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November 16, 1990
OLYMPIC GOLD medalists Brian Boitano and Katarina Witt are coming to the Baltimore Arena Tuesday, stopping here to entertain as part of their new national skating tour.Before they arrive, Accent will be providing Baltimore-area children a chance to ask either skater a question by calling SUNDIAL, the free telephone information service of The Baltimore Sun.Our Gold Line to Boitano and Witt will be open this weekend from noon Friday until noon Saturday. Using a touch-tone phone, call 783-1800.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | September 23, 2013
The Food for Thought stage at the Baltimore Book Festival will present a full slate of talks and demonstrations by Baltimore-based chefs and visiting cookbook authors. Among the locals are Johnny's barista Lindsay DiFabbio (1 p.m. Friday), caterer and former restaurateur Connie Crabtree-Burritt (noon Saturday) and Bradley Willits, executive chef at the B&O American Brasserie (noon Sunday). The most recognizable names among the visiting authors are not necessarily associated with the world of cooking.
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SPORTS
By Sandra McKee and Sandra McKee,Staff Writer | December 14, 1992
LANDOVER -- Brian Boitano sat nervously on a table in the hallway outside the locker room, trying to retain his focus on his program. It wasn't easy. The Zamboni ice-smoothing machine had broken down, and the four-time professional world champion was being asked to hold that thought a little longer."
SPORTS
By Philip Hersh and Tribune Newspapers | February 19, 2010
Evan Lysacek's coach, Frank Carroll, had one major hope for his skater going into Thursday's Olympic free skate final. "I want him to grab this opportunity and make it something special," Carroll said, "because so few skaters have this chance." Lysacek did all that and more at the Pacific Coliseum. Shaking off the suffocating pressure of the moment -- which actually lasted four minutes, 30 seconds -- Lysacek delivered a brilliant, career-best performance to become the first U.S. man to win the Olympic skating gold medal since Brian Boitano in 1988.
SPORTS
By Susan Reimer | December 5, 1990
What is Brian Boitano up to these days?Funny you should ask.Make that, funny you should see.The young man whose charisma and athleticism won him a gold medal at the 1988 Winter Olympics is changing. He still cuts that Errol Flynn figure on the ice.But he's also getting funnier.Not guffaw funny. You won't be slapping your knee at baggy clown pants or pratfalls on the ice.Boitano's humor is in character: elusive, sophisticated, slightly self-deprecating. It is just the kind of humor you would expect from Boitano.
SPORTS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,Sun Staff Writer | February 13, 1994
LILLEHAMMER, Norway -- Brian Boitano has seen the bright lights of the ice show circuit from New York to Paris.He has skated with Katarina Witt, performed in prime-time television specials, earned millions for turning triple jumps on a dime, night after night, year after year.But on the whole, this is where he would rather be, in another Winter Olympics, testing his skills and his courage against another generation of would-be figure skating kings."I wouldn't be here if I didn't think I could win," Boitano said.
SPORTS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,Staff Writer | January 6, 1994
DETROIT -- This is how a professional takes a lead.On a night when he appeared nervous, when he almost botched his first triple jump and had trouble connecting with an audience while performing a waltz, Brian Boitano showed skaters nearly 10 years his junior what it takes to compete under pressure.Just grit and bear it.Boitano warded off the shakes and won round one of the U.S. Figure Skating Championships by taking the lead in last night's technical program, worth 33.3 percent of the overall score.
SPORTS
By Susan Reimer and Susan Reimer,Sun Staff Correspondent | December 8, 1991
LANDOVER -- Brian Boitano strung together a batch of his trademark triples and made it a quadruple -- a fourth straight men's title at the NutraSweet World Professional Figure Skating Championships.And it was his hardest-fought title, as Scott Hamilton and Robin Cousins -- gold medalists who had been eclipsed by Boitano -- cut him no quarter."It really means a lot to me," said Boitano, who edged Hamilton by seven-tenths and Cousins by eight-tenths of a point out of a possible 100 points.And it did it with the quick-footed fun-packed style that they have made their own."
FEATURES
By Peter Krask and Peter Krask,Special to The Evening Sun | November 21, 1990
Courtney Winer, an 8-year-old student at Pot Spring Elementary School in Timonium, cut right to the chase.She used The Evening Sun's call-in line to ask a simple question of celebrity ice-skaters Brian Boitano and Katarina Witt: "Has skating been worth the things you gave up in your childhood and teen-age years?"Boitano and Witt, who brought their show, "Skating II," to the Baltimore Arena last night, more than agreed that their sacrifices have been well-rewarded. Boitano is even reluctant to admit that he made sacrifices.
