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Bombing Of Hiroshima

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By Arthur Hirsch and Arthur Hirsch,SUN STAFF | September 4, 1996
The former director of the National Air & Space Museum seems at peace with the memory of his own head on a platter. Martin Harwit served it at his boss' request, resigning after a long dispute over a planned exhibit about the atomic bombings of Japan.Some of his adversaries publicly applauded his downfall, others were content to claim a customary spoil of victory: the power to have history told their way.Harwit, an astrophysicist by profession, went home to Washington, disappointed but not bitter.
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NEWS
March 17, 2000
Thomas Wilson Ferebee, 81, the bombardier who dropped the atomic bomb on Hiroshima in World War II, died Thursday in Windermere, Fla. He was 26 on Aug. 6, 1945, a major and a veteran of 64 missions when the B-29 Enola Gay took off for Japan with the first nuclear weapon ever deployed. Mr. Ferebee, who retired from the Air Force as a colonel in 1970, said he never felt guilty but was sorry the bomb killed so many. "I'm sorry an awful lot of people died from that bomb, and I hate to think that something like that had to happen to end the war," he said in a 1995 interview on the 50th anniversary of the bombing.
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NEWS
December 3, 1991
As the 50th anniversary of Pearl Harbor approaches, there have been calls for Japan to apologize for its attack on the United States and for the U.S. to apologize for the bombing of Hiroshima and Nagasaki.The Evening Sun wants to know whether you think Japan should apologize, and whether the U.S. should apologize.Call SUNDIAL, the Baltimore Sun's telephone information system, on a Touch-Tone phone. The call is local, and answers will be registered between 10 a.m. and midnight. The SUNDIAL phone number is 783-1800 or, in Anne Arundel County, 268-7736.
FEATURES
By Arthur Hirsch and Arthur Hirsch,SUN STAFF | September 4, 1996
The former director of the National Air & Space Museum seems at peace with the memory of his own head on a platter. Martin Harwit served it at his boss' request, resigning after a long dispute over a planned exhibit about the atomic bombings of Japan.Some of his adversaries publicly applauded his downfall, others were content to claim a customary spoil of victory: the power to have history told their way.Harwit, an astrophysicist by profession, went home to Washington, disappointed but not bitter.
NEWS
By PETER D. ZIMMERMAN | December 6, 1991
Washington -- Hiroshima and Nagasaki, we are told, balanced the moral scales for the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor. That argument is simplistic and wrong. Even if one sets aside the rape of Nanking, the concentration camps at Singapore and the Bataan death march, the scales are out of balance. American use of nuclear weapons to end the war in the Pacific would balance Pearl Harbor only if Japanese hands were not also contaminated by atomic arms.Until the day of surrender, Japan had an active nuclear-weapons development program, one that is amply documented but conveniently overlooked, allowing the Japanese to paint themselves as the innocent first atomic victims.
NEWS
By Jeff Jacoby | February 10, 1995
TO HEAR Smithsonian Institution Secretary Michael Heyman tell it, all that really marred the exhibit planned for the 50th anniversary of the Enola Gay's bombing of Hiroshima was its ambition.In announcing the exhibit would be scrapped, Mr. Heyman confessed to a "number of regrets," and agreed that the planned exhibit suffered from a "fundamental flaw." But he was not referring to the acrid anti-American philosophy that permeated the curators' script. Or its suggestion that the bombing of Hiroshima was motivated by racism.
NEWS
March 17, 2000
Thomas Wilson Ferebee, 81, the bombardier who dropped the atomic bomb on Hiroshima in World War II, died Thursday in Windermere, Fla. He was 26 on Aug. 6, 1945, a major and a veteran of 64 missions when the B-29 Enola Gay took off for Japan with the first nuclear weapon ever deployed. Mr. Ferebee, who retired from the Air Force as a colonel in 1970, said he never felt guilty but was sorry the bomb killed so many. "I'm sorry an awful lot of people died from that bomb, and I hate to think that something like that had to happen to end the war," he said in a 1995 interview on the 50th anniversary of the bombing.
NEWS
February 6, 1995
Some may say the National Air and Space Museum was caving in to political pressure when it announced its decision last week to scale back its planned exhibit of the Enola Gay, the B-29 bomber that dropped the first atomic bomb on Japan. But that would be too easy.The decision to simply display the famous bomber's fuselage and show a video of its crew was actually a reasonable compromise given the intense and contradictory emotions stirred by America's entry into the nuclear age.This exhibit had been the subject of a heated year-long debate over how the museum would deal with the justification for the bombing and its aftermath.
NEWS
August 6, 1995
No 50th anniversary ever was approached with such mixed feelings as the one that arrives today. A deadly stroke of warfare that would end World War II on favorable terms for the United States and its allies has become for an increasing number of critics over the years an unnecessary act of brutality that left a stain on the American conscience that can never be erased.Some Americans -- at the time -- condemned the decision to drop the first atomic bomb on Hiroshima, Japan, on Aug. 6, 1945.
NEWS
By BOB PROTZMAN | August 13, 1995
St. Paul, Minn. -- There haven't been any A-bomb musical blockbusters over the years, but there have been some pop songs dealing with the dropping of the bomb.Were they serious songs decrying the death and destruction or questioning the morality of the decision to drop it?Uh . . . not quite."They were mostly just tasteless," says St. Paul disc jockey Pete Lee, who has compiled a survey of wide-ranging songs with A-bomb connections."There's a rock 'n' roll sensibility here, a kind of proud ignorance about the bomb in most of these songs.
