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By Susan Bondy and Susan Bondy,Creator's Syndicate | October 15, 1995
Risk-taking is inherently failure-prone. Otherwise, it would be called sure-thing-taking. But risk has taken on a whole new meaning in the '90s.Conventional wisdom used to say: Diversify your assets between stocks and bonds. Stocks were considered risky because of their historically high volatility, and bonds were considered safe because of their relative price stability.On top of that, stocks and bonds have often moved in counter-cyclic ways -- meaning that when stocks went down, bonds went up, and vice-versa.
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BUSINESS
By Tami Luhby and Tami Luhby,Newsday | March 11, 2007
Worried about market risk? How about inflation risk? The recent stock market volatility might have you thinking about bonds, cash or other "safe" investments. But consider this: You'd better stash away a lot more money in your retirement and savings accounts. Although bonds, money-market funds and other fixed-income investments generally do not have the stomach-churning volatility of stocks, they also don't have the same average returns over time. "Amassing the amount of money you need for retirement is much harder to do with lower-returning investments such as bonds," said Todd Trubey, a mutual fund analyst at Morningstar Inc. Let's say you're 30 years from retirement and have a portfolio that's 15 percent bonds and 85 percent stocks.
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BUSINESS
By Bloomberg Business News | July 21, 1993
Stocks advanced yesterday after Alan Greenspan, chairman of the Federal Reserve Board, said that second-quarter economic growth would exceed forecasts. The Dow Jones industrial average ended up 9.5 points, to 3,544.78.Mr. Greenspan told a House Banking subcommittee that the economy grew "somewhere around about 3 percent" last quarter, exceeding economists' expectations of 2.3 percent growth."Greenspan's remarks on the outlook for the economy, as well as decent earnings reports coming through today, especially from Merck & Co. and Pepsico Inc., have encouraged investors to take another look at stocks," said James Solloway, director of research at Argus Research.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | January 7, 1998
NEW YORK -- U.S. stocks had their biggest drop in two weeks on concern that earnings for banks and oil companies may not live up to expectations.Citicorp and oil producers, including Exxon Corp., led the retreat.The Dow Jones industrial average fell 72.74 to 7,906.25, erasing the gains of the first two days of the year. The Standard & Poor's 500 index lost 10.49 to 966.58 and the Nasdaq Composite Index fell 13.98 to 1,580.14.Among other broad market indexes, the Russell 2,000 index of small-capitalization stocks added 3.96 to 433.10; the Wilshire 5,000 index of stocks on the New York, American and Nasdaq stock exchanges climbed 96.73 to 9,248.
BUSINESS
By Bloomberg Business News | June 16, 1994
NEW YORK -- U.S. bonds and stocks tumbled yesterday as rising commodity prices renewed concern about inflation.A falling dollar and comments from a Federal Reserve official added to speculation that inflation may accelerate.The benchmark 30-year bond plunged 1 5/32, or $11.56 per $1,000 of bonds, sending the yield to 7.41 percent, up 10 basis points, the largest one-day rise since May 23.The Dow Jones industrial average fell 24.42, to 3,790.41, after four days of gains. Exxon Corp., Aluminum Co. of America and International Business Machines saw the largest declines, each falling more than $1.Exxon fell $1.875, to $57; Alcoa fell $1.375, to $74.50; and IBM fell $1.25, to $63.625.
BUSINESS
By Tami Luhby and Tami Luhby,Newsday | March 11, 2007
Worried about market risk? How about inflation risk? The recent stock market volatility might have you thinking about bonds, cash or other "safe" investments. But consider this: You'd better stash away a lot more money in your retirement and savings accounts. Although bonds, money-market funds and other fixed-income investments generally do not have the stomach-churning volatility of stocks, they also don't have the same average returns over time. "Amassing the amount of money you need for retirement is much harder to do with lower-returning investments such as bonds," said Todd Trubey, a mutual fund analyst at Morningstar Inc. Let's say you're 30 years from retirement and have a portfolio that's 15 percent bonds and 85 percent stocks.
BUSINESS
By Bloomberg Business News | September 2, 1993
NEW YORK -- U.S. stocks closed mixed yesterday after a series of weak economic reports stirred doubt about the strength of the recovery, offsetting continued low interest rates, money managers and analysts said.Low rates contribute to a longer recovery, cut the costs of financing for companies and coax investors to seek higher returns in stocks instead of cash deposits."The undergirding of the market is the rate structure," said Larry Wachtel, market analyst at Prudential Securities. "There is this confidence that the economy is slack enough that we're not really going to have a problem with rates."
BUSINESS
By New York Times News Service | September 3, 1995
Investing fads come and go, with everyone talking this summer about future technologies and computer stocks. Amid all the market chatter -- exchanged over cocktails, overheard on the train, whispered at museums -- people who have never put a dime in the stock market start to think about taking the plunge.But tips on hot sectors do not make sound advice for a first purchase. Constrained by a small budget or restrained by limited financial experience, the beginner needs an all-weatherinvestment, say a broad mutual fund, instead of a risky, high-flying technology stock.
BUSINESS
By Bloomberg Business News | September 29, 1993
NEW YORK -- U.S. stocks closed mixed yesterday as concern about earnings battered drug, food and retail shares while over-the-counter issues set record highs for the fourth straight day.The Dow Jones industrial average, which gained 24.59 Monday, to 3,567.70, fell 1.68 points, to 3,566.02, led by Aluminum Co. of America, Sears, Roebuck and Co. and Du Pont Co. Standard & Poor's 500 Index fell 0.27, to 461.53.Meanwhile, the Nasdaq Combined Composite Index climbed 3.71 points, to a record 763.66, led by Intel Corp.
