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NEWS
By Mike Farabaugh and Mike Farabaugh,Sun Staff Writer | March 13, 1994
A Harford County insurance executive who pleaded guilty to keeping the premiums after writing more than 700 bogus policies was sentenced to eight years in jail with all but two years suspended in Harford Circuit Court last week.Robert A. Lassen, 49, of the 3000 block of Creswell Road in Aberdeen also must serve five years of supervised probation after completing his sentence. He also was ordered to pay restitution of $103,000.Judge William O. Carr made Lassen eligible for work release from the county Detention Center and ordered that he report April 1 to begin serving his sentence.
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HEALTH
By Jean Marbella, The Baltimore Sun | October 12, 2013
It was the most expensive campaign ever launched, but opponents were determined to defeat the president's health care reform plan. "Would socialized medicine lead to socialization of other phases of American life?" began one of the pitches used in a massive advertising and lobbying effort. "Lenin thought so. He declared: 'Socialized medicine is the keystone to the arch of the Socialized State.'" That may sound like it was ripped from today's headlines — or at least, the debut this week of Fox News' latest talking head, Dr. Ben Carson.
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NEWS
By Gilbert A. Lewthwaite and Gilbert A. Lewthwaite,London Bureau of The Sun | February 16, 1991
LONDON -- British Prime Minister John Major matched President Bush's "cruel hoax" reaction to Iraq's withdrawal initiative yesterday, calling the Baghdad move "something of a bogus sham."Mr. Major, who has committed the second-largest Western force to the Persian Gulf war, said, "The more we learn about what has been said, the more that seems to be the case."Defense Secretary Tom King said simply, "It has got to be unconditional withdrawal." He added, "You can't go into a country, grab it, seize it and then say you will argue about the terms on which you are prepared to go, and that has been the situation since August."
NEWS
Editorial from The Aegis | September 24, 2013
Like squirrels trying to get into a bird feeder, a share of people 20 and younger can be relied upon to take every opportunity available to countermand the law that precludes anyone younger than 21 from partaking of alcoholic beverages. Thus it comes as no surprise that yet again the matter of people using bogus identification cards as proof of age at licensed beverage retailers was before the Harford County Liquor Control Board last week. As liquor inspector Charles Robbins said last week: "It's a big problem.
NEWS
By Scott Higham and Scott Higham,Washington Bureau of The Sun | August 8, 1995
WASHINGTON -- It's a practice as old as politics -- casting ballots in the names of dead people. But in a new twist to tradition, dead people and other unsuspecting voters are apparently now lobbying politicians on Capitol Hill.Last week, representatives of the nation's biggest phone companies shipped thousands of telegrams to House members before they voted on a sweeping telecommunications bill. The trouble is, at least one of the senders is dead, and some are confined to nursing homes or hospitals.
NEWS
May 14, 1996
NOW AND THEN something happens that argues against the use of narcotics much more eloquently than any anti-drug propaganda. The bogus heroin that appeared in East Baltimore over the weekend, killing four and sending dozens of overdose cases to hospitals was such an instance. Better than verbal warnings it underscored that drug users are at the mercy of traffickers and dealers and have no idea what they are about to smoke or inject into their veins.The drug that was sold at street corners as "Homicide" turned out to be a concoction of an anti-motion medicine, cough suppressant and various cutting agents.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | September 6, 1996
"Bogus" isn't. But it tries to be.By casting a kid who's not so much an actor to be watched as a moppet to be hugged ... by getting Whoopi Goldberg to do essentially the same shtick she perfected in "Ghost" ... by suggesting a 7-year-old could safely walk the streets of Newark, N.J., at night ... by adopting a style that's some weird marriage of "Harvey" and Federico Fellini, complete with huge, unseen friends and circus-shrouded dreams ...It's all pretty fluffy and phony and forgettable.
NEWS
By SUN STAFF | October 13, 1998
A secretary in the Howard County Department of Public Works is accused of forging $20 bills with a computer scanner at work and then trying to pass the bogus greenbacks during the weekend at a Columbia store, Howard County police said.Charged with forgery and knowingly passing false bills is Jennifer Ann McCulley, 27, of the 4800 block of Montgomery Road in Ellicott City.McCulley was released on $5,000 bail.About 12: 20 p.m. Saturday, a woman tried to buy $260 in merchandise at BJ Wholesale Club on Snowden River Parkway, police said.
BUSINESS
By Bill Atkinson and Bill Atkinson,SUN STAFF | May 27, 1999
Joseph Jett had everything. He was a rising star on Wall Street at Kidder Peabody & Co., had millions in the bank and drove fast cars.But over the past five years, Jett has concluded that you have nothing if you don't have your good name.Restoring it has become his life's mission."I have got to get my named cleared," Jett, 41, said in an interview yesterday before an appearance at the central Enoch Pratt Free Library to plug his new book, "Black and White on Wall Street."In April 1994, Jett, a 36-year old managing partner at Kidder, was fired after being accused of booking $350 million in bogus profits from bond trades, allegedly so that he could get millions of dollars in bonuses.
