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BUSINESS
Eileen Ambrose | March 26, 2013
When it comes to generating income from investments, Americans' expectations for returns are significantly higher than what they are actually earning, according to a survey released this morning by Legg Mason Inc. “Our survey is telling us that income-oriented investors in the U.S. are coming up well short of their goals - almost 3 percent short - and that number could be significant especially for retired investors who need to live on the income their...
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BUSINESS
Eileen Ambrose | March 26, 2013
When it comes to generating income from investments, Americans' expectations for returns are significantly higher than what they are actually earning, according to a survey released this morning by Legg Mason Inc. “Our survey is telling us that income-oriented investors in the U.S. are coming up well short of their goals - almost 3 percent short - and that number could be significant especially for retired investors who need to live on the income their...
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NEWS
February 19, 1991
Though Harford County is in the middle of a hiring freeze, two jobs are open: a financial adviser and bond counsel. The expertise of those specialists will be needed before the county goes to the bond market sometime in October or November to borrow more than $6 million to finance four building projects.The decision to borrow from Wall Street represents a change in Harford County's recent fiscal practices.Pay-as-you-go financing was the hallmark of Habern W. Freeman Jr.'s eight years as county executive.
BUSINESS
By Gail Marksjarvis and Gail Marksjarvis,Tribune Media Services | June 24, 2007
It's a confusing time for bond investors. One day analysts are fretting over the possibility of more inflation, which, of course, could cause bond yields to climb and make investors regret the fact that they bought bonds now instead of waiting for higher-interest bonds later. On other days, the pros are fretting about the opposite - that the economy could slow down and cause interest rates to drop. Then investors would be happy about having the foresight to have bought bonds before they started paying less interest.
BUSINESS
By Thomas Easton and Thomas Easton,New York Bureau of The Sun | May 11, 1991
NEW YORK -- Stock prices crumbled at the end of trading yesterday after a steep decline in the Treasury bond market that traders suggested could have stemmed from several troubled financial institutions liquidating their holdings.The Dow Jones industrial average, which was down only slightly throughout much of the session, slid modestly in the afternoon and then plunged abruptly in the last hour, closing down 50.98 points at 2,920.17. The slide was widespread, with about two issues on the New York Stock Exchange falling in value for every one that rose.
BUSINESS
By Bloomberg Business News | April 8, 1994
NEW YORK -- U.S. stocks overcame early losses to close higher yesterday, buoyed by a rally in the government bond market along with better-than-expected March sales from the nation's largest retailers.The rally in bonds touched off computer-guided buy orders for stocks shortly before the close as concern about another rate increase by the Federal Reserve eased, traders said. Retail shares such as Wal-Mart Stores Inc. paced the stock market's gains."A certain level of comfort has come back to both markets," said Thomas Gallagher, head trader at Oppenheimer & Co. "People feel it will be awhile before the Fed tightens again."
BUSINESS
By Bloomberg Business News | November 24, 1993
NEW YORK -- U.S. stocks recouped some of Monday's losses as the government bond market rallied for the first time in seven sessions and Britain lowered a key interest rate.Low rates prompt people to move money out of fixed-rate investments and into the stock market in hopes of finding higher returns. They also speed the economic recovery. The rate cut in Britain was perceived as good for the United States because Britain is an important export market for U.S. companies, traders said."The stock market was due for a rally, and the bond market was the catalyst," said Barry Berman, head trader at Robert W. Baird.
BUSINESS
By Thomas Easton and Thomas Easton,New York Bureau | March 10, 1992
NEW YORK -- Only a few years after largely abandoning a move into the "junk" bond market that coincided with the 1980s boom and bust in dicey credits, Baltimore-based Alex. Brown quietly re-entered the market last year and has just registered for its first underwriting of new speculative debt.The deal, a $90 million financing for McGaw Inc., a producer of intravenous fluids, is intended to start a small but lucrative banking effort that will consummate as many as a dozen underwritings annually.
BUSINESS
By Bloomberg Business News | January 12, 1993
NEW YORK -- A firming in Treasury bond prices lifted U.S. stocks from a two-day slump, as over-the-counter issues sprinted to a record yesterday."The fact that the bond market has stabilized has helped" stocks, said Peter Canelo, chief investment strategist at NatWest Securities.Stock prices closed at session highs following a flurry of computerguided buy orders just before the close, according to Birinyi Associates. A resumption of the rally in computer, software, and semiconductor shares, combined with rebounds in battered blue chips like Merck & Co., buoyed share prices as well, traders said.
BUSINESS
By Bloomberg Business News | March 16, 1993
NEW YORK -- U.S. stocks rebounded yesterday from a two-session slide as weakness in the Treasury bond market prompted some investors to switch funds into stocks."
BUSINESS
By Walter Hamilton and Tom Petruno and Walter Hamilton and Tom Petruno,Los Angeles Times | June 8, 2007
Rising interest rates suddenly are giving global stock markets a fear of heights. Shares slumped worldwide yesterday as long-term bond yields surged and several central banks boosted their bellwether short-term rates. U.S. market indexes suffered their biggest declines in three months, with the Dow Jones industrial average sliding 198.94 points, or 1.48 percent to 13,266.73, its third straight loss. But the same force driving interest rates up - a strong world economy - also has underpinned the powerful rally in stocks this year, analysts note.
