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NEWS
By Amy L. Miller and Amy L. Miller,Staff Writer | August 17, 1993
Nearly $1.3 million in tax-free bond money will be available for county industries looking to expand in the next year, Carroll County's commissioners were told yesterday.The federal government has permanently extended the industrial revenue bond program as part of its new budget, said William E. Jenne, administrator of the county office of economic development."Industrial revenue bonds are one of the best tools at my disposal as an economic developer in the effort to help manufacturers expand their operations in Carroll County," he said.
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NEWS
By Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | September 9, 2013
Amid continued protests, the Baltimore City Council is set to give final approval Monday to more than $100 million in taxpayer assistance for the massive Harbor Point development that the mayor calls a "once-in-a-generation opportunity. " Council members say they expect the $107 million in tax-increment-financing bonds for the waterfront project to pass easily despite a late effort by community groups, activists and unions to amend the legislation. Critics question both the size of the aid package and the amenities on which the money will be spent.
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NEWS
By LAURA CADIZ and LAURA CADIZ,SUN REPORTER | April 14, 2006
The county's restoration of the Blandair Mansion sustained a slight setback at the end of the General Assembly when the county did not receive $500,000 in state bond money. The county had requested the money -- which it had planned to match, bringing the total to $1 million -- to help offset design and preliminary site development costs. Without that state money, the county will have to cover the total cost, possibly in the next budget year or the year after that, said Gary J. Arthur, director of the Department of Recreation and Parks.
NEWS
By Gadi Dechter | February 14, 2011
And now for something completely different: an exotic financial instrument designed to help vulnerable Americans — not drive them into foreclosure. Today, the White House plans to ask Congress for permission to conduct a $100 million test of "social impact bonds," a promising, experimental investment scheme out of England designed to get better results from publicly funded social services by harnessing the discipline of the private market. Under a social impact bond arrangement, investors put up the money to run privately managed social programs.
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,SUN STAFF | November 10, 1996
Though Baltimore County officials on Tuesday won overwhelming voter approval for $89.6 million in school construction bonds, they must prove they can spend the money wisely."
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,SUN STAFF | March 19, 2002
If recession-driven budget cuts eliminate state bond money normally distributed among Maryland's counties, Howard won't get $1.4 million it wants for three high-priority projects - a new police-fire training facility, Circuit Court renovations and restoration of the mansion house at Blandair, the county's new 300-acre park in Columbia. In addition, Howard County Executive James N. Robey asked for $1 million in bond funding to help a Columbia-based acupuncture school move to a larger campus.
NEWS
By Sandra Crockett and Sandra Crockett,Baltimore County Bureau of The Sun | January 8, 1991
The Baltimore County school board giveth and now it wants to taketh back.In 1983, the Board of Education gave the old Lutherville Elementary School to the county government because its enrollment had dwindled. Now enrollment is surging, and the board wants the building back so it can reopen the school in September 1992.The alternative is to seek state financing to build new schools or additions to existing buildings, no easy task in this time of financial austerity, said James E. Kraft, director of school planning.
NEWS
February 2, 1993
It never made much sense for the state of Maryland to put most of its Baltimore-area office workers into expensive rental space. As rents rise, so do the costs to state taxpayers. It is a never-ending upward cycle.Three years ago, the Schaefer administration came up with TC proposal to use $88 million in bond money to buy up cheap office space in the city for its own use. But the General Assembly killed that idea in order to save money. It actually ended up costing taxpayers a bundle.Fortunately, Gov. William Donald Schaefer never gave up on the notion of buying downtown office buildings.
NEWS
By Patrick Gilbert and Patrick Gilbert,Sun Staff Writer | April 12, 1995
With a bit of tinkering, Baltimore County Executive C. A. Dutch Ruppersberger III has added $12 million to next year's proposed capital budget, largely for school construction and improvements to the county's older communities.The new county executive is expected to deliver the bricks-and-mortar spending plan along with his first operating budget today. Both require final approval by the County Council, which may cut money from his requests but may not increase spending.The county planning board had recommended a $149.
NEWS
September 8, 1992
Comptroller Louis L. Goldstein slammed the door last week on a state plan to buy valuable open spaces in Maryland with bond money to prevent these precious acres of greenery from being turned into rows of town houses. His action could have severe and damaging repercussions in the Baltimore area.No one can fault Mr. Goldstein for being reluctant to issue state bonds instead of cash for these land purchases. After all, why pay interest when you can avoid it? But sometimes it is necessary to borrow, which is why the General Assembly specifically authorized the issuance of bonds to buy green spaces for future preservation.
NEWS
By LAURA CADIZ and LAURA CADIZ,SUN REPORTER | April 14, 2006
The county's restoration of the Blandair Mansion sustained a slight setback at the end of the General Assembly when the county did not receive $500,000 in state bond money. The county had requested the money -- which it had planned to match, bringing the total to $1 million -- to help offset design and preliminary site development costs. Without that state money, the county will have to cover the total cost, possibly in the next budget year or the year after that, said Gary J. Arthur, director of the Department of Recreation and Parks.
