Advertisement
HomeCollectionsBoiler
IN THE NEWS

Boiler

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By Andrea Siegel and Andrea Siegel,Sun Staff Writer | September 20, 1994
Members of the Seven Oaks community say they strongly object to the National Security Agency's plan to use a back-up boiler to heat a manufacturing and storage building.The oil-burning boiler has been in a metal building next to NSA's processing laboratory at Fort Meade near Route 32 since 1991. It has been used intermittently during planned outages, NSA officials said. But they want to keep it hot all the time, and that requires a permit from the Maryland Department of the Environment.The plan has riled much of the community.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
AEGIS STAFF REPORT | March 14, 2014
Church Creek Elementary School was evacuated briefly Friday morning while firefighters investigated a possible gas leak. Around 8 a.m., the school's chief custodian reported an odor of gas in the boiler room at the school at 4299 Church Creek Road, according to Lindsay Bilodeau, communications specialsit for Harford County Public Schools. Per the school system's normal procedures, the building was immediately evacuated and the fire department, BGE and school system facilities crews were notified to respond to the school, Bilodeau wrote in an email.  It was determined that a pilot light was out in one of the boilers.
Advertisement
NEWS
By Joe Nawrozki and Joe Nawrozki,SUN STAFF | January 11, 1996
Nineteen families at Riverdale Village Apartments in Middle River -- a rundown complex targeted for a Baltimore County takeover -- are being relocated after a boiler malfunctioned Sunday during the snowstorm and cut off heat.The families have been given space heaters until they are moved and will be transferred to vacant apartments free, a management spokeswoman said yesterday. She would not say when the move will be complete."I'm tired of this place, the way things get run down and never get repaired properly," Angela Sherburne, a mother of four, said.
HEALTH
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | February 28, 2013
Health officials continue to investigate how contaminated hot water sickened nearly two dozen people at the Johns Hopkins at Keswick complex Monday, but the case is similar to previous ones involving faulty water-heating systems that let chemicals mix into drinking water. Twenty-three people at the Hopkins facility - home to about 600 health system and university administrative workers - fell ill with headaches, breathing difficulty and dizziness. The investigation confirmed that chemicals known as nitrates and nitrites in the water supply were responsible for the illnesses, but officials still are exploring their origin.
NEWS
By FROM STAFF REPORTS | June 25, 1997
ANNAPOLIS -- Concerned by a boiler system accident that severely burned a Baltimore school child last year, state legislators called yesterday for a hearing to determine how regulators plan to strengthen oversight of the roughly 160 private boiler inspectors in Maryland.The decision follows a report in March by legislative auditors, who identified significant deficiencies in the way Maryland safeguards boiler and hot-water systems in public buildings. The auditors concluded that the Maryland Department of Labor, Licensing and Regulation rarely checks the work of private inspectors and inadequately monitors their qualifications.
NEWS
By John Rivera Sun reporter Kerry O'Rourke contributed to this article | October 20, 1991
Dundalk residents awoke yesterday morning to a fine mess: (( oily black soot covering their cars, yards and houses. They spent much of the day trying to wash it off.The mysterious soot probably came from a malfunctioning industrial boiler, state environmental officials said, but that had not determined the location of such a source."
NEWS
By Marcia Myers and Jean Thompson and Marcia Myers and Jean Thompson,SUN STAFF | February 14, 1997
An inquiry into boiler safety violations in Baltimore schools widened yesterday, with state regulators saying they will question school officials as well as inspectors and executives of the company responsible for inspecting the equipment.The regulators were responding to a new report that sharply contrasts the conditions described by Hartford (Conn.) Steam Boiler Inspection and Insurance Co. employees with those documented by state inspectors.According to the report, Hartford Steam inspectors found 28 violations in 195 inspections, none serious enough to merit a "red tag" -- which prevents the school system from using the equipment until repairs are made.
NEWS
By Marcia Myers and Marcia Myers,SUN STAFF | June 20, 1997
A year after a boiler accident that severely burned a city elementary school pupil, a state regulatory panel yesterday took the first steps to improve oversight of heating and hot water systems in public buildings.A task force of people who inspect, repair and maintain such systems will be created this summer to review the issue.In addition, Commissioner John P. O'Connor of the state Department of Labor, Licensing and Regulation said he will suggest increasing his inspection staff by about 50 percent in a report to the governor Monday.
NEWS
By Marcia Myers and Marcia Myers,SUN STAFF | March 20, 1997
Prompted by a water heater accident that severely burned a 7-year-old girl at a Baltimore elementary school in June, state auditors have identified significant deficiencies in the way Maryland safeguards boiler and hot-water systems in public buildings.Statewide, 70 percent of such systems are inspected by private, state-licensed contractors who are employed by insurance companies, but Maryland rarely checks on the quality of their work, the auditors concluded.In addition, the Maryland Department of Labor, Licensing and Regulation does not adequately monitor the qualifications of private inspectors, the auditors concluded.
NEWS
By Marcia Myers and Jean Thompson and Marcia Myers and Jean Thompson,SUN STAFF Sun staff writer John Rivera contributed to this article | September 17, 1996
Baltimore City Council President Lawrence A. Bell III yesterday called for a complete inspection of boiler systems throughout the city schools, after reports of widespread safety violations and fears of another accident like one that severely burned a first-grader in June."
