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By Edward Gunts, The Baltimore Sun | June 14, 2010
The Boeing Co. is the latest defense contractor to lease space in Aberdeen as part of the federal government's base realignment and closure program. Boeing leased 5,490 square feet of space from St. John Properties at the Government and Technology Enterprise project, a 413-acre business community under construction within the Aberdeen Proving Ground in Harford Co., and plans to move 25 employees to 6245 Guardian Gateway by fall. The Chicago-based contractor is coming to Harford County to support the Command, Control, Computer, Communication, Intelligence, Surveillance and Reconnaissance (C4ISR)
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By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | April 23, 2013
The only thing missing from “Boeing-Boeing,” the 1960s farce about a man practicing polygamy-before-marriage with three flight attendants from three different countries, is a disembodied voice announcing “severe turbulence ahead.” Even without that warning, it's obvious from take-off exactly where Marc Camoletti's play is heading. It sure takes its sweet time getting there. To rise above the broadly drawn and belabored parts of the script and generate something memorably comic requires more flair and propulsion than is summoned in Rep Stage's so-so season-closing revival.
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NEWS
April 8, 1994
On Feb. 8, 1933, a revolutionary new aircraft lifted off the ground at the Boeing Aircraft Company's Seattle, Wash., test field and took to the skies on its maiden flight over Puget Sound. Dubbed the Model 247, the plane's cantilevered all-metal wings, stressed-skin construction, retractable landing gear and wing-mounted engines with aerodynamic cowls made it the most advanced commercial airliner ever built -- and at a gross weight of 12,650 pounds, the biggest as well.As the sleek craft was put through its paces, a Boeing engineer was said to have remarked proudly: "They'll never build them any bigger."
NEWS
By Mike Giuliano | April 22, 2013
Not every play strives to deliver profound insights into the human condition. Marc Camoletti's "Boeing Boeing" only seeks to prove that the human condition is silly. Judging from the laughter at the Rep Stage production, the audience gets the point. This French play neatly fits within that culture's tradition of farce, in which the complications of amorous misbehavior reach ridiculous extremes. Set in an apartment near an airport in Paris, "Boeing Boeing" has a classically farcical premise.
NEWS
By CHICAGO TRIBUNE | May 11, 2006
WASHINGTON -- Boeing Co. said yesterday that it has hired Judge J. Michael Luttig of the 4th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals to be its top in-house lawyer - an unconventional choice for the aerospace giant that is seeking to restore its reputation after high-profile ethics scandals. Luttig, once on the short list for a nomination to the Supreme Court, will succeed Douglas Bain as senior vice president and general counsel. Bain, 57, plans to retire July 1 after 24 years with the company. He spent the past six as general counsel.
BUSINESS
By AMEET SACHDEV and AMEET SACHDEV,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | May 16, 2006
Boeing Co. has reached a tentative settlement of two separate federal criminal investigations into its defense business, agreeing to pay $615 million to the government, senior Justice Department officials confirmed yesterday. Boeing would pay $565 million to cover civil claims and $50 million to settle criminal inquiries, according to the company and Justice Department officials who spoke to reporters on a conference call. The pending deal exacts one of the largest financial penalties ever imposed on a military contractor but allows the company to avoid criminal charges or any admission of wrongdoing, the officials said on condition of anonymity because the settlement has not been finalized.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | July 28, 1994
WASHINGTON -- Federal Aviation Administration officials were concerned about the economic well-being and image of the Boeing company when they pondered whether to adopt measures to prevent accidents caused by potentially deadly wake turbulence from Boeing 757 jetliners, internal documents show.In January, as the FAA was deciding what to do about Boeing 757 turbulence after the phenomenon had been linked to two fatal crashes, agency officials expressed concerns about how new safety measures would affect sales of the popular, fuel-efficient jetliner.
NEWS
By Seattle Post-Intelligencer | December 8, 1993
SEATTLE -- Engine struts on at least 700 Boeing 747 and 767 jets have been installed improperly, forcing the company to recheck up to 200,000 bolts on the airplanes and spend millions of dollars in the process.Meanwhile, the Federal Aviation Administration is investigating the Boeing Co.'s manufacturing procedures and reviewing the long-term safety impact.Boeing and FAA officials said yesterday that the problem does not pose immediate safety concerns for airline passengers.FAA spokesman Dave Duff, however, said the agency is reviewing the possibility that some of the metal plates in the struts could weaken over time.
BUSINESS
By Bloomberg Business News | May 14, 1994
WASHINGTON -- USAir Group Inc. has deferred delivery of 40 Boeing 737 aircraft amid signs that competition from low-cost carriers is worsening the company's financial outlook.The Arlington, Va., airline also plans to forgo options to purchase another 76 Boeing jets, according to documents the company filed yesterday with the Securities and Exchange Commission. The deferrals, along with the cancellations, will substantially reduce USAir's capital expenditures between 1995 and 2001, the airline said.
NEWS
By Hanah Cho and Hanah Cho,SUN STAFF | October 1, 2004
Cedar Lane School in Columbia, which educates severely disabled Howard County students, will offer more training and development opportunities to its teachers and support staff this school year thanks to a $15,000 grant. The donation by the Boeing Co. will enable the school to equip teachers with the latest research and techniques for educating students with physical and emotional needs, school officials said yesterday. "We have a staff who are second to none," said Principal Nicholas Girardi, who accepted a check from Boeing officials yesterday.
