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NEWS
December 29, 2005
The recent election of a left-leaning populist as president of Bolivia has worrisome implications for Latin America and for the region's relationship with the United States. Evo Morales, the president-elect, has called President Bush a "terrorist" and pledged to be a "nightmare" for the administration and to end his country's "relationship of submission" with the U.S. He also wants to halt a long-standing and successful coca leaf eradication program between the two countries that has reduced significantly the flow of Bolivian cocaine to the U.S. Mr. Morales has adopted the belligerent, leftist rhetoric of Cuban President Fidel Castro and Venezuelan President Hugo Chavez, who have effectively stoked paranoia about American intentions in Latin America to redirect the anger and dissatisfaction of their mostly poor residents at the U.S. Bolivia is South America's poorest country; most of its 9 million people earn less than $1 a day. While these three countries pose no significant threat to the United States, other Latin American countries are also turning leftward, and 12 presidential elections are slated to take place in the region in the coming year.
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NEWS
By From Sun news services | September 17, 2008
1,445 Afghan civilians killed so far this year 4 KABUL, Afghanistan: The United Nations said yesterday that 1,445 Afghan civilians have been killed so far this year by insurgents or U.S.- and NATO-led forces - a 40 percent increase over 2007. Exactly 800 of the deaths, 55 percent, were caused by Taliban fighters and other insurgents, the U.N. report said. It said that was almost double the 462 civilian deaths attributed to anti-government fighters in the first seven months of last year.
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NEWS
October 27, 2003
THIS MONTH, the World Bank issued a report on inequality in Latin America. Among its findings, the study offered this snapshot of Bolivia: The poorest 10 percent of the country's 9 million people earned 0.3 percent of total per capita income in 1999, while the richest 10 percent received 42.3 percent. That disparity lies at the heart of the recent mass protests by Bolivia's indigenous poor that led to the forced resignation last week of President Gonzalo Sanchez de Lozada. A proposal to export natural gas to the United States and Mexico via Chile ignited the street demonstrations that brought thousands to the capital.
FEATURES
October 9, 2007
Oct. 9 1967 Latin American guerrilla leader Che Guevara was executed while trying to incite revolution in Bolivia.
NEWS
By Chicago Tribune | March 15, 1992
LA PAZ, Bolivia -- A bachelor says he needs help finding a wife. Another man says his new refrigerator must be blessed. A third wants to bring his house good luck. A fourth is short of cash.They all are shopping at La Paz's Mercado de Brujas, or Witches Market, where dreams come true the old-fashioned way -- through the spirits."The gods are powerful. If you give them something, they will give you something in return," said Marta Guarachi, 35, one of the market's dozen or so witches, whose curbside stall includes everything from incense, minerals and herbs to multicolored candies, statues of frogs and llama fetuses.
NEWS
By James Langman and James Langman,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 5, 2000
CHUSPIPATA, Bolivia -- At the summit of the harrowing one-lane Unduavi-Yolosa highway, some Bolivian drivers seek to ensure their safe passage by chewing coca leaves and sprinkling a local brandy on the road as an offering to pachamama, Mother Earth. The road hugs the cliffs of the Andean mountain range as it descends nearly 11,800 feet from Bolivia's capital, La Paz, into the lush tropical jungles of the northern Yungas region. Dubbed by the Inter-American Development Bank "the world's most dangerous road," the highway has claimed thousands of lives.
NEWS
By PATRICK J. MCDONNELL and PATRICK J. MCDONNELL,LOS ANGELES TIMES | January 23, 2006
LA PAZ, Bolivia -- Evo Morales, who rose from rural poverty to become a crusader for disenfranchised Indians and a fierce critic of U.S. policy, was sworn in yesterday as the first indigenous president of this impoverished Andean nation. "The 500 years of Indian resistance have not been in vain," Morales declared in his inaugural speech in the government palace as thousands watching on a giant screen outside cheered. "From 500 years of resistance, we pass to another 500 years in power."
SPORTS
September 25, 2006
When you're the president, you do get certain advantages. Evo Morales, president of Bolivia, is an avid soccer player. He recently played in a match against other politicians and scored on a penalty kick in his team's 5-0 victory. Morales' side did have somewhat of an edge - his team included members of his security detail and retired players from Bolivia's 1994 World Cup squad. Morales tried to get some other South American presidents to play - Hugo Chavez of Venezuela, Luiz Inacio Lula da Silva of Brazil and Nestor Kirchner of Argentina - but they all declined.
NEWS
By PATRICK J. MCDONNELL and PATRICK J. MCDONNELL,LOS ANGELES TIMES | December 18, 2005
LA PAZ, Bolivia -- With the presidential election hours away, the leading candidate is Evo Morales, a charismatic champion of the peasant producers of coca leaf - the raw ingredient in cocaine - and a devoted acolyte of Venezuelan President Hugo Chavez, South America's premier critic of the United States. If elected, Morales, 46, would be the first Indian president in a nation where long-marginalized indigenous groups have focused their rage on multinational corporations and economic and anti-drug policies backed by the United States.
NEWS
By Christian Science Monitor | February 3, 1991
LA PAZ, Bolivia -- Improving the dire living conditions endured by many Bolivian children is the aim of an unprecedented plan to swap a quarter of the country's commercial bank debt for programs to aid children and preserve Bolivian culture.The U.S. Agency for International Development and two private agencies, Save the Children Federation and Foster Parents Plan, are expected to donate $5 million to $10 million to help finance the plan. This money will be used to buy back at least $45 million of Bolivian debt on the secondary market, where its value is 11 cents on the dollar.
