Advertisement
HomeCollectionsBombing Campaign
IN THE NEWS

Bombing Campaign

FIND MORE STORIES ABOUT:
FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By Tom Bowman and Tom Bowman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | February 15, 1998
WASHINGTON -- Once President Clinton gives the order to attack Iraq, an Air Force pilot will roar off a runway at Al Jaber air base in Kuwait and head west, his F-16CJ fighter outfitted with anti-radar missiles designed to obliterate the air defense system around Baghdad.In the Persian Gulf, at about the same time, a Navy pilot will scramble aboard his F-14 Tomcat, screech off the USS George Washington and bank north toward Iraq, equipped with a new 2,000-pound laser-guided penetrating bomb destined for a chemical weapons facility.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | October 1, 2006
BEIRUT, Lebanon --A ride through the south of Lebanon, across rutted and bombed-out roads, past a landscape of twisted metal and crumbled concrete, reveals little progress toward rebuilding tens of thousands of homes devastated by the 34 days of Israeli bombing that ended more than six weeks ago. Money has begun flowing in, from foreign governments and nongovernmental organizations. But nearly $900 million in international pledges remains untapped by the Lebanese government, whose presence is barely visible in the south.
Advertisement
NEWS
April 16, 1999
NATO has wisely admitted that one of its pilots killed Albanian refugees in a convoy in southwestern Kosovo.Whether it admitted what Belgrade propaganda alleged or something else is unclear. The transcript that NATO released suggests that a pilot was fooled by Serbian use of civilians as shields. But this may not be the last word.The NATO bombing campaign perpetrates its own atrocities. No bombing campaign fails to do that. Innocent Serbs in Serbia may be direct victims and certainly are indirect economic victims.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | August 3, 2006
WASHINGTON -- Most Americans consider Israel's bombing campaign in Lebanon justified, but they are divided over what role the United States should play in the crisis and how closely the U.S. should align itself with the Jewish state, a Los Angeles Times/Bloomberg poll has found. The survey, conducted between Friday and Tuesday, also found that U.S. public opinion on the Middle East situation was evolving, with support for U.S. engagement in the conflict rising steadily along with the death toll - particularly after Sunday's Israeli airstrike that killed dozens of civilians in the southern Lebanon town of Qana.
NEWS
By Tom Bowman and Tom Bowman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | June 16, 1999
WASHINGTON -- With the Pentagon still calculating the cost of the 78-day bombardment of Yugoslavia, a nonpartisan research group estimates that the United States will pay as much as $6.5 billion for the bombing campaign and the first year of peacekeeping.The Center for Strategic and Budgetary Assessments has estimated that the airstrikes cost the United States between $1.8 billion and $3 billion, with an additional $2 billion to $3.5 billion for the 7,000 U.S. troops that will be part of the 50,000-member international peacekeeping force.
NEWS
By David Folkenflik and David Folkenflik,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | May 21, 1999
WASHINGTON -- Three weeks after voting to support the bombing campaign in Yugoslavia, Rep. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. called yesterday for a cease-fire in the Balkans and denounced President Clinton's handling of the conflict.The Baltimore County Republican said the flawed bombing campaign directed by the White House and NATO, which has resulted in the unintended deaths of many civilians, had drained him of patience and prompted his change of position. On April 29, Ehrlich voted with 212 other House members for a resolution supporting the bombing, although he had expressed reservations about Clinton's strategy.
NEWS
By Gilbert A. Lewthwaite and Gilbert A. Lewthwaite,London Bureau of The Sun | February 20, 1991
LONDON -- Scotland Yard angrily rejected yesterday the Irish Republican Army's claims that police were to blame for the death and injuries in Monday's bomb explosion at Victoria Station because they failed to respond to a telephoned warning.Forty minutes before the explosion, a caller with an Irish accent told the London Transport Travel Center that bombs had been placed at all mainline stations.Police decided that the warning -- one of many received daily -- was too vague and too late to sound a public alarm.
NEWS
By Harlan Ullman | April 1, 2003
WASHINGTON - The Bush administration initially expected that Iraq's political and military leadership might quickly collapse when, with some fanfare, the Pentagon unveiled the strategy of "shock and awe" to expedite the rapid disintegration of Saddam Hussein's regime. In his briefings to President Bush's war Cabinet, Gen. Tommy Franks, commander of coalition forces in the war, said shock and awe would combine to offset the numerical superiority of Iraqi forces and stun their leadership into submission.
NEWS
By Karen Hosler and Karen Hosler,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | April 28, 1999
WASHINGTON -- Five weeks into the NATO bombing campaign against Yugoslavia, a substantial and apparently growing band of critics in Congress is calling for an end to U.S. involvement in the conflict.Though not a majority in either house, members of what might be dubbed the "Out Now" caucus represent an unusual bipartisan coalition of isolationists and anti-war legislators whose opposition to the NATO effort is becoming increasing vocal.A House measure calling for an immediate pullout of U.S. forces could draw considerable support today when it comes up for a vote.
NEWS
By Tom Bowman and Mark Matthews and Tom Bowman and Mark Matthews,Sun National Staff | April 7, 1999
WASHINGTON -- President Clinton and NATO leaders yesterday rejected a unilateral cease-fire from Yugoslav President Slobodan Milosevic as insufficient, while the allied bombing campaign expanded to include aircraft strikes from the USS Theodore Roosevelt.But, despite the long-awaited clear weather over Yugoslavia, allied pilots still had trouble targeting Serbian army and police units battling rebel forces and attacking civilians in Kosovo.The Serbian forces were hiding in the dense forests or were shielded by civilians in the towns and cities, military officials said.
