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Bog Turtle

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NEWS
By Douglas Birch and Douglas Birch,Staff Writer | May 28, 1992
CARDIFF -- Mosquitoes whine past Scott Smith's ears, and the noontime sun tickles sweat from his brow. Mud slurps at his rubber waders as he plugs along, ankle-deep, between the tussock sedge, skunk cabbage and jewelweeds. He freezes in this hidden bog, ringed by oak and black cherry trees, in a glade between grain fields in northern Harford County.He squints. He grabs."I've got one!" he calls out, brandishing a wiggling creature a little bigger and bulkier than a cassette tape. It hisses faintly in protest and frustration, sounding like a leak in a bicycle tire.
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NEWS
December 27, 2013
Forty years ago this month, Congress passed the Endangered Species Act; astute, visionary legislation that's served as our nation's lifeline for plants, fish, and wildlife on the brink of extinction. The act has since become one of the strongest and most important laws we have for protecting and restoring the native species of our continent. Thanks to Endangered Species Act, Americans can delight in the sight of bald eagle soaring over the rivers of the Chesapeake Bay, hear the howls of wolves in Yellowstone National Park and witness the magnificent breeching of a humpback whale off the coast of California.
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NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,SUN STAFF | May 11, 2001
A new study states that the habitat of the endangered bog turtle would not be damaged by construction of a badly needed Route 30 bypass around Hampstead, offering commuters hope for an end to long waits at the Carroll County town's stoplights, and perhaps allaying concerns about the survival of a creature few people had heard of three years ago. "Construction of the Hampstead Bypass will ... have a negligible impact on the bog turtle wetlands," said...
FEATURES
Tim Wheeler | March 8, 2012
Maryland's threatened little bog turtles may be getting some extra help from the state's farmers, under a new federal conservation initiative. Obama adminstration officials are slated to unveil today (3/8) a $33 million bid to make more farmers and other landowners partners - instead of potential adversaries - in efforts to save seven rare and endangered critters, including North America's smallest turtle, which in Maryland is found here and there in marshy spots in Carroll, Baltimore, Harford and Cecil counties.
NEWS
By MARINA SARRIS and MARINA SARRIS,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 23, 2006
Conservationist David Lee grumbles that Marylanders know more about polar bears than about a threatened animal in their own backyard: the bog turtle. The tiny reptile might be the most well-known of the 39 rare, threatened or endangered species in Carroll County. Several of those species haven't been spotted in years, but bog turtles have been quietly living in marshy areas, their locations kept secret to deter poachers. Bog turtle enthusiasts hope to spark interest in protecting the areas where turtles live in Maryland and elsewhere, said Lee, executive director of The Tortoise Reserve, a nonprofit conservation organization in North Carolina.
NEWS
By Douglas Birch and Douglas Birch,Staff Writer | May 28, 1992
CARDIFF -- Mosquitoes whine past Scott Smith's ears, and the noontime sun tickles sweat from his brow. Mud slurps at his rubber waders as he plugs along, ankle-deep, between the tussock sedge, skunk cabbage and jewelweeds. He freezes in this hidden bog, ringed by oak and black cherry trees, in a glade between grain fields in northern Harford County.He squints. He grabs."I've got one!" he calls out, brandishing a wiggling creature a little bigger and bulkier than a cassette tape. It hisses faintly in protest and frustration, sounding like a leak in a bicycle tire.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,michael.dresser@baltsun.com | May 27, 2009
A herd of goats coming to the rescue of a handful of imperiled turtles may sound like the plot of a Saturday morning children's cartoon show, but that's just what's happening in the Carroll County town of Hampstead. The State Highway Administration has enlisted the help of about 40 goats to devour invasive plant species in wetlands along the path of the soon-to-open, 4.4-mile Hampstead Bypass to protect the habitat of the bog turtle - a species listed as threatened in Maryland. State highway officials decided to give the goats a tryout as four-legged lawn mowers rather than to attack the unwanted vegetation with mechanical mowers that might have killed the diminutive reptiles or damaged their boggy habitat on the fringe of Hampstead.
NEWS
May 17, 2001
THE TINY, RECLUSIVE and rare bog turtle has taken a lot of abuse from mankind. The spring-fed swamps and rivulets that are its natural home were drained for development. The palm-sized reptile was widely hunted for the pet trade, until it was declared a threatened species. That spawned a lucrative, illegal trade in the creature. But nowhere has the turtle gained the attention that it has in Carroll County, where its unwelcome bogs lie in the path of a long-planned Route 30 bypass for the town of Hampstead.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,SUN STAFF | March 15, 2004
After delaying for several years a town's effort to build a bypass, the tiny bog turtle might soon help move the project forward. In fact, town officials insist, the fate of the $40 million Hampstead Bypass and the survival of the one-pound reptiles are intertwined. "We want the turtle preserved and the road built," said Hampstead Town Manager Ken Decker. "The only way to save the turtle is to build the road because the road opens the door to preserving the habitat that is key to preserving the turtle."
