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NEWS
By Anne Haddad and Anne Haddad,SUN STAFF | June 3, 1999
In the most American-pie corner of Carroll County, who would expect senior citizens to be experimenting with bok choy, fennel gratin and tofu chocolate pudding?Dietitian Eleanor Pella is pleasantly surprised to find more than a dozen elders every month waiting for her to put some razzle dazzle alongside the chicken rice casserole and bran muffins that are standard fare at Taneytown Senior Center.In May, Pella introduced them to "Uncommonly Good Fruits and Vegetables" -- a guide to some of the unusual offerings in the produce department.
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NEWS
By Jonathan Pitts, The Baltimore Sun | June 10, 2011
She runs a chic boutique a few blocks from Capitol Hill during the week, but this time of year, when Saturdays roll around, you'll find dyed-in-the-wool Washingtonian Debbie Danielson among those who work with the soil, not in a salon. "We travel an hour for this lettuce," Danielson said recently at the Annapolis Freshfarm Market, several pounds of the fresh green stuff poking out of the plastic bags in her hands. "This is the most amazing food for the money. Do you see this? It's all under $20. " Danielson was one of dozens of regulars at the weekly outdoor market — and one of hundreds who visited the six major farmers' markets already open in Anne Arundel this past week — as the produce-stravaganzas swung into a new season in locations from the parking lot at Westfield Mall to the Piney Orchard Community Center in Odenton.
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NEWS
By Craig Timberg and Craig Timberg,SUN STAFF | August 17, 1996
Maybe it's his Vuarnet sunglasses, but everywhere Philip Gottwals looks in western Howard County he imagines fields of bok choy, gardens of ginseng, rows of wine grapes ripening in the summer sun.He sees local farmers -- something of an endangered species as suburbia rolls relentlessly west -- cashing in on Howard County's most reliable crop: yuppies."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Karen Nitkin and Karen Nitkin,special to the sun | September 22, 2005
I'm always glad to see locally owned restaurants among the chains in the Inner Harbor. One appealing new quick-meal option on Pier 4 is Blu Bambu, owned by Gaithersburg-based Charlie Chiang's, which already runs several full-service Chinese restaurants in Virginia and Washington, as well as Kwai, a new venue at BWI's main food court. Charlie Chiang's has been in business since 1976, and with all that experience, you'd expect Blu Bambu to feel professional. It does. The space is clean and sunny, and the service is so efficient that nobody stands around for long, even when the place is bustling, as it was on a recent weekday.
NEWS
By Anne Haddad and Anne Haddad,SUN STAFF | June 3, 1999
In the most American-pie corner of Carroll County, who would expect senior citizens to be experimenting with bok choy, fennel gratin and tofu chocolate pudding?Dietitian Eleanor Pella is pleasantly surprised to find more than a dozen elders every month waiting for her to put some razzle dazzle alongside the chicken rice casserole and bran muffins that are standard fare at Taneytown Senior Center.In May, Pella introduced them to "Uncommonly Good Fruits and Vegetables" -- a guide to some of the unusual offerings in the produce department.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | September 4, 1997
CALVERTON, N.Y. - With the push of a button, Jack Van de Wetering, the largest producer of greenhouse plants in the New York metropolitan region, can rotate his entire crop of 10 million plants in just one hour."
NEWS
By Betty Rosbottom and Betty Rosbottom,Los Angeles Times Syndicate | January 21, 2001
Occasionally, when I invite friends for dinner, a guest will remind me (in a polite but insistent manner) that he or she is on a low-fat diet. The strong, assertive flavors and interesting textures of Artic Char with Bok Choy, Garlic and Ginger meets these criteria. The delectable bok choy, still somewhat crisp, made a fine garnish for the tender, flaky arctic char fillets imbued with the salty taste of soy and complemented by the mild acidity of rice vinegar. To accompany this entree, you could serve rice drizzled with toasted sesame oil and sprinkled with chives and offer poached pears scented with fragrant spices for dessert.