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | February 8, 2013
Students and staff were evacuated from Westside Elementary School in Baltimore's Penn North neighborhood early Friday morning after carbon monoxide levels rose to a level higher than is considered safe in the school's boiler room, a Baltimore City Public Schools spokeswoman said. Everyone exited the building in the 2200 block of N. Fulton Ave., south of Druid Hill Park in West Baltimore, sometime after the morning bell rang so work crews could assess where the gas was coming from, said Edie House Foster, the spokeswoman.
NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | January 2, 2013
A boiler room explosion at Bates Middle School in Annapolis on Wednesday morning injured two maintenance workers and prompted Anne Arundel County School officials to evacuate the building. Anne Arundel County Schools spokesman Bob Mosier said that the school's boiler was down and a maintenance crew was working on it shortly before 9 a.m., when a small explosion occurred in the boiler room. Mosier said there was no fire but significant smoke from the explosion. The maintenance workers were transported to a nearby hospital with minor injuries.
FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler | January 5, 2010
A biofuel startup with a Baltimore production plant is planning to expand and hire this year, as orders for its cleaner-burning fuel grow, according to the firm's chief executive officer. New Generation Biofuels, which processes vegetable and soybean oil into fuel for heating buildings, generating electricity and running ships, intends to triple production capacity at its southern Baltimore facility from 5 million gallons per year to 15 million gallons annually, said CEO Cary Claiborne.
NEWS
January 28, 2008
Baltimore : Presidential visit Bush to come to city tomorrow President Bush plans a visit tomorrow to a faith-based program aimed at stabilizing the lives of former inmates in Baltimore and helping them return to their communities. Jean Cushman, executive director of Episcopal Community Services of Maryland, which runs the Jericho program, said she is pleased that it was chosen to be highlighted. "It's an acknowledgment of the excellent work that we've done," she said. Four years ago, during the State of the Union address, Bush announced the Prisoner Re-entry Initiative, which awards grants to groups that offer ex-offenders transitional services.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,Sun reporter | November 29, 2007
Carl M. Pickett, a Pearl Harbor survivor who later became vice president of Hartford Steam Boiler Inspection and Insurance Co., died Monday of pneumonia at Anne Arundel Medical Center. The Annapolis resident was 87. On Dec. 7, 1941, Mr. Pickett was aboard the destroyer USS Ralph S. Talbot moored at Pearl Harbor, Hawaii. "When the attack started, I opened the hatch and saw a [Japanese] Zero coming right toward me," Mr. Pickett wrote in response to a Midwestern high school student who had asked him about his memories of the attack.
NEWS
By LYNN ANDERSON | June 3, 2006
A Bel Air man was sentenced yesterday to three years' supervised probation, ordered to complete 200 hours of community service and pay $10,000 in fines for his role in a bribery scheme in the Baltimore school system's maintenance department. David Joseph Clemons, 59, the owner of Polar Bear Heating and Air Conditioning Inc., pleaded guilty in Baltimore Circuit Court to bribing the former head of the school system's facilities and maintenance department, Rajiv Dixit, so that Dixit would award more contracts to Clemons' firm, according to a statement released yesterday by the state prosecutor's office.
NEWS
By Marcia Myers and Marcia Myers,SUN STAFF | March 19, 1998
In response to a 1996 boiler accident that severely burned a Baltimore elementary pupil and helped reveal widespread safety problems in the schools, state regulators yesterday endorsed legislation that would tighten safety requirements and step up state oversight."
NEWS
By Kate Shatzkin and Marcia Myers and Kate Shatzkin and Marcia Myers,SUN STAFF | September 25, 1996
Baltimore school officials yesterday produced a hot water heater that mysteriously disappeared after an accident that severely burned a first-grader in June, admitting they have known its whereabouts for at least two weeks without alerting the state investigators who sought it.State regulators examined the heater at a Baltimore City schools workshop yesterday after receiving a tip that it was there. They say the equipment vanished from Hazelwood Elementary-Middle School in August after being labeled as evidence in an investigation of the burning of 7-year-old Ashley Moore.
NEWS
By Laura Loh and Laura Loh,SUN STAFF | May 20, 2005
The owner of a boiler company that has done business with the city for more than three decades pleaded guilty yesterday to defrauding city schools and the public works department of nearly $3.5 million. A plea bargain was entered in Baltimore Circuit Court that prosecutors say will repair some of the injury indirectly done to city students. Gilbert Sapperstein agreed to repay the stolen funds within 90 days and make a $250,000 donation to CollegeBound, a nonprofit organization that helps disadvantaged Baltimore students gain access to higher education.
NEWS
By Ryan Davis and Michael Hoffman and Ryan Davis and Michael Hoffman,SUN STAFF | March 19, 2005
The owner-operator of a boiler company has been accused of defrauding the city public schools of more than $3 million and the city public works department of more than $130,000, the state prosecutor announced yesterday. Gilbert Sapperstein, 72, of Green Spring Valley was charged with two counts each of felony theft, conspiracy to commit theft, bribery and conspiracy to commit bribery, said State Prosecutor Robert A. Rohrbaugh. If convicted, Sapperstein could be sentenced to more than 100 years in prison and fined thousands of dollars, as well as have to pay millions in restitution.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.