NEWS
By Letta Tayler and Letta Tayler,NEWSDAY | October 27, 2006
UNITED NATIONS -- Guatemala and U.S. foe Venezuela failed to break an impasse over their competition for a U.N. Security Council seat yesterday, with each side blaming the other for the stalemate. After a closed-door meeting, the two nations' foreign ministers said neither country had agreed to withdraw in favor of a consensus candidate, despite indications earlier in the week that they might do so. "We are not prepared to step down," Guatemalan Ambassador Gert Rosenthal said after the talks.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly | October 24, 2006
Sister Teresa Feeley, a Baltimore-born missionary nurse and hospital administrator who headed the Daughters of Charity in Bolivia, died of cancer yesterday at St. Agnes Hospital. She was 74. Teresa Martin Feeley was raised on Guilford Avenue and she attended SS. Philip and James Parochial School and was a 1950 graduate of Notre Dame Preparatory School. She earned a degree from Mercy Hospital's School of Nursing. She later received a master's degree from Catholic University of America. She was one of three sisters who entered Roman Catholic religious orders.
SPORTS
September 25, 2006
When you're the president, you do get certain advantages. Evo Morales, president of Bolivia, is an avid soccer player. He recently played in a match against other politicians and scored on a penalty kick in his team's 5-0 victory. Morales' side did have somewhat of an edge - his team included members of his security detail and retired players from Bolivia's 1994 World Cup squad. Morales tried to get some other South American presidents to play - Hugo Chavez of Venezuela, Luiz Inacio Lula da Silva of Brazil and Nestor Kirchner of Argentina - but they all declined.
NEWS
By Letta Tayler and Letta Tayler,Newsday | September 21, 2006
UNITED NATIONS -- Bringing his verbal war against the White House to the United Nations yesterday, Venezuela's President Hugo Chavez branded President Bush "the devil" and the United States an "imperialist empire" on the verge of collapse. "The devil came here yesterday ... talking as if he owns the world," the flamboyant leftist said from the floor of the General Assembly, making the sign of the cross. "It still smells of sulfur." Bush came to "preserve the current pattern of domination, exploitation and pillaging," Chavez continued as he waved a copy of leftist intellectual Noam Chomsky's book Hegemony or Survival: America's Quest for Global Dominance.
NEWS
April 4, 2006
Bush administration officials will be closely watching presidential elections Sunday in Peru, where the frontrunner is a populist, left-leaning candidate who has aligned himself with the equally leftist presidents of Bolivia and Venezuela, both harsh critics of the U.S. and of American foreign policy in Latin America. With his unapologetic condemnation of Washington's "imperialist exploitation," Ollanta Humala, a former army officer, has made clear that he too has adopted the anti-American rhetoric of Bolivia's newly elected president Evo Morales and Venezuela's Hugo Chavez, who U.S. officials believe had an influential hand in both Peru's and Bolivia's presidential campaigns and is a serious threat to regional stability.
NEWS
March 23, 2006
12 Americans killed in Chile as bus plunges down mountain SANTIAGO, Chile -- A bus carrying cruise ship tourists plunged 300 feet down a mountainside in northern Chile yesterday, killing 12 Americans, U.S. and Chilean officials said. Two other Americans and two Chileans - the driver and the tour guide - were hospitalized in serious condition after the crash along a rugged highway near the Pacific port city of Arica, 1,250 miles north of Santiago, said Juan Carlos Poli, an Arica city hall spokesman.
FEATURES
By Christopher Reynolds and Christopher Reynolds,LOS ANGELES TIMES | March 10, 1996
Dust and dirt is all you see, then you see nothing. And then the nothing fades and a stagecoach roars into the distance, and three fugitives stand there, taking the measure of a dismal high-plains landscape. This is about halfway through "Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid," and the fugitives are Butch, Sundance and Etta, the schoolteacher, who have decided to once and for all lose that persistent posse.They have gone far south. To give the director a sense of how this new place should look, screenwriter William Goldman offered this shorthand description: "Horrid little low adobe huts stretch out and an occasional pig grunts by."
NEWS
By PATRICK J. MCDONNELL and PATRICK J. MCDONNELL,LOS ANGELES TIMES | December 19, 2005
LA PAZ, Bolivia -- Citizens of this deeply divided Andean nation went to the polls yesterday in a bitter election featuring a leftist presidential hopeful who has vowed to torpedo U.S. anti-drug efforts here and be a "nightmare" for Washington. Unofficial results from several exit polls indicated that Evo Morales, the leftist, had garnered as much as 45 percent of the vote, well ahead of his principal challenger, former President Jorge "Tuto" Quiroga, who the polls suggested had garnered about a third of the vote.
NEWS
By PATRICK J. MCDONNELL and PATRICK J. MCDONNELL,LOS ANGELES TIMES | January 23, 2006
LA PAZ, Bolivia -- Evo Morales, who rose from rural poverty to become a crusader for disenfranchised Indians and a fierce critic of U.S. policy, was sworn in yesterday as the first indigenous president of this impoverished Andean nation. "The 500 years of Indian resistance have not been in vain," Morales declared in his inaugural speech in the government palace as thousands watching on a giant screen outside cheered. "From 500 years of resistance, we pass to another 500 years in power."
NEWS
By GARY MARX and GARY MARX,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | December 31, 2005
HAVANA -- Bolivia's President-elect Evo Morales arrived in Cuba yesterday on his first overseas trip since winning a landslide victory that shifts the political tide in Latin America further leftward. Greeted at the airport in Havana by Cuban President Fidel Castro, Morales expressed joy at being in Cuba and described his two-day visit here as a show of "friendship for the Cuban people." Castro called the Dec. 18 victory by Morales, a stanch U.S. opponent and Bolivia's first indigenous president, "something extraordinary, something historic."
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