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By Knight-Ridder News Service | November 28, 1993
Investors chasing higher interest rates have switched billions of dollars out of low-yielding money-market funds and bank accounts into mutual funds that invest in bonds.Some of those investors have received a lesson in the past few weeks: The higher yields paid by bonds and bond funds carry with them the risk that the value of principal can fall.Bond prices move in the opposite direction from interest rates. Interest rates on long-term bonds have moved up more than one-half of a percentage point since mid-October.
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BUSINESS
By GAIL MARKSJARVIS and GAIL MARKSJARVIS,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | July 16, 2006
With all the fretting about inflation during the past few months, you might think that a TIPS mutual fund would be just the ticket. After all, TIPS, or "Treasury inflation-protected securities," are U.S. government bonds structured to help you weather inflation. Twice a year, the government automatically adjusts the bonds so the returns keep up with inflation. But if you have a TIPS mutual fund in your portfolio, you might be surprised to see your next statement. Rather than seeing the protection you expected, you are likely to spot a loss.
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BUSINESS
By Suzanne Wooton and Suzanne Wooton,Sun Staff Writer | October 8, 1994
USAir's stock and bond prices dropped yesterday, the latest sign that investors are growing increasingly uneasy about the Arlington, Va.-based carrier after a breakdown in crucial talks between the company and its pilots to cut costs.The Air Line Pilots Association broke off negotiations with the airline Thursday after USAir said it planned to sell about 7 percent of its fleet, including all of its Boeing 767s, and reduce or eliminate its trans-Atlantic service.Grounding of the aircraft would mean pilots assigned to those jets would be moved to lower-paying jobs flying smaller planes.
BUSINESS
By BILL BARNHART | March 6, 2005
IF YOU FOLLOW financial market news too closely, you will run into yourself. In late January 2004, I wrote this: "Beginning last fall, most analysts bet interest rates would rise in 2004, eroding the value of bonds and other fixed-income investments. That forecast will come true someday. But January has witnessed a surprise rally in bonds. The yield on the benchmark 10-year note fell below 4 percent last week for the first time since October." Those observations would be true again today, word-for-word, just by changing 2004 to 2005 and "last week" to "last month."
BUSINESS
By Robert Hurtado and Robert Hurtado,New York Times News Service | February 22, 1993
President Clinton's plan to impose higher taxes and cut the deficit by $500 billion within four years gave municipal bond prices a boost last week, as investors turned to tax-exempt municipals as a hedge against the coming increases.But some analysts cautioned that the rush to these tax shelters has created a greater demand than the current available supply of municipal bonds can accommodate.As a result, analysts said, investors are paying premium prices for the available issues, and some may end up buying bonds they might normally shun as too risky.
BUSINESS
By Julius Westheimer | July 28, 1994
After bond prices fell yesterday following June's strong durable goods report, stocks declined in moderate trading. The Dow Jones industrial average dipped 15.21 points, closing at 3,720.47. The 30-year government bond slipped 1/2 point to yield 7.60 percent, and the Treasury's 5-year note auction brought investors 6.95 percent, the note's highest return since 1991.AND NOW WHERE? August in Wall Street has historically been a moderately "up" month, rising an average 0.2 percent over the last 43 years . . . "I'm negative because interest rates will rise soon and stocks are basically overvalued.
BUSINESS
By New York Times News Service | April 21, 1994
Yesterday was a baffling day on Wall Street.For months, the stock market has followed the bond market, in lock step, up and down, but mostly down. Yet when bonds rallied yesterday, stocks plunged, as good signals from the bond market alternated with bad signals elsewhere. When stock traders become baffled, they tend to sell.And they sold yesterday in unusually hectic trading. The Dow Jones industrial average fell 21.11 points, to 3,598.71. The broader Standard & Poor's 500-stock index also fell, but less precipitously -- 0.58 point, to 441.96.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | January 24, 2001
WASHINGTON - The Securities and Exchange Commission approved a program yesterday that, for the first time, will collect and distribute information on trading in the $3.4 trillion corporate bond market. The agency, whose chairman, Arthur Levitt, has called corporate bonds a "needlessly dark corner of our capital markets," cleared a package of rules drafted by the National Association of Securities Dealers. The program, which will be operated by the NASD, creates the Trade Reporting and Comparison Entry system, known as Trace, which will collect data on all corporate-bond trades for use by federal regulators, including enforcement offices watching for improper spreads in corporate-bond trades.
BUSINESS
By Bloomberg Business News | March 10, 1993
NEW YORK -- Led by companies whose earnings benefit from lower interest rates, stocks finished mixed yesterday on the heels of Monday's powerful rally."
BUSINESS
By Gail MarksJarvis and Gail MarksJarvis,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | February 6, 2000
There was a time when the American icon of the life of leisure was a gentleman so well-situated that he simply spent his days lounging around clipping bond coupons. But a new era has come along to change the formerly easy life of corporate bond investors, whether they're rich or of moderate means. "Gone are the days when you just buy a bond and hold it," says Mark Simenstad, Lutheran Brotherhood portfolio manager. "Even the old stalwarts can get hurt very fast." Consider some of the household names that have recently been battered: J. C. Penney, Saks, Waste Management, Lockheed, Safeco and Levi Strauss.