NEWS
By Laura Loh and Laura Loh,SUN STAFF | May 12, 2005
The O'Malley administration backed away yesterday from its plan to take control of city money used for school construction, saying it reached an agreement with school officials that will give it more oversight of how such dollars are spent. The agreement calls for two city employees to help the school system manage renovation and construction projects. The city will also devote two of its weekly meetings with senior school staff every month to monitoring capital projects. School officials had opposed the city taking over about $90 million in city bond money approved for school construction.
BUSINESS
By Bill Atkinson and Bill Atkinson,SUN STAFF | May 9, 2004
GULF BREEZE, Fla. - On U.S. 98, the crowded main drag that slices across Florida's Panhandle, it's easy to speed past Gulf Breeze. The city, which juts out into the blue waters of Pensacola Bay, is known for two things - its snowy white beaches and UFO sightings. But Gulf Breeze, population 6,189, has another, less public claim to fame - it has floated about $2 billion in tax-free municipal bonds used in recent years to finance everything from a Hyatt Regency hotel in Orlando to sprawling convention and resort projects with casinos built by Baltimore-based Cordish Co. for the Seminole Tribe of Florida.
NEWS
By MICHAEL OLESKER | March 16, 2004
NOW WE get personal on the schools. You start with a couple of ticked-off City Council members, Robert Curran and Keiffer Mitchell, and you go to Mayor Martin O'Malley turning his back on the governor, and you put aside for one moment all talk of multimillion-dollar bailouts and trembling bond ratings, because now it comes down to something as simple as the perceived human kiss-off. We start with Curran, pacing furiously in a City Hall corridor, sputtering and fuming and holding up sheets of paper containing numbers that Curran calls lies.
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,SUN STAFF | March 19, 2002
If recession-driven budget cuts eliminate state bond money normally distributed among Maryland's counties, Howard won't get $1.4 million it wants for three high-priority projects - a new police-fire training facility, Circuit Court renovations and restoration of the mansion house at Blandair, the county's new 300-acre park in Columbia. In addition, Howard County Executive James N. Robey asked for $1 million in bond funding to help a Columbia-based acupuncture school move to a larger campus.
NEWS
October 31, 1998
WHEN Baltimore County residents go to the polls Tuesday, they will be asked to authorize $195 million in bond financing. That's quite a bit of money. But improving the county's infrastructure is so important that the package deserves citizen support.Question E, the biggest item, is a telling example. Although it would authorize the county to borrow $85 million for school maintenance and renovation, most of the money would go for roofs and other long-delayed repairs at older elementary schools.
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,SUN STAFF | August 5, 1996
Alarmed by predictions of severe crowding in Baltimore County high schools, the Ruppersberger administration is seeking to make last-minute changes in favor of school construction in the $137.5 million bond referendum that will be on the November ballot.If approved by schools Superintendent Anthony G. Marchione when he returns from vacation today, and by the County Council tonight, bond money would be shifted from other needs and added to the $66.6 million allocated for school borrowing.The county expects to get another $32 million for school construction from the state during the two-year period covered by the bonds.
NEWS
By John Rivera and John Rivera,Sun Staff Writer Sun staff writer Liz Atwood contributed to this article | April 12, 1994
A bill funding the re-bricking of Main Street in Annapolis, which even its most staunch supporters thought was dead, was revived and passed on the last day of the General Assembly.The House yesterday compromised and gave the city half of the $2.5 million it requested for the $5 million reconstruction project.Annapolis will get the other $1.25 million for the project -- which includes laying new brick in the street, reconstructing the road bed, burying utilities and fixing sidewalks -- from a state Department of Transportation trust fund that is used for road reconstruction.
NEWS
By Jackie Powder and Jackie Powder,SUN STAFF | January 30, 1998
During last year's General Assembly session, Del. Ellen Willis Miller took the lead in securing $300,000 in state money for a new exhibition center and arena at the Carroll County Agricultural Center in Westminster.Pledging continued support, Miller prefiled a bill for the 1998 legislative session for another $300,000 in matching state bond money.Last week, project organizers were surprised and disappointed when Miller withdrew her proposal, saying that the project lacked focus, had grown too large and would create problems for the adjacent residential community.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,SUN STAFF | January 30, 1998
After nearly 18 months, Sykesville has completed roads, sidewalks and other work at Carroll Fields, projects the subdivision's developer failed to do.The Town Council voted to release the remainder -- about $80,000 -- of the original bond money posted by B&H Investments of Eldersburg, developer of the 60-home subdivision on Second Avenue.The release, however, depends on a final inspection. A portion of the money must also be reserved for a one-year maintenance agreement in case any problems occur.
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