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NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,SUN STAFF | October 4, 2004
Keith Underwood lightly taps a spindly stem in a ravine near the Magothy River, relieved to find Maryland's last remaining box huckleberry plant is still hanging in there. The Crownsville restoration ecologist is a driving force behind saving and propagating the Ice-Age cultivar, as well as other plants, and creating the environments that could be used to re-establish them. Admittedly passionate about his environmental views and impatient with bureaucracy, he is always ready to start a conservation project, where he blends his beliefs in rebuilding dwindling environments and purifying water bound for the Chesapeake Bay with work, mixing paid and volunteer roles.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Janell Sutherland | May 6, 2013
Back in February, before we knew about crippling fears of water and low likeability factors and One Mullet to Rule Them All, 11 teams began a race around the world. Stuff happened with cheese and haggis. Alliances formed, craziness surfaced, teeth detached. And now it's time (cue Phil's eyebrow) for the finale of "The Amazing Race" (cue music). The top four teams leave Scotland and all take the same ferry to Belfast, Northern Ireland. While driving themselves to a park, Max and Katie's instincts tell them to turn around.
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NEWS
By Heather Dewar and Heather Dewar,SUN STAFF | April 7, 2001
RISING SUN - New-hatched and hungry, the young brown trout should be swimming into the sunlight now. In all the coldest, clearest freshwater streams of the mid-Atlantic coast, the twig-thin creatures have wriggled out of their gravelly beds during the past two weeks, looking for a good meal. But yesterday there were no signs of young trout in the unnamed tributary of Basin Run that was considered one of the state's most productive trout streams - until December, when construction errors caused an earthen dam to burst at a nearby Superfund site, clogging the stream with a torrent of muck.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Dave Gilmore | May 15, 2012
Fans across the country lined up at video game retailers late last night to purchase copies of “Diablo III” for the PC and “Max Payne 3” for consoles in what has been a whirlwind 24 hours for gaming. With a combined 21-year absence since the “II/2” versions of “Diablo” and “Max Payne,” fans were eager to get a jump on the highly anticipated sequels. “Diablo III” players arrived home after installing their games to a variety of issues due to the game's overwhelming popularity.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,sun reporter | August 29, 2007
Between the muck and the poison ivy, interest was scant in the Olde Severna Park community in exploring the soggy area along Sullivan Cove that was hidden by dense bramble. But treks in recent weeks have revealed the site is a bog - an unusual type of wetland characterized by wobbling mats of peat floating on cold, clear water. The water level barely changes despite the season. Maryland environmental officials are recommending adding the discovery to a regulated list of Wetlands of Special State Concern, giving it additional protections, said Kim Lamphier, a spokeswoman for the Maryland Department of the Environment.
NEWS
By Jackie Powder and Jackie Powder,SUN STAFF | July 16, 2002
In its effort to protect a collection of ecologically rare and fragile bogs on Pasadena's Mountain Road peninsula, the Magothy River Land Trust has acquired 6 acres in the Boulevard Park area of Pasadena, trust officials said. The property, made up of many small lots along Maryland Avenue and Severn Road, is particularly significant because it includes part of a bog - one of 10 that are clustered on the north shore of the Magothy River, said Sally Hornor, executive administrator of the land trust.
NEWS
By Laura Sullivan and Laura Sullivan,SUN STAFF | November 30, 1997
A group of Pasadena residents says they are determined to stop a development they fear will damage a nearby bog and add even more traffic to notoriously congested Mountain Road.But despite their opposition, the project is moving ahead.The 22 acres between Hickory Point and Long Point roads already has the zoning that Cattail Associates needs to build 18 houses. And the Severna Park developer began the process of surveying, financing and collecting permits years ago. The firm waited out the moratorium that banned development on the peninsula and several months ago turned its plans over to the county's Office of Planning and Code Enforcement, which so far has found little wrong beyond a few details.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,SUN STAFF | October 17, 2000
Many homeowners take comfort in knowing water is wicking away from their home after a rain. But Judy and Robert Cole have gone to some effort to keep the rainwater next to their Pasadena home, where it pours into a depression, an acidic garden of Ice Age-relic plants. In a sunny spot on a wooded 5-acre lot, odd insect-eating plants dine on whatever flies in, sphagnum floats to the top of a clear, homemade pond to catch the sun and sinks at night, and a floating blob of peat is home to what looks like a mutant spider but is really a delicate sundew.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and Timothy B. Wheeler,SUN STAFF | March 31, 1997
LA PLATA -- As wetlands go, Piney Branch Bog is a gem.The soggy, heathlike landscape hugging the creek as it meanders through Charles County harbors nine kinds of plants rarely seen in Maryland, including the carnivorous purple pitcher plant."
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,SUN STAFF | March 1, 1997
It is the kind of mire nobody wants to fall into: percolating, mucky, pools of water spattered with clumps of moss, slime filling the gaps among rotting leaves, and an occasional haze above the water that hides the bugs.The young Edge Hill Bog is gross, and it's supposed to be.It is the first man-made bog created to remove pollutants and to provide a haven for rare plants. The first in the region, probably the first in the country, Keith Underwood of Annapolis, who designed it, said proudly.