BUSINESS
By Suzanne Cosgrove and Suzanne Cosgrove,Chicago Tribune | March 11, 2007
Low U.S. interest rates have been a boon for the junk bond market in the past few years, allowing companies to take on new debt at a rapid clip. What that has meant for investors and the outlook for junk bonds going forward is less certain. While many investors have been fixated by the stock market's gyrations, others are taking a hard look at the bond market, including junk bonds. Last year, corporate debt issuance advanced at the fastest pace in five years, "as new issuance turned increasingly aggressive, moving away from refinancing," according to a recent report by Fitch Ratings Inc. Against the backdrop of a stable economy and a Federal Reserve that has stayed the course on interest rates since June, defaults on debt - failure to make timely payments of principal and interest - have been at historically low levels, analysts say. In a recent research report, Fitch said the U.S. high-yield default rate ended 2006 at 0.8 percent, down from 3.1 percent in 2005 and well below a long-term average rate of 5 percent.
BUSINESS
By Tom Petruno and Tom Petruno,Los Angeles Times | February 18, 2007
History isn't supposed to repeat, but investors this year may have the feeling that they've been here before. U.S. and most foreign stock markets are off to a strong start, the same as in 2006. And Wall Street's primary obsession remains whether the Federal Reserve is finished tightening credit. When Fed Chairman Ben S. Bernanke testified before Congress last week, much of his commentary was right in line with the economic "soft landing" forecast that underlies the bullish case for stocks.
BUSINESS
By Bloomberg News | October 7, 2006
DALLAS -- In a desolate field of tall grass in Texas, 20-foot-high concrete pillars stand in a line. Crows fly above, and old cattle gates sway in a warm breeze. The pillars were built 25 years ago to hold a Disneyland-style type of monorail in a 12,000-acre business park and residential development that was never completed. The unfinished community, named Las Colinas, was financed by $311 million in municipal bonds. When the Dallas County Utility and Reclamation District issued most of the bonds, it paid extra for insurance against the risk of default.
BUSINESS
By Jay Hancock | August 10, 2005
DEAR USA Today: Aether Holdings is not an Internet company. It does not belong on your "Internet 50" stock index or on your "e-Consumer 25" list with eBay, Google, Intuit and Amazon.com, where it has been listed daily for years. Aether hasn't been a technology company since September, when it sold its last two wireless communications divisions. Exactly what Aether is, however, has gotten murky again. Billion-dollar wireless powerhouse? Nope. Modest mortgage banker? Not that either, apparently.
BUSINESS
By BILL BARNHART and BILL BARNHART,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | July 31, 2005
When bond rating agencies downgraded General Motors in May, the world's largest automaker joined an exclusive club, or rogues' gallery, if you prefer. In recent years, a number of other household-name companies - Xerox, AT&T, Eastman Kodak, Maytag, Enron, Tyco, Lucent, WorldCom, RJR - saw their debt drop from investment grade to speculative grade, or "high yield" securities. They became fallen angels, in the parlance of the bond market. In some cases, notably WorldCom and Enron, fallen angels slid into default and bankruptcy proceedings.
BUSINESS
By Timothy J. Mullaney | April 14, 1996
Wall Street is at it again. A strong employment report sent markets reeling last week. The excuse du jour was the same: the best news on interest rates is behind us. Investors were little salved by news Wednesday that 1995's productivity gains were the biggest in three years, or by inflation reports showing prices close to dormant except for a blip in energy costs. These reports should help: more productivity means the economy can grow more without inflation, and rates theoretically rise to fight inflation.
BUSINESS
By Bloomberg Business News | June 11, 1995
NEW YORK -- Looking for reasons to think the bond market rally isn't over?Here's one: Some traditional buyers of bonds in previous rallies haven't joined this one yet -- mutual fund investors. History shows that bond market rallies usually don't end until people pour money into bond funds.Edward S. Hyman, president of ISI Group Inc., a New York money management and economic consulting firm, published a report this month studying the relationship between bond yields and bond fund sales since 1984.
BUSINESS
By BILL BARNHART | June 12, 2005
AFTER encouraging rallies last month, the stock and bond markets have stalled. Major stock indexes remain in negative territory for 2005. Forecasts of second-quarter corporate profits are bland. Trading activity appears to be in the summer doldrums. All eyes on Wall Street have shifted from stock prices to interest rates. This is alien territory for most individual investors, but here's a tip: We're all bond traders now. Home-buying is the critical element. The outlook for long-term interest rates, which determine home mortgages, is the bottom line of the investment picture.
BUSINESS
By Blanca Torres and Blanca Torres,SUN STAFF | April 27, 2005
Profit at Baltimore-based T. Rowe Price Group Inc. rose 22 percent to $94 million during the first quarter compared with the corresponding period last year as more investors poured money into the company's mutual funds. Revenue was $357 million between January and March, compared with $305.7 million during the first three months of 2004, a 17 percent increase. The mutual fund manager's return of 69 cents per diluted share missed the 70-cent return predicted by Thomson Financial. Revenue of $362.
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