BUSINESS
By Bloomberg Business News | October 1, 1993
NEW YORK -- Stock prices fell yesterday as long-term interest rates rose. Stocks had risen earlier in the day after government reports suggested that the economy was picking up speed."
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | May 23, 1997
NEW YORK -- U.S. stocks fell yesterday as Treasury bond yields closed in on 7 percent, a level that tempts some stock investors to buy bonds."The market's just flat-out overvalued, and bonds are pretty attractive," said Arthur Micheletti, chief investment strategist at Bailard Biehl & Kaiser, who keeps both bonds and stocks in his $1 billion portfolio.The Dow Jones industrial average declined 32.56 to 7,258.13, led by shares of International Business Machines Corp., which fell from its first record close in almost a decade.
FEATURES
By Susan Bondy and Susan Bondy,Creator's Syndicate | October 15, 1995
Risk-taking is inherently failure-prone. Otherwise, it would be called sure-thing-taking. But risk has taken on a whole new meaning in the '90s.Conventional wisdom used to say: Diversify your assets between stocks and bonds. Stocks were considered risky because of their historically high volatility, and bonds were considered safe because of their relative price stability.On top of that, stocks and bonds have often moved in counter-cyclic ways -- meaning that when stocks went down, bonds went up, and vice-versa.
BUSINESS
By New York Times News Service | September 3, 1995
Investing fads come and go, with everyone talking this summer about future technologies and computer stocks. Amid all the market chatter -- exchanged over cocktails, overheard on the train, whispered at museums -- people who have never put a dime in the stock market start to think about taking the plunge.But tips on hot sectors do not make sound advice for a first purchase. Constrained by a small budget or restrained by limited financial experience, the beginner needs an all-weatherinvestment, say a broad mutual fund, instead of a risky, high-flying technology stock.
BUSINESS
By Bloomberg Business News | June 16, 1994
NEW YORK -- U.S. bonds and stocks tumbled yesterday as rising commodity prices renewed concern about inflation.A falling dollar and comments from a Federal Reserve official added to speculation that inflation may accelerate.The benchmark 30-year bond plunged 1 5/32, or $11.56 per $1,000 of bonds, sending the yield to 7.41 percent, up 10 basis points, the largest one-day rise since May 23.The Dow Jones industrial average fell 24.42, to 3,790.41, after four days of gains. Exxon Corp., Aluminum Co. of America and International Business Machines saw the largest declines, each falling more than $1.Exxon fell $1.875, to $57; Alcoa fell $1.375, to $74.50; and IBM fell $1.25, to $63.625.
BUSINESS
By Bloomberg Business News | May 11, 1994
NEW YORK -- U.S. stocks advanced yesterday, ending a two-day slide, as U.S. government bonds, overseas stock markets and the dollar all rallied.Bonds and the dollar gained as Germany lowered a key money market interest rate and a sale of $17 billion of three-year TC Treasury notes drew strong demand."
BUSINESS
By Bloomberg Business News | October 1, 1993
NEW YORK -- Stock prices fell yesterday as long-term interest rates rose. Stocks had risen earlier in the day after government reports suggested that the economy was picking up speed."
BUSINESS
By Bloomberg Business News | May 11, 1994
NEW YORK -- U.S. stocks advanced yesterday, ending a two-day slide, as U.S. government bonds, overseas stock markets and the dollar all rallied.Bonds and the dollar gained as Germany lowered a key money market interest rate and a sale of $17 billion of three-year TC Treasury notes drew strong demand."
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | January 7, 1998
NEW YORK -- U.S. stocks had their biggest drop in two weeks on concern that earnings for banks and oil companies may not live up to expectations.Citicorp and oil producers, including Exxon Corp., led the retreat.The Dow Jones industrial average fell 72.74 to 7,906.25, erasing the gains of the first two days of the year. The Standard & Poor's 500 index lost 10.49 to 966.58 and the Nasdaq Composite Index fell 13.98 to 1,580.14.Among other broad market indexes, the Russell 2,000 index of small-capitalization stocks added 3.96 to 433.10; the Wilshire 5,000 index of stocks on the New York, American and Nasdaq stock exchanges climbed 96.73 to 9,248.
BUSINESS
By Bloomberg Business News | September 29, 1993
NEW YORK -- U.S. stocks closed mixed yesterday as concern about earnings battered drug, food and retail shares while over-the-counter issues set record highs for the fourth straight day.The Dow Jones industrial average, which gained 24.59 Monday, to 3,567.70, fell 1.68 points, to 3,566.02, led by Aluminum Co. of America, Sears, Roebuck and Co. and Du Pont Co. Standard & Poor's 500 Index fell 0.27, to 461.53.Meanwhile, the Nasdaq Combined Composite Index climbed 3.71 points, to a record 763.66, led by Intel Corp.
BUSINESS
By Bloomberg Business News | September 2, 1993
NEW YORK -- U.S. stocks closed mixed yesterday after a series of weak economic reports stirred doubt about the strength of the recovery, offsetting continued low interest rates, money managers and analysts said.Low rates contribute to a longer recovery, cut the costs of financing for companies and coax investors to seek higher returns in stocks instead of cash deposits."The undergirding of the market is the rate structure," said Larry Wachtel, market analyst at Prudential Securities. "There is this confidence that the economy is slack enough that we're not really going to have a problem with rates."
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