FEATURES
Tim Wheeler | March 8, 2012
Maryland's threatened little bog turtles may be getting some extra help from the state's farmers, under a new federal conservation initiative. Obama adminstration officials are slated to unveil today (3/8) a $33 million bid to make more farmers and other landowners partners - instead of potential adversaries - in efforts to save seven rare and endangered critters, including North America's smallest turtle, which in Maryland is found here and there in marshy spots in Carroll, Baltimore, Harford and Cecil counties.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,mary.gail.hare@baltsun.com | August 20, 2009
After years of delays in getting Fort Howard redeveloped as a retirement community for veterans, the Department of Veterans Affairs on Wednesday scrapped those plans and said it will seek a new partner for the project. Fort Howard Senior Housing Association had signed a 75-year lease with the VA in 2004 to build what would have been the nation's largest continuing-care community for veterans. But the project, Bayside at Fort Howard, had become enmeshed in disputes over building permits, zoning regulations and taxes.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,michael.sragow@baltsun.com | June 19, 2009
Mrs. Whitaker, the horrific head of a declining upper-class English household in Noel Coward's 1924 play Easy Virtue, snorts that the name of her new daughter-in-law, Larita, the archetypal woman with a past, is "excellent for musical comedy." The director of the new movie version, Stephan Elliott, who also co-wrote the script with Sheridan Jobbins, has taken that line as his clue for how to pep up Coward's musty period piece. He's made a movie full of audiovisual japery, including a soundtrack laced with Coward and Cole Porter songs and tunes such as "Sex Bomb" and "Car Wash" done in faux-Roaring Twenties style.
BUSINESS
By EILEEN AMBROSE | June 14, 2009
If you're underpaid and overburdened by federal student loans, you're in for some relief. A new loan repayment plan kicks in next month that can significantly reduce your monthly payment - in some cases drop it to zero - and will forgive any lingering debt after 25 years. "People need this more than ever. It's making its debut at the right time," says Edie Irons, a spokeswoman with the Project on Student Debt. The new Income Based Repayment Plan is just one of the borrower-friendly provisions taking effect next month in the federal loan program.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,michael.dresser@baltsun.com | May 27, 2009
A herd of goats coming to the rescue of a handful of imperiled turtles may sound like the plot of a Saturday morning children's cartoon show, but that's just what's happening in the Carroll County town of Hampstead. The State Highway Administration has enlisted the help of about 40 goats to devour invasive plant species in wetlands along the path of the soon-to-open, 4.4-mile Hampstead Bypass to protect the habitat of the bog turtle - a species listed as threatened in Maryland. State highway officials decided to give the goats a tryout as four-legged lawn mowers rather than to attack the unwanted vegetation with mechanical mowers that might have killed the diminutive reptiles or damaged their boggy habitat on the fringe of Hampstead.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,Sun movie critic | July 2, 2008
Hancock , the redemption tale of a feckless Los Angeles superhero, is named, in a roundabout way, for John Hancock, the patriot with the indelible signature. But it might as well have been named for the insurance company. The first half is diverting and inventive. But the filmmakers use the second half as a box-office insurance policy. They fill it with the conventional super-heroics and heartbreak that they spend the first 45 minutes gleefully deconstructing. Hancock swings into action in ragged street clothes: Tthe only "costume" he wears is a wool watch cap with an eagle stitched into the front of it. Mostly he sports 10 different kinds of grimaces as he demonstrates super-strength, the power of flight and an ultra-blase attitude to any piece of machinery or property that gets in his way. Happily, Will Smith is just as creative and persuasive as a homeless superman as he was playing the homeless businessman in The Pursuit of Happyness.
NEWS
By Stephanie Desmon and Stephanie Desmon,SUN STAFF | June 22, 2001
When it rains, the water races down the camp's paved road -- picking up the trail of pollutants in its way -- and pours through a giant pipe until it is dumped into the defenseless Severn River. It's a poor lesson in doing what is good for the environment for the 26,000 students a year who visit Arlington Echo Outdoor Education Center in Millersville. Yesterday -- with the help of 92 fourth-, fifth- and sixth-grade campers from throughout Anne Arundel County and two grownups the kids gleefully called "The Bog Men" -- the cleanup began with the construction of a wetland bog where the drainage pipe used to be. The bog -- a pond surrounded by sandy soil and peat moss, and nourished with carnivorous pitcher plants, rare Atlantic white cedar trees, blue flag irises and more -- acts like the filter in an aquarium, with each part working to remove the oil and nitrogen and more before runoff enters the Chesapeake Bay. Now there's a new lesson to be taught.
NEWS
By Douglas Birch and Douglas Birch,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | August 2, 2002
SHATURA, Russia - The white clouds rise from the ground, from among the birch and cedar trees. Dry peat crackles underfoot. Firefighters appear and vanish in the ghostly, drifting haze. And a hundred miles to the north, in Moscow, the air is filled with a choking, acrid smoke. More than 120 smoldering fires in peat bogs here have created the worst pall to hang over Moscow in 30 years - since the bog fires of 1972. These creeping, hard-to-extinguish fires also threaten homes and forests, and a dozen spring up every day. So quickly are the fires spreading, authorities are considering diverting rivers to flood a swath of the land in hope of extinguishing them.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,sun reporter | August 29, 2007
Between the muck and the poison ivy, interest was scant in the Olde Severna Park community in exploring the soggy area along Sullivan Cove that was hidden by dense bramble. But treks in recent weeks have revealed the site is a bog - an unusual type of wetland characterized by wobbling mats of peat floating on cold, clear water. The water level barely changes despite the season. Maryland environmental officials are recommending adding the discovery to a regulated list of Wetlands of Special State Concern, giving it additional protections, said Kim Lamphier, a spokeswoman for the Maryland Department of the Environment.
SPORTS
By HEATHER A. DINICH | July 25, 2007
For Ralph Friedgen's birthday this summer, his two brothers-in-law and cousin paid for a deep-sea fishing trip. It was canceled because of the weather, but they decided to go out anyway. One brother-in-law drove the boat onto an oyster bed. Friedgen was in the back of the boat. The tide was going down quickly. Friedgen realized that if they were going to get off the oyster bed, he had to jump off the boat. They pushed it off, but Friedgen got stuck about waist-deep in something akin to quicksand.
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