FEATURES
By William Rice and William Rice,Chicago Tribune | June 5, 1994
Its admirable nutritional content aside (lots of vitamin A, vitamin C and fiber), the green cabbage remains much unloved, a nerd among vegetables. Cabbage can be wonderful, but this possibility is emphatically rejected by those who have come to dislike the unpleasant odor of boiled-to-death cabbage or the extremes of its texture -- coarse, when tough outer leaves are chopped up for a slaw, or watery and slimy, when left too long on a steam table.So instead of trying to change your minds, I'll try to change your focus: On your next shopping trip, consider a Chinese cabbage.
NEWS
By Ellen Hawks and Ellen Hawks,SUN STAFF | September 10, 2003
Jessi Thomas of Ellicott City requested a recipe for chicken chow mein made "with onions, veggies, bean sprouts, whatever." Said Thomas: "I can't find any recipes at all." Kathy Knowlton of Winterville, N.C., responded with a recipe that she found "in Treasury of Light Cooking by Publications International Ltd., 1994." Added Knowlton: "I have used spaghetti [the non-purist way], and it was still great!" Chicken Chow Mein Serves 4 to 6 6 ounces uncooked fresh Chinese egg noodles 1/2 cup low-salt chicken broth 2 tablespoons reduced-salt soy sauce 1 1/2 teaspoons cornstarch 1/2 teaspoon Oriental sesame oil 1/2 teaspoon ground black pepper 1/8 teaspoon Chinese five-spice powder 6 ounces boneless chicken breast, coarsely chopped 2 green onions, sliced 2 cups thinly sliced bok choy 1 1/2 cups mixed frozen vegetables, thawed and drained 1 8-ounce can sliced water chestnuts, drained and rinsed 1 cup fresh bean sprouts Preheat oven to 400 degrees.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Karen Nitkin and Karen Nitkin,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 26, 2003
Walk down the narrow, steep steps that lead to Nam Kang, and enter another world - a world where tofu is not health food and where some of the most intriguing dishes are the ones that come free with the meal. The best thing to do is sit back and enjoy the ride. The restaurant serves Japanese, Korean and Chinese dishes, but the multipage menu, divided by cuisine, tells only part of the story. Shortly after we ordered, bowl upon bowl of Korean-style appetizers appeared. These were not listed on the menu and were given free of charge, and they ranged from fiery slices of bok choy to bland rectangles of tofu.
NEWS
By Suzanne White and Suzanne White,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 21, 2004
Tonight, MacDuff Stewart will race the clock, mincing and chopping as she prepares her traditional Chinese New Year's dumplings. What's the rush? An ancient Chinese custom that forbids touching sharp objects on New Year's Day. It's bad luck. So if friends want to enjoy her savory dumplings tomorrow when the holiday kicks off, she'd better get chopping. Stewart, 25, a Michigan native with a passion for all things Asian, has been celebrating the Chinese New Year since she was in college.
NEWS
By Ellen Hawks and Ellen Hawks,SUN STAFF | September 10, 2003
Jessi Thomas of Ellicott City requested a recipe for chicken chow mein made "with onions, veggies, bean sprouts, whatever." Said Thomas: "I can't find any recipes at all." Kathy Knowlton of Winterville, N.C., responded with a recipe that she found "in Treasury of Light Cooking by Publications International Ltd., 1994." Added Knowlton: "I have used spaghetti [the non-purist way], and it was still great!" Chicken Chow Mein Serves 4 to 6 6 ounces uncooked fresh Chinese egg noodles 1/2 cup low-salt chicken broth 2 tablespoons reduced-salt soy sauce 1 1/2 teaspoons cornstarch 1/2 teaspoon Oriental sesame oil 1/2 teaspoon ground black pepper 1/8 teaspoon Chinese five-spice powder 6 ounces boneless chicken breast, coarsely chopped 2 green onions, sliced 2 cups thinly sliced bok choy 1 1/2 cups mixed frozen vegetables, thawed and drained 1 8-ounce can sliced water chestnuts, drained and rinsed 1 cup fresh bean sprouts Preheat oven to 400 degrees.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Karen Nitkin and Karen Nitkin,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 26, 2003
Walk down the narrow, steep steps that lead to Nam Kang, and enter another world - a world where tofu is not health food and where some of the most intriguing dishes are the ones that come free with the meal. The best thing to do is sit back and enjoy the ride. The restaurant serves Japanese, Korean and Chinese dishes, but the multipage menu, divided by cuisine, tells only part of the story. Shortly after we ordered, bowl upon bowl of Korean-style appetizers appeared. These were not listed on the menu and were given free of charge, and they ranged from fiery slices of bok choy to bland rectangles of tofu.