BUSINESS
By Edward Gunts, The Baltimore Sun | June 14, 2010
The Boeing Co. is the latest defense contractor to lease space in Aberdeen as part of the federal government's base realignment and closure program. Boeing leased 5,490 square feet of space from St. John Properties at the Government and Technology Enterprise project, a 413-acre business community under construction within the Aberdeen Proving Ground in Harford Co., and plans to move 25 employees to 6245 Guardian Gateway by fall. The Chicago-based contractor is coming to Harford County to support the Command, Control, Computer, Communication, Intelligence, Surveillance and Reconnaissance (C4ISR)
BUSINESS
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | June 7, 2010
Middle River Aircraft Systems will hire 200 people at its eastern Baltimore County plant during the next year to build brake systems for a redesigned jet that aircraft developer Boeing will soon bring to market. The additional jobs will raise the number of employees at the 1.7 million-square-foot plant to 1,000 at a time when most companies are still wary about hiring even as the economy shows signs of bottoming out. The planned hirings are a bright spot for the state's embattled manufacturing sector, which had been slowly deteriorating years before the recession hit. "This shows that companies like Middle River that really know how to embrace next-generation manufacturing can have job growth," said Mike Galiazzo, executive director of the Regional Manufacturing Institute.
BUSINESS
By From news services | December 23, 2009
EVERETT, Wash. - Boeing's second 787 has flown for a little more than two hours. The jet took off Tuesday from Everett's Paine Field and landed at Boeing Field in Seattle. The Seattle Times reports there was a problem with the plane's landing gear. Boeing says the problem was fixed in the air and that the aircraft and its two pilots were never in danger. The initial flight of a 787 took place a week ago. The 787 program has been plagued by ill-fitting parts and other problems.
BUSINESS
December 23, 2009
EVERETT, Wash. - Boeing's second 787 has flown for a little more than two hours. The jet took off Tuesday from Everett's Paine Field and landed at Boeing Field in Seattle. The Seattle Times reports there was a problem with the plane's landing gear. Boeing says the problem was fixed in the air and that the aircraft and its two pilots were never in danger. The initial flight of a 787 took place a week ago. The 787 program has been plagued by ill-fitting parts and other problems.
BUSINESS
December 16, 2009
For the first time, a passenger jetliner with a body and wings made of super-hardened plastics took wing Tuesday, a milestone that promises to usher in a new era in aviation. A crowd of 12,000 workers and dignitaries lining Paine Field in Everett, Wash., watched as the Boeing 787 Dreamliner roared down the runway, lifted its nose into the air and then flew north as two chase planes trailed. The plane circled over the Puget Sound for three hours, as 787 chief pilot Michael Carriker and co-pilot Randy Neville tested the 787's state-of-the-art wing and electronics systems in a series of turns, climbs and descents.
NEWS
November 3, 2008
Boeing workers end strike after eight weeks SEATTLE : Factories at Boeing Co. were due to start humming again yesterday after Machinists union members voted to end a costly eight-week strike that clipped profits and stalled deliveries by the world's No. 2 commercial airplane maker. Workers were expected to return last night to Boeing's commercial airplane factories, which have been closed since the Sept. 6 walkout. The strike cost an estimated $100 million a day in deferred revenue and production delays on the company's highly anticipated next-generation passenger jet. Machinists union members ended their walkout Saturday by ratifying a new contract with Boeing.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | August 21, 1991
WASHINGTON -- In their first suggestion that a mechanical flaw might have caused a fatal jetliner crash in Colorado five months ago, accident investigators recommended yesterday inspections of the rudder controls on Boeing 737 and 727 jets.Although the investigators, from the National Transportation Safety Board, said they still had not figured out why the 737 crashed in Colorado, they said they had detected a problem that could cause the rudder to move on its own, making the plane difficult to control.
BUSINESS
November 7, 1997
Bethesda-based Lockheed Martin Corp. and Boeing Co. will both build new rockets for the U.S. Air Force, as the service has discarded its plan to select just one producer.Col. Richard McKinney, director of the program known as the Evolved Expendable Launch Vehicle, said the U.S. Defense Department's civilian leadership has approved changing the program strategy.The EELV program was set up for the Air Force to be the primary customer, with rockets also being produced for commercial users. That has now been reversed.
BUSINESS
By JAY HANCOCK | July 25, 2008
In 1993, Defense Secretary Les Aspin invited more than a dozen CEOs of big weapons and aerospace companies to dinner at the Pentagon. In what has become known as the Last Supper, he shocked them by saying that, with the end of the Cold War, America had too many defense contractors and that the companies needed to merge or die. Merge they did. But 15 years later, as the fiasco with the Air Force's tanker contract and widespread Pentagon procurement dysfunction...
BUSINESS
By New York Times News Service | June 19, 2008
The Government Accountability Office has backed Boeing's protest of the awarding of a multibillion-dollar contract for refueling tankers to Northrop Grumman and a European partner, saying the Air Force made errors during the process. The GAO, the investigative arm of Congress, recommended yesterday that the Air Force reopen the bidding and obtain revised proposals. The $40 billion tanker program is the Air Force's No. 1 priority, intended to replace a fleet of aerial refueling tankers - which provide fuel to fighter jets and cargo planes in midair - that date back to the Eisenhower administration and which are being stressed in wars in Iraq and Afghanistan.
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