NEWS
September 24, 1995
Fallston teens' death shouldn't be in vainThe Rothgeb family would like to express their sincere thanks for the overwhelming support and sympathy received from the sheriff's department and the community since the loss of their beloved Eric. The memorial erected, where he was killed, and the letters and cards are greatly appreciated.Sixteen-year-old Eric Rothgeb and his best friend, 18-year-old Christian Leonard, were both tragically killed on June 24 as they walked along the shoulder of Route 152 in Harford County.
NEWS
August 14, 1995
50 Years after HiroshimaYour editorial of Aug. 6 was well done with no attempt to rewrite history nor to condemn President Truman. Others are not as objective.The bomb, right or wrong? Isn't it time we stop this nonsense and conjecture and say something good about America's role in terminating a horrible war and preventing further carnage?Fifty years ago as a Marine machine gunner, I was recovering from being one of the contestants in Hell: Iwo Jima. Like others, I wondered what the reception would be when we invaded Japan.
NEWS
By BOB PROTZMAN | August 13, 1995
St. Paul, Minn. -- There haven't been any A-bomb musical blockbusters over the years, but there have been some pop songs dealing with the dropping of the bomb.Were they serious songs decrying the death and destruction or questioning the morality of the decision to drop it?Uh . . . not quite."They were mostly just tasteless," says St. Paul disc jockey Pete Lee, who has compiled a survey of wide-ranging songs with A-bomb connections."There's a rock 'n' roll sensibility here, a kind of proud ignorance about the bomb in most of these songs.
NEWS
August 11, 1995
The A-BombIn the cover story, ''Was it Necessary?'' of The Sun's Parade section July 30, retired Air Force Maj. Gen. Chuck Sweeney said in a interview about the bombing of Hiroshima and Nagasaki, ''I want Americans to know the facts.'' General Sweeney expresses concern about a ''culture of ignorance'' on many important issues in history and regrets that his own children and grandchildren ''don't know what really took place'' during his World War II missions. As for his family's ignorance of his personal history, I can only wonder why he didn't tell them; but, I share his concern about historical ignorance.
NEWS
August 6, 1995
No 50th anniversary ever was approached with such mixed feelings as the one that arrives today. A deadly stroke of warfare that would end World War II on favorable terms for the United States and its allies has become for an increasing number of critics over the years an unnecessary act of brutality that left a stain on the American conscience that can never be erased.Some Americans -- at the time -- condemned the decision to drop the first atomic bomb on Hiroshima, Japan, on Aug. 6, 1945.
NEWS
By GADDIS SMITH | August 4, 1995
Americans are bitterly divided over the meaning of the atomic bombing of Hiroshima and Nagasaki 50 years ago.The sequence of events is beyond dispute: The U.S. dropped the first bomb on Hiroshima (Aug. 6, 1945); the Soviet Union declared war on Japan (Aug. 8); the U.S. dropped the second bomb on Nagasaki (Aug. 9); Japan offered to surrender oncondition that the imperial throne be preserved (Aug. 10); and the surrender was accepted (Aug. 14).More than 200,000 Japanese, mostly civilians, died in the atomic attack.
NEWS
August 14, 1995
50 Years after HiroshimaYour editorial of Aug. 6 was well done with no attempt to rewrite history nor to condemn President Truman. Others are not as objective.The bomb, right or wrong? Isn't it time we stop this nonsense and conjecture and say something good about America's role in terminating a horrible war and preventing further carnage?Fifty years ago as a Marine machine gunner, I was recovering from being one of the contestants in Hell: Iwo Jima. Like others, I wondered what the reception would be when we invaded Japan.
NEWS
August 11, 1995
The A-BombIn the cover story, ''Was it Necessary?'' of The Sun's Parade section July 30, retired Air Force Maj. Gen. Chuck Sweeney said in a interview about the bombing of Hiroshima and Nagasaki, ''I want Americans to know the facts.'' General Sweeney expresses concern about a ''culture of ignorance'' on many important issues in history and regrets that his own children and grandchildren ''don't know what really took place'' during his World War II missions. As for his family's ignorance of his personal history, I can only wonder why he didn't tell them; but, I share his concern about historical ignorance.
NEWS
By GLENN McNATT | July 15, 1995
I went down to Washington the other day to see the Smithsonian's new exhibit on the Enola Gay, the B-29 bomber that dropped the atomic bomb on Hiroshima.It is an impressive exhibit, though far smaller than the one envisioned before veterans' groups forced the Smithsonian to scrap most of the text and pictures dealing with President Truman's decision to use the bomb, and with the destruction it wrought. The veterans complained that the original exhibit painted the United States as a racist aggressor and made scant mention of Japan's own culpability for the war.As a lifelong airplane buff and sometime pilot, I can pretty much do without the commentary because I am also a former close student of World War II who long ago made up his mind that the decision to use the bomb was probably inevitable given the expected costs of a U.S. invasion of Japan.
NEWS
By Jeff Jacoby | February 10, 1995
TO HEAR Smithsonian Institution Secretary Michael Heyman tell it, all that really marred the exhibit planned for the 50th anniversary of the Enola Gay's bombing of Hiroshima was its ambition.In announcing the exhibit would be scrapped, Mr. Heyman confessed to a "number of regrets," and agreed that the planned exhibit suffered from a "fundamental flaw." But he was not referring to the acrid anti-American philosophy that permeated the curators' script. Or its suggestion that the bombing of Hiroshima was motivated by racism.
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