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NEWS
April 5, 1995
Years after the collapse of communism, the Bolshoi Theater, one of its last glory symbols, has finally been freed from authoritarian clutches. Yet the firing of Yuri Grigorovich, the artistic director who ran the theater with an iron hand for three decades, may have been the easy part. Recreating the Bolshoi and returning it to artistic greatness is certain to be much harder in the chaotic conditions of Russia's newly found capitalism and runaway democratization.Just how good was the Bolshoi and its famous ballet in its glory days?
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NEWS
September 3, 2000
THIS SUMMER of calamities can't end soon enough for Russia. First the nuclear submarine catastrophe, then the deadly fire at Moscow's television tower, and now the intervention of President Vladimir Putin to save the Bolshoi theater, symbol of Russian cultural greatness. The Bolshoi has been in critical condition for years. Many of its brightest stars have fled to jobs abroad. At home, its St. Petersburg arch-rival, the Marinsky, has often provided better ballet and opera. Even the landmark's 144-year-old oak pillars are rotting.
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FEATURES
By Michael Specter and Michael Specter,New York Times News Service | August 30, 1994
For what appears to be the first time in the long, famously divisive history of Russian ballet, a jury presented an award for bravery last week: to young Yekaterina Kovmir of the Maryinsky Dance Theater in St. Petersburg. Miss Kovmir received the prize for defying her autocratic bosses and entering the First International Maya Dance Competition.Nobody who knows the histrionic and increasingly intrigue-ridden world of Russian classical dance, which above all means the world of the Bolshoi Ballet and its iron-fisted artistic director, Yuri Grigorovich, doubted that Miss Kovmir earned her award.
NEWS
March 22, 1998
Edward F. Hayes, 56, a Baltimore native who was vice president for research at Ohio State University and president of the university's research foundation, died Friday at his home in a Columbus suburb. He held master's and doctoral degrees from the Johns Hopkins University and came to Ohio State in 1991 from Rice University in Houston, where he was vice president for graduate studies, research and information systems.Galina Ulanova, 88, one of the great ballerinas of the 20th century, diedyesterday in Moscow.
FEATURES
By Kathy Lally and Kathy Lally,Moscow Bureau of The Sun | April 1, 1995
Moscow -- The Kremlin's Italianate walls are only 500 yards from the Grecian columns of the Bolshoi Theater, a proximity that has invited dictator and democrat alike to regard the great hall as if it were his own personal stage.So Russians have found it only natural that President Boris N. Yeltsin has handed out the choice roles himself. Last month he installed Vladimir Vasilyev, a much-admired dancer, as the Bolshoi's artistic director.Mr. Vasilyev, it seems, has only one enemy. That was Yuri Grigorovich, the choreographer who ruled the Bolshoi for 30 years.
NEWS
By Kathy Lally and Kathy Lally,Moscow Bureau of The Sun Sun staff writer Joan Jacobson contributed to this article | March 25, 1995
MOSCOW -- Nearly all of the 2,000 red velvet seats at the Bolshoi Theater were filled yesterday, and the gilt lights were glittering as Vladimir Vasilyev took the stage for the most dramatic role of his career.This time Mr. Vasilyev, once the brightest of the Soviet ballet stars, wore a smartly cut tattersall suit instead of dancing tights. But as he stood before the closed curtain and empty orchestra pit he promised a leap more spectacular than any he had made in "The Nutcracker" or "Don Quixote."
FEATURES
By Sonni Efron and Sonni Efron,LOS ANGELES TIMES | October 16, 1995
ST. PETERSBURG, Russia -- When the curtain rose earlier this month at the Kirov Ballet, the tawny glint of the stage lights on the gilded, ornate theater sent a shiver through an audience that had come hoping the legendary, 212-year-old company, now mired in scandal, could still dazzle.But before the first act of "Don Quixote" was over, the thrill had faded into fidgets.The first dancer on stage, lanky and athletic, flung her long limbs about; the lead danseur justified critics' claims that the Kirov's male contingent is uninspiring.
NEWS
By CLARA GERMANI | August 18, 1996
MOSCOW - On tryout day for the Bolshoi Ballet School, an assembly line of Soviet classical perfection, 9-year-old Irina Zebrova was rejected at first because she was 2 inches too tall.A thousand other little girls that day in 1976 quietly accepted similar fates for being too fat, too short, too stiff - never likely to be good enough for the five-tiered, gold-encrusted crown of Soviet culture, the Bolshoi Theater.But Zebrova did not go quietly. A burst of dramatic tears somehow won her a reprieve - an audition.
NEWS
By Judith Green and Judith Green,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 16, 1997
It's a good thing Natasha Kirjanov remembered the Russian she thought she had forgotten.Kirjanov dances the role of Mina in Ballet Theater of Annapolis' "Dracula," a full-length story ballet that opens this weekend at Maryland Hall for the Creative Arts. The title role is danced by a former member of the Bolshoi Ballet, and he speaks only a little English.So Kirjanov is also translating for Dmitry Tuboltsev, who portrays the Transylvanian count.Though she says her Russian is nothing special, Kirjanov -- born in Massachusetts and the daughter of Russian emigres -- adds that translating is helping her regain fluency.
NEWS
March 22, 1998
Edward F. Hayes, 56, a Baltimore native who was vice president for research at Ohio State University and president of the university's research foundation, died Friday at his home in a Columbus suburb. He held master's and doctoral degrees from the Johns Hopkins University and came to Ohio State in 1991 from Rice University in Houston, where he was vice president for graduate studies, research and information systems.Galina Ulanova, 88, one of the great ballerinas of the 20th century, diedyesterday in Moscow.
