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By Jerelyn Eddings and Jerelyn Eddings,Johannesburg Bureau | July 5, 1992
BOIPATONG, South Africa -- As the sun goes down, the barricades go up in this dusty little township, revealing the battle zone that Boipatong has become.Tree trunks and stones are dragged to the entrance of virtually every dirt street, making it difficult for attackers to come by car or truck.The boys of the township, known locally as "comrades," become the watchmen for the community. They put down their schoolbooks and take up rocks as weapons for their all-night patrols."We don't have guns.
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NEWS
By Jerelyn Eddings and Jerelyn Eddings,Johannesburg Bureau | August 18, 1992
JOHANNESBURG, South Africa -- Something is happening in South Africa that has rarely happened before: The police are being forced to answer charges that they slaughtered innocent blacks.In an extraordinary public forum, a half-dozen black witnesses have come forward this month to charge that police were present and in some cases played an active role in one of the most horrible massacres here in recent times.The investigation of the Boipatong massacre of June 17, when more than 40 people were slain in their homes, has had a profound impact on the image of police and on the idea of police accountability.
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NEWS
By Jerelyn Eddings and Jerelyn Eddings,Johannesburg Bureau | June 27, 1992
PRETORIA, South Africa -- Startling testimony linked a secret South African police unit yesterday to the brutal massacre that has plunged the country into its latest crisis, further eroding the contention that there is no official involvement in township violence.A security guard at a coal mine where the police unit was housed secretly until this week said he was told that the unit went to Boipatong on the night of the June 17 massacre that left 40 people dead. He said armed men from the unit often leftthe mine facility at night in minivans and returned the following morning.
NEWS
By Jerelyn Eddings and Jerelyn Eddings,Johannesburg Bureau | July 5, 1992
BOIPATONG, South Africa -- As the sun goes down, the barricades go up in this dusty little township, revealing the battle zone that Boipatong has become.Tree trunks and stones are dragged to the entrance of virtually every dirt street, making it difficult for attackers to come by car or truck.The boys of the township, known locally as "comrades," become the watchmen for the community. They put down their schoolbooks and take up rocks as weapons for their all-night patrols."We don't have guns.
NEWS
By DAN BERGER | June 23, 1992
Whoever murdered Xhosa people in Boipatong township is in effective charge of South African negotiations.
NEWS
By Jerelyn Eddings and Jerelyn Eddings,Staff Writer | June 21, 1992
BOIPATONG, South Africa -- President F. W. de Klerk was run out of this angry black township yesterday by thousands of shouting residents who called him a murderer and blamed him for the massacre of their relatives and friends last week.Police later opened fire on the unarmed protesters, killing at least one man and injuring at least a dozen others.The scene compounded the horror of Boipatong, whose 15,000 residents are gripped with anger, confusion and grief over the slaughter of 40 people in their sleep Wednesday night.
NEWS
June 23, 1992
For South Africa, the temporary breakdown of constitutional talks is ominous. The slaughter which provoked it is more so. Black-white negotiations in the Convention for a Democratic South Africa (Codesa) were fated to stop and stutter and start again. But if a halt cannot be brought to the violence between Zulu and Xhosa, between African National Congress and Inkatha Freedom Party, it is grim news. If supporters of the ANC believe that the government through the police is fomenting the attacks carried out by Zulu people, then the potential alliance between ANC and the current white government, on which South Africa's hope for internal peace rests, cannot materialize.
NEWS
By Jerelyn Eddings and Jerelyn Eddings,Johannesburg Bureau | June 24, 1992
JOHANNESBURG, South Africa -- The march toward democracy in South Africa came to a dead halt yesterday as the African National Congress and its allies formally pulled out of negotiations with the government.Leaders of the ANC said they had no option but to break off all negotiations because "the National Party regime of President F. W. de Klerk has brought our country to the brink of disaster."The decision affirms a move Sunday by ANC President Nelson Mandela to break off meetings between the white-minority government and the dominant black political organization.
NEWS
By Jerelyn Eddings and Jerelyn Eddings,Johannesburg Bureau | August 18, 1992
JOHANNESBURG, South Africa -- Something is happening in South Africa that has rarely happened before: The police are being forced to answer charges that they slaughtered innocent blacks.In an extraordinary public forum, a half-dozen black witnesses have come forward this month to charge that police were present and in some cases played an active role in one of the most horrible massacres here in recent times.The investigation of the Boipatong massacre of June 17, when more than 40 people were slain in their homes, has had a profound impact on the image of police and on the idea of police accountability.