NEWS
By Betty Rosbottom and Betty Rosbottom,Los Angeles Times Syndicate | January 21, 2001
Occasionally, when I invite friends for dinner, a guest will remind me (in a polite but insistent manner) that he or she is on a low-fat diet. The strong, assertive flavors and interesting textures of Artic Char with Bok Choy, Garlic and Ginger meets these criteria. The delectable bok choy, still somewhat crisp, made a fine garnish for the tender, flaky arctic char fillets imbued with the salty taste of soy and complemented by the mild acidity of rice vinegar. To accompany this entree, you could serve rice drizzled with toasted sesame oil and sprinkled with chives and offer poached pears scented with fragrant spices for dessert.
NEWS
By Anne Haddad and Anne Haddad,SUN STAFF | June 3, 1999
In the most American-pie corner of Carroll County, who would expect senior citizens to be experimenting with bok choy, fennel gratin and tofu chocolate pudding?Dietitian Eleanor Pella is pleasantly surprised to find more than a dozen elders every month waiting for her to put some razzle dazzle alongside the chicken rice casserole and bran muffins that are standard fare at Taneytown Senior Center.In May, Pella introduced them to "Uncommonly Good Fruits and Vegetables" -- a guide to some of the unusual offerings in the produce department.
NEWS
By Anne Haddad and Anne Haddad,SUN STAFF | June 3, 1999
In the most American-pie corner of Carroll County, who would expect senior citizens to be experimenting with bok choy, fennel gratin and tofu chocolate pudding?Dietitian Eleanor Pella is pleasantly surprised to find more than a dozen elders every month waiting for her to put some razzle dazzle alongside the chicken rice casserole and bran muffins that are standard fare at Taneytown Senior Center.In May, Pella introduced them to "Uncommonly Good Fruits and Vegetables" -- a guide to some of the unusual offerings in the produce department.
FEATURES
By Jana Sanchez-Klein and Jana Sanchez-Klein,Contributing Writer | February 1, 1995
It looks just like an international produce market in Marrakech, Shanghai or Caracas. Displayed in glorious jumbles of color are tropical fruits, bottle-shaped gourds, scaly cucumbers, small, round, green eggplants, dark hairy roots, and even prickly cactus leaves.As grocery stores owners discover that a great variety of exotic produce will attract a loyal clientele, greater numbers are entering the previously ignored domain of specialty Asian and Hispanic produce. Not only does this produce draw customers who use it in their traditional cooking, but also those adventurous souls always looking for new culinary thrills.
NEWS
By Suzanne White and Suzanne White,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 21, 2004
Tonight, MacDuff Stewart will race the clock, mincing and chopping as she prepares her traditional Chinese New Year's dumplings. What's the rush? An ancient Chinese custom that forbids touching sharp objects on New Year's Day. It's bad luck. So if friends want to enjoy her savory dumplings tomorrow when the holiday kicks off, she'd better get chopping. Stewart, 25, a Michigan native with a passion for all things Asian, has been celebrating the Chinese New Year since she was in college.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | September 4, 1997
CALVERTON, N.Y. - With the push of a button, Jack Van de Wetering, the largest producer of greenhouse plants in the New York metropolitan region, can rotate his entire crop of 10 million plants in just one hour."
NEWS
By Craig Timberg and Craig Timberg,SUN STAFF | August 17, 1996
Maybe it's his Vuarnet sunglasses, but everywhere Philip Gottwals looks in western Howard County he imagines fields of bok choy, gardens of ginseng, rows of wine grapes ripening in the summer sun.He sees local farmers -- something of an endangered species as suburbia rolls relentlessly west -- cashing in on Howard County's most reliable crop: yuppies."
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