NEWS
By Judith Green and Judith Green,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 16, 1997
It's a good thing Natasha Kirjanov remembered the Russian she thought she had forgotten.Kirjanov dances the role of Mina in Ballet Theater of Annapolis' "Dracula," a full-length story ballet that opens this weekend at Maryland Hall for the Creative Arts. The title role is danced by a former member of the Bolshoi Ballet, and he speaks only a little English.So Kirjanov is also translating for Dmitry Tuboltsev, who portrays the Transylvanian count.Though she says her Russian is nothing special, Kirjanov -- born in Massachusetts and the daughter of Russian emigres -- adds that translating is helping her regain fluency.
NEWS
By CLARA GERMANI | August 18, 1996
MOSCOW - On tryout day for the Bolshoi Ballet School, an assembly line of Soviet classical perfection, 9-year-old Irina Zebrova was rejected at first because she was 2 inches too tall.A thousand other little girls that day in 1976 quietly accepted similar fates for being too fat, too short, too stiff - never likely to be good enough for the five-tiered, gold-encrusted crown of Soviet culture, the Bolshoi Theater.But Zebrova did not go quietly. A burst of dramatic tears somehow won her a reprieve - an audition.
FEATURES
By Sonni Efron and Sonni Efron,LOS ANGELES TIMES | October 16, 1995
ST. PETERSBURG, Russia -- When the curtain rose earlier this month at the Kirov Ballet, the tawny glint of the stage lights on the gilded, ornate theater sent a shiver through an audience that had come hoping the legendary, 212-year-old company, now mired in scandal, could still dazzle.But before the first act of "Don Quixote" was over, the thrill had faded into fidgets.The first dancer on stage, lanky and athletic, flung her long limbs about; the lead danseur justified critics' claims that the Kirov's male contingent is uninspiring.
NEWS
April 5, 1995
Years after the collapse of communism, the Bolshoi Theater, one of its last glory symbols, has finally been freed from authoritarian clutches. Yet the firing of Yuri Grigorovich, the artistic director who ran the theater with an iron hand for three decades, may have been the easy part. Recreating the Bolshoi and returning it to artistic greatness is certain to be much harder in the chaotic conditions of Russia's newly found capitalism and runaway democratization.Just how good was the Bolshoi and its famous ballet in its glory days?
FEATURES
By Kathy Lally and Kathy Lally,Moscow Bureau of The Sun | April 1, 1995
Moscow -- The Kremlin's Italianate walls are only 500 yards from the Grecian columns of the Bolshoi Theater, a proximity that has invited dictator and democrat alike to regard the great hall as if it were his own personal stage.So Russians have found it only natural that President Boris N. Yeltsin has handed out the choice roles himself. Last month he installed Vladimir Vasilyev, a much-admired dancer, as the Bolshoi's artistic director.Mr. Vasilyev, it seems, has only one enemy. That was Yuri Grigorovich, the choreographer who ruled the Bolshoi for 30 years.
NEWS
By Kathy Lally and Kathy Lally,Moscow Bureau of The Sun Sun staff writer Joan Jacobson contributed to this article | March 25, 1995
MOSCOW -- Nearly all of the 2,000 red velvet seats at the Bolshoi Theater were filled yesterday, and the gilt lights were glittering as Vladimir Vasilyev took the stage for the most dramatic role of his career.This time Mr. Vasilyev, once the brightest of the Soviet ballet stars, wore a smartly cut tattersall suit instead of dancing tights. But as he stood before the closed curtain and empty orchestra pit he promised a leap more spectacular than any he had made in "The Nutcracker" or "Don Quixote."
NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,Contributing Writer | November 12, 1993
"Why on earth didn't I know that one could write a violoncello concerto like this?" exclaimed Johannes Brahms after his first perusal of Antonin Dvorak's Cello Concerto. "If I had only known, I would have written one long ago!"Brahms was excited for good reason. Introduced in London in 1896, the great Dvorak B-minor quickly became the sine qua non of the cello repertoire.Imbued with lyricism and exuberance, it is, above all, a work that sings.In the hands of a master cellist, a performance of the Dvorak is one of music's great events.
FEATURES
By Anna Kisselgoff and Anna Kisselgoff,New York Times News Service | July 12, 1992
The big sleeper of the Kirov Ballet season was the revival of Leonid Lavrovsky's "Romeo and Juliet," created in 1940.Common wisdom had it that Lavrovsky's remarkable fusion of mime and dancing would look old-fashioned, that this Socialist Realist epic with decadent aristocrats pitted against "the people" could no longer be taken seriously.Surprisingly, this once-controversial treatment of Prokofiev's score (seen in New York with the Bolshoi in 1959) was a superb revelation all over again.
FEATURES
By Michael Specter and Michael Specter,New York Times News Service | August 30, 1994
For what appears to be the first time in the long, famously divisive history of Russian ballet, a jury presented an award for bravery last week: to young Yekaterina Kovmir of the Maryinsky Dance Theater in St. Petersburg. Miss Kovmir received the prize for defying her autocratic bosses and entering the First International Maya Dance Competition.Nobody who knows the histrionic and increasingly intrigue-ridden world of Russian classical dance, which above all means the world of the Bolshoi Ballet and its iron-fisted artistic director, Yuri Grigorovich, doubted that Miss Kovmir earned her award.
NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,Contributing Writer | November 12, 1993
"Why on earth didn't I know that one could write a violoncello concerto like this?" exclaimed Johannes Brahms after his first perusal of Antonin Dvorak's Cello Concerto. "If I had only known, I would have written one long ago!"Brahms was excited for good reason. Introduced in London in 1896, the great Dvorak B-minor quickly became the sine qua non of the cello repertoire.Imbued with lyricism and exuberance, it is, above all, a work that sings.In the hands of a master cellist, a performance of the Dvorak is one of music's great events.
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