NEWS
By Kerry O'Rourke and Kerry O'Rourke,Sun Staff Writer | November 1, 1994
A rare turtle discovered near Hampstead may delay work on the Route 30 bypass.A bog turtle seen in a wetland area at the north end of the proposed bypass route recently was listed as a "threatened" species in Maryland.The state may be forced to design a new route for the $35 million highway, which has been planned since the 1960s, to avoid the (( turtle's habitat.Maryland Department of Transportation officials broke the news to Carroll County officials yesterday at their annual meeting at the County Office Building in Westminster.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,michael.dresser@baltsun.com | May 27, 2009
A herd of goats coming to the rescue of a handful of imperiled turtles may sound like the plot of a Saturday morning children's cartoon show, but that's just what's happening in the Carroll County town of Hampstead. The State Highway Administration has enlisted the help of about 40 goats to devour invasive plant species in wetlands along the path of the soon-to-open, 4.4-mile Hampstead Bypass to protect the habitat of the bog turtle - a species listed as threatened in Maryland. State highway officials decided to give the goats a tryout as four-legged lawn mowers rather than to attack the unwanted vegetation with mechanical mowers that might have killed the diminutive reptiles or damaged their boggy habitat on the fringe of Hampstead.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,mary.gail.hare@baltsun.com | January 13, 2009
The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission said yesterday that it plans to vote this week on a proposal to build a natural gas terminal in Sparrows Point and an 88-mile pipeline to Pennsylvania, despite a request to delay action until concerns about an endangered bat and a threatened turtle can be addressed. "The case is still scheduled for consideration Thursday," said Tamara Young Allen, a commission spokeswoman. "The commission could address the issues brought by the wildlife service and could approve [the project]
NEWS
By MARINA SARRIS and MARINA SARRIS,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 23, 2006
Conservationist David Lee grumbles that Marylanders know more about polar bears than about a threatened animal in their own backyard: the bog turtle. The tiny reptile might be the most well-known of the 39 rare, threatened or endangered species in Carroll County. Several of those species haven't been spotted in years, but bog turtles have been quietly living in marshy areas, their locations kept secret to deter poachers. Bog turtle enthusiasts hope to spark interest in protecting the areas where turtles live in Maryland and elsewhere, said Lee, executive director of The Tortoise Reserve, a nonprofit conservation organization in North Carolina.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,SUN STAFF | May 1, 2004
It took almost seven years of study - in which scientists analyzed the DNA and followed the migratory patterns of bog turtles with radio monitors - but the federal government has concluded that the tiny reptile and the highway can live together, after all. Work on the $48 million Hampstead Bypass, the No. 1 transportation priority in one of the region's fastest-growing counties, was delayed in 1998 when two of the rare turtles were discovered crawling in...
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,SUN STAFF | March 15, 2004
After delaying for several years a town's effort to build a bypass, the tiny bog turtle might soon help move the project forward. In fact, town officials insist, the fate of the $40 million Hampstead Bypass and the survival of the 1-pound reptiles are intertwined. "We want the turtle preserved and the road built," said Town Manager Ken Decker. "The only way to save the turtle is to build the road because the road opens the door to preserving the habitat that is key to preserving the turtle."
NEWS
By Pat Brodowski and Pat Brodowski,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 15, 2002
JESSICA HUBER LOVES animals, even those she hasn't seen. The elusive bog turtle, an endangered native of Hampstead, is one animal she cares about even if she hasn't been face to face with one. Her essay on saving the bog turtle caught the eye of judges who selected her to be one of more than 50 girls and boys to attend the Mutual of Omaha's Wild Kingdom Kid's Summit on Conservation. Jessica, 12, and her parents, Kate and Bob, returned to Manchester on Thursday after their free, three-day whirlwind wild animal tour led by television animal show hosts in Los Angeles.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,SUN STAFF | May 1, 2004
It took almost seven years of study - in which scientists analyzed the DNA and followed the migratory patterns of bog turtles with radio monitors - but the federal government has concluded that the tiny reptile and the highway can live together, after all. Work on the $48 million Hampstead Bypass, the No. 1 transportation priority in one of the region's fastest-growing counties, was delayed in 1998 when two of the rare turtles were discovered crawling in...
NEWS
By Childs Walker and Childs Walker,SUN STAFF | February 17, 2002
In a tale of turtles, zoning designations and millions of dollars, officials at Carroll County General Hospital have a potential conflict with the town of Hampstead over a 267-acre parcel within town limits. Lawyers for the hospital, which owns the property, say it could be worth between $2 million and $3 million if developed. The land, however, includes a 72-acre patch inhabited by endangered bog turtles. Developing an industrial site around the turtles would be difficult, and given this and other problems, the town wants to change the parcel's zoning designation from industrial to environmentally protected.
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