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By Don Markus and Don Markus,Sun Staff Writer | June 20, 1994
OAKMONT, Pa. -- Nobody won the 94th U.S. Open yesterday at Oakmont Country Club. Instead, Ernie Els of South Africa and American Loren Roberts lost chances to win down the stretch while Colin Montgomerie of Scotland benefited from their mistakes. In other words, they tied.Welcome to golf's version of the World Cup.Instead of crowning the 24-year-old Els as the game's next megastar, or talking about the long road back from oblivion for Roberts, the Open has its first three-way playoff since 1963.
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By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | August 13, 2014
Your Midweek Madness provider is on vacation for a couple of weeks, but understands your need for periodic relief from the dreariness of life, hence this Beethoven-ized blast of a well-known march tune played by the ever so clever Dudley Moore.
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SPORTS
By Dan Greenberg and Dan Greenberg,SUN STAFF | July 24, 2003
CHEVY CHASE - It took only one word for Greg Carlin to describe how he felt after he let a five-shot lead slip away before rebounding with a match-winning bogey on the 18th hole to send him into the second round of the 56th U.S. Junior Amateur Golf Championship yesterday at Columbia Country Club. "Awesome," said the relieved Kensington resident. "I almost gave it away. But I survived." Carlin's gutsy, 10-foot putt on 18 gave him a one-stroke victory over Fresno, Calif., native Charlie Harris in the opening round of the tournament.
NEWS
June 12, 2011
When, where: Thursday to Sunday, Congressional Country Club (Blue Course), Bethesda, Md. Course facts: 7,574 yards, par71. Field: 156 (141 pros, 13 amateurs), cut after 36 holes to top 60 and ties, plus anyone else within 10 strokes of the lead. Two slots remain open for players moving into the top 50 of the world rankings this week, or if the St. Jude Classic winner also won another PGA Tour event in the past 51 weeks. Playoff (if necessary)
SPORTS
By SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 11, 2001
Billy Wingerd, a recent Overlea High graduate, survived a final-hole bogey to win the seventh annual Spring Publinx Championship at Pine Ridge Golf Course yesterday. In winning his first major title, Wingerd finished with a par-72 for a 36-hole total of 1-under-par 142, followed by first-round leader Larry Cronise at 76-143. Tim Elliott and Phil Novak, making his appearance in a Publinx event in some 20 years, were tied for third (144 total). At the 18th tee, Wingerd, 18, had a two-stroke advantage over Cronise, 26, who had settled down after a rocky start.
SPORTS
By John W. Stewart and John W. Stewart,SUN STAFF | August 5, 1996
Henry Blue won the 42nd Baltimore City Amateur championship, but it did not come without a struggle -- certainly a tougher road than the two-time winner might have anticipated over his home course, Green Spring Valley Hunt Club.A double-bogey five at the last hole left him with a second-round 78, a two-day total of 4-over-par 148, and a one-shot edge on Serge Hogg, who finished 74-75149 in the 31-man field. Late bogeys proved costly to Rick Sovero and Adrian Druzgala, each of whom wound up at 150 for two trips over the 6,489-yard course.
SPORTS
By FROM STAFF REPORTS | October 4, 2000
Professional Larry Ringer of Enterprise Golf Club used a birdie in the first playoff hole to claim victory in the inaugural Maryland Senior Open Golf Championship at Wakefield Valley Golf Club. Ringer knocked a pitching wedge close to the pin and then converted the putt to defeat John McNaney. Both Ringer and McNaney were tied at the completion of 36 holes with a score of 3-over par 147. Ringer began the day with a double-bogey and two bogeys in his first three holes. However, birdies on 4, 6 and 7 brought him back into contention.
