the bone marrow, an incurable type of the disease that kills about 10,700 people a year. But for the 22,000 diagnosed annually, including recently Tom Brokaw, former NBC news anchor, there are new options for treatment and more kinds of therapies in the works, according to Dr. Gary I. Cohen, medical director of the Sandra & Malcolm Berman Cancer Institute at Greater Baltimore Medical Center. He answers questions about the disease. What is multiple myeloma?
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SPORTS
By Sandra McKee, The Baltimore Sun | October 24, 2012
A buzz spread among the North Carroll field hockey players as they gathered just inside the gate to their playing field and looked toward the parking lot. "Is she here? Is she coming?" They're all dressed in black shirts with the words "Team Heinle" printed across their backs. Each letter in "Heinle" has a word descending from it - Hope. Enthusiastic. Inspiring. Noble. Love. Extraordinary. All words that apply to Laura Heinle, the North Carroll varsity assistant coach who has coached most of them since they reached the school's junior varsity squad and who is now recovering from bone cancer.
SPORTS
By Paul Tierney and The Baltimore Sun | February 14, 2014
Six months after captaining the Stevenson University women's basketball team during her senior season, Sam Murray sat in a doctor's office at Sinai Hospital waiting for her diagnosis. After leading the Mustangs in scoring and being named team MVP as a junior in 2012, Murray had begun experiencing discomfort in her right knee as she prepared for her senior year. At first, she thought there was damage to her meniscus. She played through it, refusing to give up her final year of basketball to injury.
NEWS
December 29, 1998
Leonard Williman: In Sunday's editions of The Sun, an incorrect time was given for a memorial service for Leonard Williman, a retired department store buyer and musician who died Wednesday of bone cancer at his Linthicum home. Services for Mr. Williman, who was 87, will be held at 11 a.m. Saturdayat St. John Lutheran Church in Linthicum. The Sun regrets the error.Pub Date: 12/29/98
NEWS
June 20, 2004
Jackie Paris, 79, a jazz vocalist who toured with Charlie Parker and was said to be one of the favorite singers of Ella Fitzgerald and comedian Lenny Bruce, died Thursday in Manhattan of complications of bone cancer. He worked with Lionel Hampton and Charles Mingus and was the first to sing the lyrics to Thelonious Monk's "'Round Midnight." Later, he taught master classes and gave private lessons while continuing to record and perform.
NEWS
By Scott Calvert and Scott Calvert,SUN STAFF | March 14, 2000
The Anne Arundel County Health Department is encouraging about 20,000 northern and central county residents to have their private wells tested for radium, while stressing that the risk of contracting cancer by drinking contaminated water is small. The recommendations, outlined in letters to be mailed Thursday, were made after tests of about 1,000 homes found that two out of three wells had high levels of radium. The naturally occurring radioactive metal is thought to cause bone cancer in high doses over time.
NEWS
September 27, 2000
RESIDENTS who live in areas where county and state officials have found disturbing levels of radium don't have to feel like they are under siege. They can easily gain control over the radioactive threat. The Anne Arundel County Health Department has mailed letters to 20,000 households in northern Anne Arundel where radium has been found. The mailings advise residents to let officials test their private wells for the contaminant. The tests cost residents $64. Surprisingly, only 5 percent of residents have responded.
NEWS
By MICHAEL OLESKER | January 20, 1994
When the doctors told Jim Mustard, the WBAL-TV news reporter, that he had bone cancer, they gave him six months to live. That was 10 years ago. When they told him he had AIDS, once again they gave him six months to live. That was two years ago.Now he's sitting in his apartment, monitoring the televised earthquake reports out of California, checking the frozen world beyond his window, and wondering out loud exactly how it is that he's still alive."I don't get it," he says, voice full of wonder.
SPORTS
June 22, 1991
Baseball commissioner Fay Vincent cast a shadow on the Seattle Mariners' long-term baseball viability, saying that despite a dramatic increase in attendance this season, "Seattle is a major concern to me."Vincent said he agrees with Mariners owner Jeff Smulyan, who has criticized three relatively low TV-rights bids and a lack of support from the business community."I know Jeff. I know he doesn't want anything he's not reasonably entitled to," Vincent said. "He wants to keep the team there.
FEATURES
By Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | March 14, 2013
Larry Simns, who founded and led the Maryland Watermen's Association for four decades and was a key influence on efforts to reduce pollution in the Chesapeake Bay, died Thursday. He was 75. Mr. Simns, who grew up in the Eastern Shore fishing village of Rock Hall, was the public face of watermen, who saw their once-heavy catches of blue crabs and oysters becoming ever lighter as pollution crept into the bay. In the 1970s, he met with then-Sen. Charles McC. Mathias of Maryland, who was on a mission to examine the bay's environmental condition.
