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Bolton Hill

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By Marie Marciano Gullard, For The Baltimore Sun | April 11, 2013
Situated in the city's Bolton Hill neighborhood is a relatively new development of brick townhouses solidly placed among the late Victorian and early-20th-century structures that once housed the likes of F. Scott Fitzgerald, Woodrow Wilson and, more recently, pianist Leon Fleisher. This little enclave within an enclave is called Lions Park Fountains. The two-story houses hug the periphery of an open, brick-paved courtyard with benches and fountains. Large statues of lions guard the entrance to the 1980 development.
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NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | March 4, 2013
Gilbert Thornton Renaut, a retired federal attorney who became an Annapolis activist, mayoral candidate and neighborhood problem-solver, died of a heart attack Feb. 27 at his home in the capital's Murray Hill community. He was 66. "Gilbert had an abiding passion for Annapolis," Annapolis Mayor Joshua J. Cohen said in a statement. "His decades-long record of involvement as a civic leader, as a member of numerous boards and commissions, and as a candidate for public office greatly enriched our quality of life.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | February 15, 2013
Anne G. Karlsen, a registered nurse who had worked for the Baltimore County Health Department, died Jan. 25 of heart failure at Gilchrist Hospice Care. She was 86. Anne Bradford Grafflin was born in Baltimore and spent her early years on Wilson Street in Bolton Hill, before moving in 1934 to the Dixon Hill neighborhood in Mount Washington. After graduating from Western High School in 1945, she attended Baltimore Business College and later that year went to work as a mail sorter in the Baltimore & Ohio Railroad's downtown freight office.
FEATURES
By Dave Rosenthal | February 1, 2013
If you want a taste of the Gilded Age, just plunk down $450,000, the asking price for a Baltimore townhouse once owned by F. Scott Fitzgerald. The author who gave us "The Great Gatsby" and other classics lived in Towson and Baltimore while wife Zelda was being treated for her mental health problems. Now the four-bedroom townhouse at 1307 Park Avenue in Bolton Hill is up for sale. Here's what the University of Baltimore's Literary Heritage says about his time here: "In 1932, Fitzgerald brought [Zelda]
NEWS
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | January 31, 2013
It might lack the cachet of Long Island Sound, where novelist S. Scott Fitzgerald set "The Great Gatsby. " But anyone with a spare $450,000 can live in a piece of literary history - specifically the 3,600-square-foot Bolton Hill town home where Fitzgerald lived briefly. The four-bedroom, four-bathroom town home at 1307 Park Ave. is listed by Long & Foster Realtors and went on the market last Saturday. A plaque outside the residence indicates that it once housed Fitzgerald, who stayed there from 1933 until 1935 while his mercurial wife, Zelda, was being treated for schizophrenia at the nearby Sheppard Pratt Hospital.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | December 12, 2012
More than a year ago, police suspected that James Berry III had killed a man during a triple shooting in Bolton Hill, and they presented their evidence to prosecutors. At the time, the case was not deemed strong enough to merit arresting Berry, once a promising boxer with Olympic dreams. It wasn't until last month that detectives got the green light to charge the 25-year-old with murder, after another triple shooting - which left two men dead - focused police attention on him again.
NEWS
By Justin George, The Baltimore Sun | November 30, 2012
A 29-year-old man was shot in the leg in an attempted robbery on Thursday, Baltimore police said. The victim, who police did not identify, told investigators that at about 4:35 p.m. on Thursday, a black man in his 20s wearing a gray jacket approached him on the 300 block of McMechen St. in the Bolton Hill neighborhood. The man informed the victim he aimed to rob him and tried to, prompting a struggle. The victim pushed away and was shot in the leg. Police said the suspect fled while the victim ran to the 1700 block of Eutaw Place, where someone contacted police.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | November 20, 2012
Two people were reported robbed in the same area, and around the same time, Monday night in downtown Baltimore, police confirmed.  It was unclear whether the same group of suspects was involved, a police spokesman said.  In the first incident, a 32-year-old woman said she was walking on the east side of the first block of Hopkins Place at about 10 p.m. when she thrown to the ground from behind by two suspects, believed to be women. They demanded her phone, and ended up taking her purse, police said.  About 30 minutes later, a 17-year-old male said he was walking in the 100 block of W. Lombard St. after getting off of the light rail at Howard and Baltimore streets, and was waiting for a bus, police said.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | November 15, 2012
Baltimore homicide detectives have charged 25-year-old James Berry in a 2011 triple shooting in Bolton Hill that killed a 21-year-old man.  Berry, described by one police commander as a "high roller" because of his suspected connection to violence, was taken into custody in the 1100 block of E. 33rd St. on Wednesday and booked on charges of murder and attempted murder.  The shooting killed 21-year-old Angelo Fitzgerald and injured two others....
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | October 22, 2012
Dr. James Roncie Duke, a retired ophthalmologist and Johns Hopkins pathologist who was a collector of F. Scott Fitzgerald's works and lived in what once was the novelist's Baltimore home, died of complications from dementia Oct. 16 in Bolton Hill. He was 88. Born in Tampa, Fla., he was the son of an ophthalmologist. He attended Plant High School in Tampa and was a 1942 graduate of Staunton Military Academy in Virginia. In an autobiographical essay he wrote for a 50th class reunion at Princeton University, he said, "I wanted a change of scene from the South" when he applied to college.
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