SPORTS
By SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 30, 2001
John Rudolph shot a 3-under-par 68 to take a two-stroke lead after the first round of the annual Maryland Amateur Stroke Play championship at Mount Pleasant Golf Course yesterday. Rudolph, who plays out of Geneva Farms in Street, dominated the 150-player field, as he had no 5s on his card (he birdied the two par 5s, No. 1 and No. 10), and closed with a birdie at the 18th to complete a bogey-free round that was as hot as the weather over the 6,726-yard course. Paul Steinhardt had all four of his birdies on the front nine in shooting 70, while Jim Winner turned in a 1-under 35, then had two birdies and two bogeys on the back nine to tie him at 70. Four players tied at 71, including Joe Records, who birdied the seventh, eighth and ninth holes, then gave them back for 71, and Tim Dilli, who hit a ball out of bounds at the 14th, then finished with four successive 3s (three of them birdies)
SPORTS
By Don Markus and Don Markus,SUN STAFF | June 16, 2002
FARMINGDALE, N.Y. -- It was all there for Phil Mickelson last night on the Black Course at Bethpage State Park. A chance to close out a spark- ling third round of the U.S. Open with two straight birdies. A chance to close the deficit on Tiger Woods to two shots. A chance to play with Woods in the final round today. "I would have liked to have been in the last group," said Mickelson, who will celebrate his 32nd birthday today. But none of that happened. A bogey on the par-4 18th hole after Mickelson drove into the left rough left him with a still impressive 3-under-par 67 but, after Woods closed with two birdies on his last four holes, it also left Mickelson five shots behind.
SPORTS
By Teddy Greenstein and Teddy Greenstein,Tribune Newspapers | April 12, 2009
AUGUSTA, Ga. -The "Paddy Slam" got buried on Augusta National's par-5 second hole Saturday. Padraig Harrington did the digging himself after taking a quadruple-bogey 9. After Harrington pulled his drive into the woods, he punished his ball with another shot that hit nothing but tree. "You live and learn," he said. By the time Harrington blasted out, his hopes for a third consecutive major title were all but gone. In one hole, Harrington went from 2-under-par to 2-over. He remained composed, though, shooting 3-under over the final 16 holes for a 1-over 73. He's at 1-under 215, 10 strokes behind co-leaders Angel Cabrera and Kenny Perry.
SPORTS
By Jeff Shain | June 9, 2011
In more audacious days, Tiger Woods famously defied his doctors. "I'm playing in the U.S. Open," Woods said three years ago, dismissing any suggestion that he give his tattered left knee a proper rest. "And I'm going to win. " And so he did, sprinkling enough fabulous shots through five agonizing days at Torrey Pines to take Rocco Mediate to a playoff and then prevail in 19 holes. It remains the most recent of his 14 major crowns — and arguably his most extraordinary. Compare that to Tuesday's words as Woods took himself out of next week's Open at Congressional.
NEWS
By Teddy Greenstein, Tribune newspapers | June 20, 2010
PEBBLE BEACH, Calif. — He began the day tied for 25th, sharing a Siberia-like position with the likes of Fred Funk, Scott Verplank and a Korean teenager named S.Y. Noh. Tiger Woods, a U.S. Open also-ran. Only he didn't know it. "I'm right there," he promised Friday. And the public rolled its collective eyes. Well, after Woods made eight birdies — a U.S. Open career high — to charge from 6 over par to 1 under, he's better than there. Or at least in a better position to win his fourth U.S. Open than anyone could have imagined.
NEWS
By Bill Dwyre, Tribune newspapers | June 19, 2010
PEBBLE BEACH, Calif. — They call the stretch of holes from Nos. 8 through 10 at Pebble Beach the Cliffs of Doom. Golfers call it names not nearly that nice. Take Dr. Gil Morgan. He led the 1992 U.S. Open at Pebble by seven shots on Saturday and had reached an Open-record 12 under par through seven holes. He was hitting everything perfectly. Life was good. The Cliffs beckoned, and Morgan smiled. Then he went double bogey, bogey, double bogey, disintegrated to 4 under by the end of his round and shot 81 on Sunday.
NEWS
By Teddy Greenstein, Tribune reporter | June 18, 2010
PEBBLE BEACH, Calif. — Three winners emerged from the first round of the U.S. Open, and you won't find any listed among the 156-player field. Winner No. 1: USGA setup man Mike Davis. No one broke 69, but still no one ripped Davis. Hammering the USGA for creating obscene playing conditions used to be a hobby for many pros. "It was very playable," Phil Mickelson said of the 7,040-yard layout. "Mike Davis is the greatest asset the USGA has, in my opinion." And Mickelson felt this way after shooting a 4-over 75 devoid of a single birdie.