BUSINESS
By EILEEN AMBROSE | November 28, 2004
THERE WAS a time not too long ago when stocks were scary and bonds looked safe. Investors rushed into bonds, only to discover that fixed-income investments can be risky, too. Complaints regarding brokers and bonds shot up. Last year, arbitration cases involving corporate bonds rose to 353. That's a fraction of the several thousand arbitrations over stocks and mutual funds last year, but more than double the number of bond cases in 2001, according to...
BUSINESS
By JAY HANCOCK | October 2, 2002
THE BULL market has powered forward for two decades, confounding experts and enriching millions. Analysts talk about a new economic era and additional gains to come, and with each new high, it seems, more mutual funds are introduced to catch the cash sluicing into the market. Bears surrender, don longhorns and join the roundup. Sometimes, cautious voices interrupt the revel. But events seem to prove them wrong. These doubters have been skeptical for years, even as the indexes kept attaining new highs.
SPORTS
By Peter Schmuck and Peter Schmuck,SUN STAFF | September 9, 2001
San Francisco Giants superstar Barry Bonds is staging the ultimate salary drive. He hit his 60th home run on Thursday and stayed on pace to challenge Mark McGwire's single-season home run record, which can only put his team in an unenviable position this winter. How would you like to be on the other side of the bargaining table after Bonds files for free agency in November? His agent is Scott Boras, whose top free agent last year - shortstop Alex Rodriguez - not only broke the record for the largest guaranteed contract in the history of professional sports, but also doubled it. The Giants want Bonds back, but club officials have to wonder just how far it would be prudent to go with a 37-year-old player who is likely to ask for the world ... and maybe a few of the other planets while he's at it. Owner Peter Magowan recently tied the magnitude of his club's effort to re-sign Bonds directly to the success of the team this season, which was a pretty wily move under the circumstances.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | January 24, 2001
WASHINGTON - The Securities and Exchange Commission approved a program yesterday that, for the first time, will collect and distribute information on trading in the $3.4 trillion corporate bond market. The agency, whose chairman, Arthur Levitt, has called corporate bonds a "needlessly dark corner of our capital markets," cleared a package of rules drafted by the National Association of Securities Dealers. The program, which will be operated by the NASD, creates the Trade Reporting and Comparison Entry system, known as Trace, which will collect data on all corporate-bond trades for use by federal regulators, including enforcement offices watching for improper spreads in corporate-bond trades.
BUSINESS
By Gail MarksJarvis and Gail MarksJarvis,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | February 6, 2000
There was a time when the American icon of the life of leisure was a gentleman so well-situated that he simply spent his days lounging around clipping bond coupons. But a new era has come along to change the formerly easy life of corporate bond investors, whether they're rich or of moderate means. "Gone are the days when you just buy a bond and hold it," says Mark Simenstad, Lutheran Brotherhood portfolio manager. "Even the old stalwarts can get hurt very fast." Consider some of the household names that have recently been battered: J. C. Penney, Saks, Waste Management, Lockheed, Safeco and Levi Strauss.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | May 6, 1998
NEW YORK -- A barometer measuring U.S. economic growth improved for the third straight month during March, paced by stock market gains.The Conference Board's Index of Leading Economic Indicators, designed to be a predictor of activity over the next half-year, rose 0.2 percent in March after climbing an unrevised 0.4 percent in February and 0.1 percent in January."
BUSINESS
By EILEEN AMBROSE | November 28, 2004
THERE WAS a time not too long ago when stocks were scary and bonds looked safe. Investors rushed into bonds, only to discover that fixed-income investments can be risky, too. Complaints regarding brokers and bonds shot up. Last year, arbitration cases involving corporate bonds rose to 353. That's a fraction of the several thousand arbitrations over stocks and mutual funds last year, but more than double the number of bond cases in 2001, according to...
BUSINESS
By New York Times News Service | October 30, 1992
NEW YORK -- A growing number of mutual fund investors are moving away from long-term bond funds, evidently fearing lower bond prices that could be brought on by higher interest rates, some mutual fund companies said yesterday. The investors seem to be shifting into stock mutual funds and money market funds.The drift from longer-term bond funds is by no means a rout, and some fund groups said their bond funds continued to pull in investor money. But it nonetheless signaled investor caution, which no doubt was brought about by rising interest rates and falling bond prices earlier this month.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | July 1, 1997
NEW YORK -- U.S. stocks were mixed yesterday on the last day of the second quarter, as rising bond yields offset gains in Philip Morris Cos. and other tobacco shares.The mixed performance closed the best quarter for stocks since the first three months of 1987. While investors doubt that the second half will repeat the near-20 percent gains of the first, many say a mix of economic growth and scant inflation will keep the market from losing its gains, as it did in the crash of 1987."The fundamentals are really sound," said Gail Bardin, a money manager with Hotchkis & Wiley, which oversees $10 billion.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG BUSINESS NEWS | August 31, 1996
WASHINGTON -- The U.S. economy is roaring back from a midyear lull as new reports yesterday showed that consumer spending rose last month, manufacturing picked up steam and consumer confidence marched higher.That combination was too strong for many investors, though, and U.S. stock and bond prices plunged for a second consecutive day. The concern is that the Federal Reserve will stomp on the brakes with higher interest rates to cool the economy it expected to slow in the second half of the year.
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