SPORTS
By Sandra McKee, The Baltimore Sun | October 24, 2012
A buzz spread among the North Carroll field hockey players as they gathered just inside the gate to their playing field and looked toward the parking lot. "Is she here? Is she coming?" They're all dressed in black shirts with the words "Team Heinle" printed across their backs. Each letter in "Heinle" has a word descending from it - Hope. Enthusiastic. Inspiring. Noble. Love. Extraordinary. All words that apply to Laura Heinle, the North Carroll varsity assistant coach who has coached most of them since they reached the school's junior varsity squad and who is now recovering from bone cancer.
EXPLORE
February 28, 2012
The grand opening of the newly constructed 28,300-square-foot Erinn McCarthy Humanities Hall at Maryvale Preparatory School will be celebrated with a ribbon cutting ceremony Monday, March 5. The building is named in memory of the late Erinn Kathleen McCarthy, Class of 2010, who died in 2007 after battling a rare form of bone cancer. The building features a 500-seat auditorium, six classrooms, a technology resource center, music and practice rooms, theater dressing rooms, a sacristy and gallery and lobby space that can be utilized for school-related events.
SPORTS
By Ken Murray, The Baltimore Sun | May 18, 2011
Nick Zito lost a horse but gained a cause in March 2010. Young children fighting bone cancer became beneficiaries in the end. Two months ago, the Hall of Fame trainer failed in his attempt to purchase Norman Asbjornson — a Preakness entry and son of Real Quiet — but was inspired to learn about the courageous battle against cancer by the son of the colt's trainer, Chris Grove . Noah Grove , now 12, was diagnosed with bone cancer in 2004 and...
NEWS
June 20, 2004
Jackie Paris, 79, a jazz vocalist who toured with Charlie Parker and was said to be one of the favorite singers of Ella Fitzgerald and comedian Lenny Bruce, died Thursday in Manhattan of complications of bone cancer. He worked with Lionel Hampton and Charles Mingus and was the first to sing the lyrics to Thelonious Monk's "'Round Midnight." Later, he taught master classes and gave private lessons while continuing to record and perform.
NEWS
September 27, 2000
RESIDENTS who live in areas where county and state officials have found disturbing levels of radium don't have to feel like they are under siege. They can easily gain control over the radioactive threat. The Anne Arundel County Health Department has mailed letters to 20,000 households in northern Anne Arundel where radium has been found. The mailings advise residents to let officials test their private wells for the contaminant. The tests cost residents $64. Surprisingly, only 5 percent of residents have responded.
NEWS
By Edward Lee and Edward Lee,SUN STAFF | January 18, 1996
For 22 years, Morris Long and the Severna Park Middle School concert band packed the house for Christmas and spring concerts.But a stroke last February and a diagnosis of bone cancer a week later forced the 50-year-old band director to retire.Now, current and former students, parents, and colleagues are saying "thank you" with hundreds of cards and bouquets to a man who has only days to live, according to his doctors."He was one of my favorite teachers," said Larry Serio, 29, a percussionist for Mr. Long 15 years ago. "He took the time to make sure you understood what he was teaching."
NEWS
By Edward Lee and Edward Lee,SUN STAFF | May 23, 1996
A torrential downpour Tuesday night could not keep the friends and admirers of the late Morris Long from a concert honoring his legacy.About 400 Severna Park Middle School students and their teachers dedicated a conductor's stand and chair to the memory of Long, the school's former band director who died of bone cancer in January. And members of one of the six groups on the program performed one of Long's favorite works. "He would've been pleased, and I know in my heart he was," said his wife, Beatrice Long, who was seated in the front row as the guest of honor.
NEWS
By Scott Calvert and Scott Calvert,SUN STAFF | March 14, 2000
The Anne Arundel County Health Department is encouraging about 20,000 northern and central county residents to have their private wells tested for radium, while stressing that the risk of contracting cancer by drinking contaminated water is small. The recommendations, outlined in letters to be mailed Thursday, were made after tests of about 1,000 homes found that two out of three wells had high levels of radium. The naturally occurring radioactive metal is thought to cause bone cancer in high doses over time.
NEWS
September 18, 1999
Frankie Vaughan,71, a British song and dance man who appealed to audiences in Las Vegas, New York and his native England, died yesterday in London. He underwent heart surgery this year. Mr. Vaughan, who made hits of "Green Door" and "Kisses Sweeter Than Wine," had a moderately successful movie career in the 1960s. He appeared in "Let's Make Love" in 1960, performing a musical number with Marilyn Monroe.Henri Storck,92, a Belgian film pioneer who broke new ground in documentaries with a 1933 account of a coal miners' strike, died Thursday in Brussels.
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