SPORTS
By Kevin Van Valkenburg and Kevin Van Valkenburg,kevin.vanvalkenburg@baltsun.com | October 3, 2009
When you grow up in Oklahoma, where dodging tornadoes is considered to be a character-building aspect of everyday life, you learn to pay close attention to the weather. And so from a young age, Bob Tway found himself obsessed with all things meteorological. This became doubly important when juxtaposed with Tway's other childhood obsession - the game of golf. Understanding which way the wind might blow, or how the humidity and the temperature might affect the flight of the ball, was crucial to his livelihood.
SPORTS
By Teddy Greenstein and Teddy Greenstein,Tribune Newspapers | April 12, 2009
AUGUSTA, Ga. -The "Paddy Slam" got buried on Augusta National's par-5 second hole Saturday. Padraig Harrington did the digging himself after taking a quadruple-bogey 9. After Harrington pulled his drive into the woods, he punished his ball with another shot that hit nothing but tree. "You live and learn," he said. By the time Harrington blasted out, his hopes for a third consecutive major title were all but gone. In one hole, Harrington went from 2-under-par to 2-over. He remained composed, though, shooting 3-under over the final 16 holes for a 1-over 73. He's at 1-under 215, 10 strokes behind co-leaders Angel Cabrera and Kenny Perry.
SPORTS
By Thomas Bonk and Thomas Bonk,LOS ANGELES TIMES | July 19, 2004
TROON, Scotland - When exactly did the British Open decide to turn into a coming-out party? Last year, it was Ben Curtis, ranked 396th, who was king for a day at Royal St. George's, and yesterday in the cool gray early evening, it was Todd Hamilton's turn at Royal Troon. Truly. Hamilton, 38, is a PGA Tour rookie and the survivor of eight trips to the PGA Tour qualifying school. He has also survived a dozen years of playing on the Japan Tour. Now, the pride of McKinney, Texas, by way of such stops along the golf trail as Osaka and Calcutta, is the newest champion of the British Open.
SPORTS
By Don Markus and Don Markus,SUN STAFF | April 14, 2003
AUGUSTA, Ga. - History was made yesterday at Augusta National, just not the kind the sport's keepers usually get too excited about. Mike Weir did what Tiger Woods couldn't do in the final round of the 67th Masters, what left-handers have been trying to do here forever, and in major championships for 40 years. Weir won. After playing without a bogey for all 18 holes of regulation, Weir made one on the first hole of sudden-death, the par-4 10th. But Len Mattiace, who stumbled into the playoff with a bogey to close an otherwise sparkling round of 7-under-par 65, made a double-bogey to give the 32-year-old Weir the first major championship of his career.
SPORTS
January 4, 2008
KAPALUA, Hawaii -- Opening day for the PGA Tour was filled with oddities, starting with Nick Watney leading the Mercedes-Benz Championship yesterday with a 5-under-par 68 that featured no bogeys. Newcomers are supposed to be at a disadvantage on the Plantation Course at Kapalua with its mammoth greens and severe grain, but Watney kept it simple and sank enough putts to take a one-shot lead over Daniel Chopra and get his 2008 season off to a good start. Brandt Snedeker was in the lead most of the round until he hit what he must have thought was the perfect tee shot on No. 17. But the ball ended up in waist-high grass, some 100 yards behind Steve Stricker.
SPORTS
By RICK MAESE | July 6, 2007
BETHESDA-- --Tiger Woods wasn't entertaining hypothetical scenarios, but that doesn't mean that you can't. What do you suppose would happen if your pregnant wife were hospitalized and, rather than joining her, you chose to instead play golf? Chances are, she'd call your mother to complain, scream at least six of George Carlin's seven dirty words, throw every hand-held appliance toward the vicinity of your head, and then, if you're still breathing, move most of your belongings to the curb.
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