NEWS
By Jerelyn Eddings and Jerelyn Eddings,Johannesburg Bureau | June 22, 1992
JOHANNESBURG, South Africa -- Nelson Mandela broke off political negotiations with the white-minority government of President F. W. de Klerk yesterday, saying that the talks could not go on while the government was "murdering our people."Mr. Mandela announced his decision to suspend the talks after visiting the black township of Boipatong, where 40 people were slaughtered by unknown attackers last week and police opened fire on angry residents Saturday."I can no longer explain to our people why we continue to talk to a government which is murdering people," Mr. Mandela, president of the African National Congress, said at a news conference outside Boipatong in the township of Evaton.
NEWS
By JOHN BATTERSBY | June 28, 1992
Has South Africa's transition to democracy run out of steam? Since President Frederik de Klerk legalized opposition parties more than two years ago, political liberalization has been accompanied by escalating violence and continued deprivation for black South Africans. The quest for democracy at the national level has been accompanied by an alarming deterioration of prospects for democracy in the black townships.Hopes for setting up an interim government before the end of the year -- and democratic elections next year -- are fast receding.
NEWS
By Jerelyn Eddings and Jerelyn Eddings,Johannesburg Bureau | June 27, 1992
PRETORIA, South Africa -- Startling testimony linked a secret South African police unit yesterday to the brutal massacre that has plunged the country into its latest crisis, further eroding the contention that there is no official involvement in township violence.A security guard at a coal mine where the police unit was housed secretly until this week said he was told that the unit went to Boipatong on the night of the June 17 massacre that left 40 people dead. He said armed men from the unit often leftthe mine facility at night in minivans and returned the following morning.
NEWS
By Jerelyn Eddings and Jerelyn Eddings,Johannesburg Bureau | June 24, 1992
JOHANNESBURG, South Africa -- The march toward democracy in South Africa came to a dead halt yesterday as the African National Congress and its allies formally pulled out of negotiations with the government.Leaders of the ANC said they had no option but to break off all negotiations because "the National Party regime of President F. W. de Klerk has brought our country to the brink of disaster."The decision affirms a move Sunday by ANC President Nelson Mandela to break off meetings between the white-minority government and the dominant black political organization.
NEWS
By DAN BERGER | June 23, 1992
Whoever murdered Xhosa people in Boipatong township is in effective charge of South African negotiations.
NEWS
June 23, 1992
For South Africa, the temporary breakdown of constitutional talks is ominous. The slaughter which provoked it is more so. Black-white negotiations in the Convention for a Democratic South Africa (Codesa) were fated to stop and stutter and start again. But if a halt cannot be brought to the violence between Zulu and Xhosa, between African National Congress and Inkatha Freedom Party, it is grim news. If supporters of the ANC believe that the government through the police is fomenting the attacks carried out by Zulu people, then the potential alliance between ANC and the current white government, on which South Africa's hope for internal peace rests, cannot materialize.
NEWS
By Jerelyn Eddings and Jerelyn Eddings,Johannesburg Bureau | June 22, 1992
JOHANNESBURG, South Africa -- Nelson Mandela broke off political negotiations with the white-minority government of President F. W. de Klerk yesterday, saying that the talks could not go on while the government was "murdering our people."Mr. Mandela announced his decision to suspend the talks after visiting the black township of Boipatong, where 40 people were slaughtered by unknown attackers last week and police opened fire on angry residents Saturday."I can no longer explain to our people why we continue to talk to a government which is murdering people," Mr. Mandela, president of the African National Congress, said at a news conference outside Boipatong in the township of Evaton.
NEWS
By JOHN BATTERSBY | June 28, 1992
Has South Africa's transition to democracy run out of steam? Since President Frederik de Klerk legalized opposition parties more than two years ago, political liberalization has been accompanied by escalating violence and continued deprivation for black South Africans. The quest for democracy at the national level has been accompanied by an alarming deterioration of prospects for democracy in the black townships.Hopes for setting up an interim government before the end of the year -- and democratic elections next year -- are fast receding.
NEWS
By Jerelyn Eddings and Jerelyn Eddings,Johannesburg Bureau | July 7, 1992
JOHANNESBURG, South Africa -- A highly regarded judicial commission said yesterday that no evidence had been produced to support allegations linking deadly township violence to President F. W. De Klerk and officials of his state security forces.The chairman of the Goldstone Commission of Inquiry into Public Violence did criticize the government for failing to adopt any of its recommendations to quell the violence in which thousands of blacks have died.But Richard Goldstone, a respected judge who heads the commission on violence, delivered a severe blow to black activists who claim that the white government is to blame for the deaths.
NEWS
By Jerelyn Eddings and Jerelyn Eddings,Staff Writer | June 21, 1992
BOIPATONG, South Africa -- President F. W. de Klerk was run out of this angry black township yesterday by thousands of shouting residents who called him a murderer and blamed him for the massacre of their relatives and friends last week.Police later opened fire on the unarmed protesters, killing at least one man and injuring at least a dozen others.The scene compounded the horror of Boipatong, whose 15,000 residents are gripped with anger, confusion and grief over the slaughter of 40 people in their sleep Wednesday night.
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