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HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | September 30, 2011
Bon Secours Baltimore Health System has turned around its financial fortunes and is posting profits two years after receiving financial help from the state to prevent it from closing. Executives said Friday that the organization is financially sound enough to start implementing a new strategic plan that it hopes will help improve health in the West Baltimore community it serves. CEO Samuel Ross said the plan would reduce emergency room visits and focus on preventive care and chronic disease management.
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NEWS
October 3, 2014
Classes at hospital Howard County General Hospital will sponsor the following classes at the HCGH Wellness Center, Suite 100, 10710 Charter Drive, Columbia unless otherwise listed. Advanced registration for all programs at hcgh.com. Information: 410-740-7601. •CPR classes. Earn a two-year American Heart Association completion card. Classes are held from 5:30 p.m. to 9 p.m. Wednesday, Oct. 8 and Monday, Oct. 27. This is not a health care provider course. Cost $55. •Depression.
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HEALTH
Andrea K. Walker | April 16, 2012
The once financially-troubled Bon Secours Baltimore Health System now contributes $226.3 million to the city's economy, a new analysis has found. The analysis, done by Richard Clinch, director of Economic Research at the Jacob France Institute at the University of Baltimore, looked at the economic impact of the hospital's direct services and indirect effects.  It found that Bon Secours supports 1,532 jobs that provide $94 million in annual compensation.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | June 19, 2014
Ruth E. Eger, the former executive director of the Joseph Richey Hospice who lectured widely on death and dying, died June 9 of pneumonia at Saint Agnes Hospital. She had just celebrated her 80th birthday. "Ruth was the most spirited and positive-thinking person. No problem was so big that we couldn't grow and learn from it, and she found that in everybody," said Catherine M. Frome, who was named clinical director of the Joseph Richey Hospice in April. "She turned Joseph Richey Hospice around and made its finances viable in order to care for the underserved in Baltimore," said Ms. Frome.
BUSINESS
By M. William Salganik and M. William Salganik,SUN STAFF | October 1, 1996
Bon Secours Health System has announced the resignation of John L. Fitzgerald, who has overseen the rapidly growing system as its chief executive officer since 1989.Edward Boyer, senior vice president of corporate services for the health system, said Fitzgerald and the board of directors disagreed about the pace of -- but not the need for -- future growth. Christopher M. Carney, a regional vice president, was named acting CEO.Fitzgerald "wanted to take a quantum leap for the next step, while others wanted to be more incremental," Boyer said.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | March 7, 2013
Dr. William R. Law, a retired Baltimore internist whose career at Bon Secours Hospital spanned more than three decades, died Feb. 20 of cancer at Stella Maris Hospice. The longtime West Towson resident was 77. The son of an electrical engineer and a homemaker, William Rawlins Law was born in Baltimore and raised in Rodgers Forge. He was a 1953 graduate of Loyola High School and earned a bachelor's degree in 1957 from what is now Loyola University Maryland. Dr. Law was a 1962 graduate of the University of Maryland School of Medicine and completed both his internship and residency at what is now Mercy Medical Center.
NEWS
May 26, 1993
Bon Secours sisters honoredTwo Baltimore natives, Sister Mary Gemma Neville and Sister Rita Thomas each celebrated 50 years as sisters of Bon Secours last weekend at the order's U.S. provincial headquarters in Marriottsville.Sister Mary is the director of pastoral care and clinical pastoral education at St. Francis Xavier in Charleston, S.C., where she also serves as a member of the board of directors.After graduating from the Bon Secours Hospital School of Nursing in Baltimore, Sister Mary served in nursing positions in Darby and Philadelphia, Methuen, Mass.
NEWS
September 1, 1992
Bon Secours Hospital had just lost $2.5 million and was $5 million in debt four years ago when it began a reappraisal of its role and mission in West Baltimore. The options ranged from closing down the aging campus at Baltimore and Pulaski streets to pushing ahead and expanding in one of the city's poorest neighborhoods.Bon Secours opted for the latter course and is now in the midst of a $24 million rejuvenation drive. An expanded emergency room and a new 90,000 square-foot building housing operating rooms and other care facilities are slated for completion by 1994.
NEWS
May 27, 1993
2 Bon Secours sisters mark 50 yearsTwo Baltimore natives, Sister Mary Gemma Neville and Sister Rita Thomas each celebrated 50 years as sisters of Bon Secours last weekend at the order's U.S. provincial headquarters in Marriottsville.Sister Mary is the director of pastoral care and clinical pastoral education at St. Francis Xavier in Charleston, S.C., where she also serves as a member of the board of directors.After graduating from the Bon Secours Hospital School of Nursing in Baltimore, Sister Mary served in nursing positions in Darby and Philadelphia, Pa., Methuen, Mass.
BUSINESS
October 14, 1993
Eisner wins Black & Decker workEisner & Associates Inc., a Baltimore advertising and public relations company, has won a contract from Black & Decker Corp. to handle the promotion of the company's professional power tools.The Towson-based maker of power tools and appliances said it decided to change agencies to consolidate its advertising, public relations and other promotional functions for the product lines, which include Black & Decker's DeWalt brand and its industrial tools. A Black & Decker executive said the total advertising budget for those products was $7 million a year.
NEWS
By Andy Rosen, The Baltimore Sun | May 18, 2014
Dr. Carolyn R. Haynie, a psychiatrist whose work with underserved children in her hometown of Baltimore became the core of a regional practice, died May 12 of breast cancer . The Mount Washington resident was 65. Raised in the Harlem Park neighborhood of West Baltimore, Dr. Haynie would become the CEO of Urban Behavioral Associates, an Old Goucher psychiatric clinic for children, teens, adults and families. Those who knew Dr. Haynie said she was driven to extend the availability of treatment to children in low-income African-American families, a resource she believed was essential for young people to become successful adults.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,Staff Writer | September 15, 1993
Plowing through painters, cleaners and gardeners yesterday, the Springfield Hospital Center coordinator of volunteer services didn't look the least bit harried.Amid the pandemonium, Betty Jean Maus fielded questions, reeled off instructions and couldn't keep from smiling. She called the daylong effort to renovate Springfield's canteen "an answer to a prayer.""Patients love this canteen, and we want to help them get it back," said Doug, 16, a student volunteer from the Thomas O'Farrell Youth Center who spent hours scrubbing kitchen shelves and cabinets.
FEATURES
By Ellen Hawks and Ellen Hawks,Staff Writer | June 23, 1992
"A hospice volunteer learns a great deal,'' says Elaine Prien of Arnold, who volunteers to the Bon Secours Home Health/Hospice Program.''I am learning that it is all right to just be a person without trying to fit some mold," she says, "and I'm learning how to love a person as he or she is and to affirm, accept and value that person to the last loving moment.''She adds, ''Some people are very accepting of both life and death and they, perhaps, need only medical management for discomfort when facing death.
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