NEWS
By Kelly Gilbert and Kelly Gilbert,Evening Sun Staff | January 17, 1992
By the time a Secret Service agent dove into the cold water at Liberty Dam on Thanksgiving weekend, most of the suspects in a $1.2 million counterfeiting case had been arrested and charged.The diver found $90,000 in counterfeit $20 bills in a plastic bag weighted down with rocks in the deep water next to the dam, and retrieved another bag containing the printing plates used to make the bogus bills.That evidence, which corroborated the stories cooperators had told, was icing on the cake."There were high-fives all around," said Assistant U.S. Attorney Maury Epner.
NEWS
Dan Rodricks | July 1, 2013
You probably don't want to bother — because, let's face it, eating a salad with gritty spinach is more fun — but you really should take a close look at your cellphone bill. You could be getting "crammed" with bogus charges for sports trivia and horoscope texts you never ordered. I've told you this before, and my Baltimore Sun colleague Eileen Ambrose has warned you about it in her consumer reporting. If you haven't actually looked at your bill in a while — either online or in the printed version that comes in the mail — pour yourself a beverage, sit down and take a close look.
NEWS
February 28, 2013
I was surprised and pleased to see David Fahrenthold's article on the federal "cuts in spending" approved in 2011 ("'Smoke & mirrors,'" Feb. 24). I wished he would have pointed out the added smoke and mirrors that persists from this president. President Barack Obama repeatedly went in front of the television cameras touting the $2.5 trillion in cuts with the fiscal cliff agreement. Looking at that number in detail, the truth is that there wasn't a dime of cuts to the federal budget.
NEWS
By Scott Calvert, The Baltimore Sun | December 10, 2012
Speed camera companies and local governments would be penalized $1,000 for each "bogus" citation issued to motorists under proposed legislation announced Monday by state Del. Jon Cardin. The Baltimore County Democrat also wants to require governments in Maryland to submit regular speed camera audits to the General Assembly. And he wants to help ensure the accuracy of tickets by mandating precise time stamps on the two photos mailed to drivers as evidence of their speeding. His proposal comes after The Baltimore Sun found inaccuracies with five of the city's 83 automated speed cameras and showed that there's no way to verify the alleged speeds printed on tickets issued by Baltimore County, Howard County and the State Highway Administration.
BUSINESS
By Gus G. Sentementes, The Baltimore Sun | January 11, 2012
As the Ravens drove toward the playoffs, Barbra Skarzynski wanted to buy her son a team jersey as a Christmas gift. She searched Google for Lardarius Webb gear, quickly found a site that billed itself as an official store of the Ravens, and bought a jersey for $70. Weeks later, the Baltimore woman received the jersey in a box with Chinese characters on it, from Shanghai. She discovered that parts of it were blue instead of Ravens purple. And worst of all, the cornerback's name on the back of the jersey - which was not licensed by the National Football League - was spelled "EWBB.
NEWS
May 2, 2011
Kevin Seawright, the high-ranking school department official who resigned Thursday after The Sun questioned his academic credentials, may have been good at his job. But that doesn't change the fact that no one apparently bothered to check out his background before offering him the post. Either the Baltimore school system decided it didn't care that one of its top officials had degrees from unaccredited universities — in effect, no academic qualifications at all — or it didn't know.
NEWS
By Larry Carson, The Baltimore Sun | November 1, 2010
A person posing as a food inspector unsuccessfully tried to get a Howard County restaurant operator release sensitive information over the weekend, the latest instance in a series of similar incidents around the country in recent months, county health officials said. Saturday, the restaurant operator got a call from someone posing as a county health inspector who said the Health Department wanted to schedule an emergency food inspection at a specific date and time. The restaurateur was asked for detailed personal and business information, and when she questioned that, was given a telephone number to call to get a special code number and was then told to call back.
SPORTS
By Ray Frager | December 21, 2008
Titans@Steelers 1 p.m. [chs. 13, 9] This game presents quite a conundrum - for the officials. Both teams have benefited from rather, uh, curious calls this season in games against the Ravens. The Steelers got that mystery-plane replay reversal last week, and the Titans were awarded a fortuitous roughing-the-passer penalty on a play where Kerry Collins felt less pressure than you'll get at Christmas dinner from Mom about giving her grandkids. So, with no Ravens in the game, which team gets today's bogus call?
NEWS
By Debbie Cenziper and Debbie Cenziper,The Washington Post | October 18, 2009
WASHINGTON - - In a city ravaged by the highest rate of AIDS cases in the nation, the D.C. Health Department paid millions to nonprofit groups that delivered substandard services or failed to account for any work at all, even as sick people searched for care or died waiting. More than $1 million in AIDS money went to a housing group whose ailing boarders sometimes struggled without electricity, gas or food. A supervisor said she was ordered to create records for ghost employees. About $400,000 was paid to a nonprofit organization launched by a man who once ran one of the District's largest cocaine rings, for a promised job-training center that has never opened.
BUSINESS
By Kenneth R. Harney and Kenneth R. Harney,Washington Post Writers Group | September 13, 2009
The IRS has an urgent message for would-be home purchasers: Make the most of the $8,000 first-time buyer tax credit before it disappears Dec. 1 - if you qualify. But if you don't truly qualify, don't try to play games with the credit. The IRS already has 24 criminal investigations of suspected fraud under way around the country. It has executed seven search warrants and in July a tax preparer in Florida entered a guilty plea on federal charges of fraud in connection with the first-time buyer credit.
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