SPORTS
By Sandra McKee and Sandra McKee,Sun Staff Writer | December 11, 1994
LANDOVER -- Brian Boitano finished off the fall season last night with a title-clinching performance in the COMPLETE World Professional Figure Skating Championships."
SPORTS
By CANDUS THOMSON and CANDUS THOMSON,SUN REPORTER | February 7, 2006
Now, men view glitter as paving way to gold On the subject of figure-skating costumes, Olympic champion Scott Hamilton has one hard-and-fast rule: "The pants must stretch." For fellow gold medalist Brian Boitano, "It must be masculine." But Timothy Goebel, the 2002 bronze medalist, rarely gets involved in the costumes he wears. "It's not like this is the Oscars. It doesn't matter. No one is looking at what I'm wearing." But they do look and it does matter. All that glitters is not gold in Olympic men's figure skating.
SPORTS
By Don Markus and Don Markus,SUN STAFF | December 10, 1995
LANDOVER -- Kurt Browning of Canada and Yuka Sato of Japan came into this year's NutraSweet World Professional Figure Skating Championships with about the same kind of expectations for victory: none.Browning, a former four-time world amateur champion, had to beat Brian Boitano, who had won this event six of the past seven years. Sato figured she had to beat two Americans, Kristi Yamaguchi and Nancy Kerrigan, as well as win over the crowd at USAir Arena.Guess what happened.With a near-perfect artistic program performed to the Commodores' hit, "Brick House," the 29-year-old Browning interrupted Boitano's reign.
SPORTS
By Sandra McKee and Sandra McKee,Sun Staff Writer | December 11, 1994
LANDOVER -- Brian Boitano finished off the fall season last night with a title-clinching performance in the COMPLETE World Professional Figure Skating Championships."
SPORTS
By George Vecsey and George Vecsey,N.Y. Times News Service | February 21, 1994
HAMAR, Norway -- Welcome to the Rink of Dreams. If you build it, they will come. Welcome to the very temporary home of the world's greatest collection of masters figure skaters.Back from the mists come the hallowed names from those distant days of the eighties, when yuppies were young: Torvill and Dean, Witt and Boitano.But the Old Boys and the Old Girls are finding it not so easy to waltz back into the Olympic movement and collect the medals and the standing ovations that used to belong to them.
SPORTS
By JOHN EISENBERG | February 20, 1994
HAMAR, Norway -- "It's not a story about age, it's a story about an injury," Brian Boitano was saying last night, putting his spin on his sixth-place finish in the Olympic skating competition.It was a story about both, however. About an injury, yes. But also very much about age.There was just no getting around it on a night when the gold medalist was 20, the silver medalist was 21 and the bronze medalist was 22, and Boitano, 30, wound up peering through a curtain to watch them get their medals.
SPORTS
By RAY FRAGER | February 18, 1994
Maybe because it had been so widely reported -- including by CBS -- that Brian Boitano was going to lead off the men's figure skating short programs, CBS couldn't delay his appearance last night.So Boitano was the first skater we saw -- and the first we saw stumble.Afterward, he was shown a replay of his missed jump and asked to explain. Boitano said that, while he was in the air, he wasn't thinking technical thoughts (which I think was Peter Pan's secret)."When I was going into it," Boitano said, "I was thinking, 'Land it, land it.' "Analyst Scott Hamilton had a less psychological explanation for the stumble.
SPORTS
By Phil Jackman | February 18, 1994
The TV Repairman:Someone, probably Coroebus, first winner of a gold medal 2,870 years ago, once uttered, "This is the Olympics, anything can happen."How true, how true."
SPORTS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,Staff Writer | March 30, 1993
Coming to the rescue of U.S. figure skating: Brian Boitano.Yesterday, the 1988 Olympic men's skating gold medalist announced that he was applying for his international reinstatement in a bid to compete at the 1994 Winter Games of Lillehammer, Norway.Although Boitano's announcement was expected, it was a necessary first step on the road to Norway. The International Skating Union, the sport's governing body, is expected to reinstate Boitano this summer."It's no secret that I have already had this in my mind," Boitano said.
SPORTS
By Phil Jackman | February 18, 1994
The TV Repairman:Someone, probably Coroebus, first winner of a gold medal 2,870 years ago, once uttered, "This is the Olympics, anything can happen."How true, how true."
SPORTS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,Sun Staff Writer | February 13, 1994
LILLEHAMMER, Norway -- Brian Boitano has seen the bright lights of the ice show circuit from New York to Paris.He has skated with Katarina Witt, performed in prime-time television specials, earned millions for turning triple jumps on a dime, night after night, year after year.But on the whole, this is where he would rather be, in another Winter Olympics, testing his skills and his courage against another generation of would-be figure skating kings."I wouldn't be here if I didn't think I could win," Boitano said.
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