NEWS
By Harlan Ullman | April 1, 2003
WASHINGTON - The Bush administration initially expected that Iraq's political and military leadership might quickly collapse when, with some fanfare, the Pentagon unveiled the strategy of "shock and awe" to expedite the rapid disintegration of Saddam Hussein's regime. In his briefings to President Bush's war Cabinet, Gen. Tommy Franks, commander of coalition forces in the war, said shock and awe would combine to offset the numerical superiority of Iraqi forces and stun their leadership into submission.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | March 29, 2003
BAGHDAD, Iraq - Iraqi officials said last night that at least 50 people, many of them women and small children, were killed when a missile or bomb struck a crowded marketplace in an impoverished district of Shiite Muslims in the northwest suburbs of Baghdad. Dozens of others were injured, many of them critically. Survivors said that they had seen the vapor trail of a high-flying aircraft heading toward the south immediately before the blast about 5:30 p.m. Reporters taken to the scene, in the Shula district, 15 miles from central Baghdad, were told by others that seconds before the impact they heard the roar of an engine like that of cruise missiles that have struck Baghdad.
NEWS
By Alan Maimon and By Alan Maimon,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 6, 2000
BERLIN - When they won seats in Parliament for the first time, in 1983, the German Greens strode into the chambers of the Bundestag wearing blue jeans and irreverent grins. The Greens were full of energy but short on practical political vision. They seemed destined to remain, even from the halls of Parliament, consummate outsiders. That has changed. The Greens joined the government of Chancellor Gerhard Schroeder in October 1998. Schroeder's foreign minister is a Green; so is the minister for environment.
NEWS
By Tom Bowman and Tom Bowman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | September 14, 1999
WASHINGTON -- In NATO's bombing campaign in Kosovo, the lack of sophisticated technology among the U.S. allies, the failure to use ground troops and the absence of effective computer warfare prolonged the 78-day conflict and left the United States to do the bulk of the fighting.Moreover, such failings could easily be repeated in future conflicts and must be addressed, according to comments by top defense leaders and reports prepared by NATO commanders and Pentagon officials.Among the top concerns was the ability of President Slobodan Milosevic to spare the destruction of his air defense system by craftily using it for short periods or by simply turning it off. As a result, even the U.S. military's high-tech weapons could not pinpoint his radar and anti-aircraft systems, forcing allied aircraft to fly at higher altitudes to avoid those threats.
NEWS
By Tom Bowman and Tom Bowman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | June 16, 1999
WASHINGTON -- With the Pentagon still calculating the cost of the 78-day bombardment of Yugoslavia, a nonpartisan research group estimates that the United States will pay as much as $6.5 billion for the bombing campaign and the first year of peacekeeping.The Center for Strategic and Budgetary Assessments has estimated that the airstrikes cost the United States between $1.8 billion and $3 billion, with an additional $2 billion to $3.5 billion for the 7,000 U.S. troops that will be part of the 50,000-member international peacekeeping force.
NEWS
By Mark Matthews and Tom Bowman and Mark Matthews and Tom Bowman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | May 25, 1999
WASHINGTON -- Time has all but run out for NATO to invade Yugoslavia and fight a ground war before the start of the Balkan winter, robbing the West of its greatest threat to President Slobodan Milosevic, alliance diplomats and military officials said yesterday.Though President Clinton insisted last week that "we will not take any option off the table," the calendar is making the decision for him, requiring the United States and its NATO allies to rely on bombing and diplomacy to drive Serbian forces out of Kosovo and allow the return of ethnic Albanian refugees.
NEWS
By Mark Matthews and Mark Matthews,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | April 4, 1999
WASHINGTON -- At the end of the air war over Yugoslavia, President Clinton and America's European allies may be forced to accept what none of them now publicly acknowledges: a partition of Kosovo that offers a protected enclave to ethnic Albanians and gives the rest to Serbia.This may offer the only way to avoid three tougher choices, analysts say.One is a ground war requiring tens of thousands of NATO troops to drive President Slobodan Milosevic's forces out of Kosovo.Another is an all-out bombing campaign that hits Yugoslavia's most sensitive targets and Serbia's electrical supply, regardless of the consequences to civilians.
NEWS
By New York Times | January 23, 1991
WASHINGTON -- In Saudi Arabia, the military briefing officer was so careful about sensitive information that he would not say whether it had been good flying weather yesterday.At the White House, Marlin Fitzwater, the president's spokesman, got as many questions about U.S. policy on news from the Persian Gulf as about the progress of the war.After six days of conducting the most intensive bombardment in history, with inconclusive results, the administration is confronting the political problems created by war news as it affects political debate, journalistic analysis and, potentially, public support or opposition.
NEWS
By David Folkenflik and David Folkenflik,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | May 21, 1999
WASHINGTON -- Three weeks after voting to support the bombing campaign in Yugoslavia, Rep. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. called yesterday for a cease-fire in the Balkans and denounced President Clinton's handling of the conflict.The Baltimore County Republican said the flawed bombing campaign directed by the White House and NATO, which has resulted in the unintended deaths of many civilians, had drained him of patience and prompted his change of position. On April 29, Ehrlich voted with 212 other House members for a resolution supporting the bombing, although he had expressed reservations about Clinton's strategy.
NEWS
By Bill Glauber and Tom Bowman and Bill Glauber and Tom Bowman,SUN STAFF | May 3, 1999
BELGRADE, Yugoslavia -- NATO pulled the plug on Belgrade and most of Serbia for nearly eight hours last night with an attack on a major power plant, despite a call to suspend the bombing campaign in appreciation of the release of three American prisoners of war.The strike against the transformer at the coal-fired facility in Obrenovac, 18 miles southwest of Belgrade, plunged up to 70 percent of Serbia into darkness about 10 p.m. Crews restored power to...
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.