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By FROM WEB REPORTS | May 16, 2007
Syracuse assistant Mike Hopkins officially will be named as Jim Boeheim's successor as men's basketball coach, ESPN.com reported. There is no timetable for Hopkins to replace Boeheim, but Hopkins and the university have reached an agreement to put a succession plan in writing. The move has been in the works for months, but final details are being worked out in Hopkins' current contract. Boeheim, 62, won the 2003 national title with Hopkins on his staff and Towson Catholic alum Carmelo Anthony on the court.
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By Jeff Barker and The Baltimore Sun | February 24, 2014
Maryland coach Mark Turgeon said the officials missed a foul committed by Syracuse against Terps swingman Nick Faust with Syracuse leading by one point and seven seconds remaining  in the Orange's 57-55 victory on Monday night. But Syracuse coach Jim Boeheim said it is his team - not Maryland -- that earned the right to  gripe about missed foul calls. “Well first of all, let me just tell you this,” Boeheim said. “They shot 27 free throws. If anybody is going to complain about the officiating, I'm going to complain.
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By Ken Murray and Paul McMullen and Ken Murray and Paul McMullen,SUN STAFF | March 30, 1996
EAST RUTHERFORD, N.J. -- It has been said that Syracuse's entry in the Final Four this year marks one of Jim Boeheim's best coaching jobs.Boeheim doesn't agree."
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December 4, 2011
What has he done wrong? K.C. Johnson Chicago Tribune Jim Boeheim's only crime thus far is one of ignorance — and arrogance. Unless it comes out that he had direct knowledge of Bernie Fine's lifestyle, he should keep his jobs with Syracuse and the U.S. Olympic team. Boeheim's initial condescending reaction to allegations against Fine runs consistent with the holier-than-thou attitude of many major college coaches, but he since has apologized for those remarks.
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By Kevin Van Valkenburg and Kevin Van Valkenburg,SUN STAFF | March 20, 2004
DENVER - When Gerry McNamara was a senior at Bishop Hannan High School in Scranton, Pa., three years ago, Syracuse coach Jim Boeheim was so determined to sign him, he even recruited McNamara in his sleep. No joke. Boeheim was exhausted one day during the NCAA's open recruiting period, but he wasn't about to lose a player from his own hometown to Duke or Florida, so he climbed in his car, and drove the two hours from Syracuse, N.Y., to Scranton. McNamara was playing in a meaningless game against an inferior opponent, and it was going to be a blowout, but Boehiem didn't care.
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By Kevin Van Valkenburg and Kevin Van Valkenburg,SUN STAFF | April 8, 2003
NEW ORLEANS - Coach Jim Boeheim said that Derrick Coleman believes to this day he lost the 1987 national championship game for Syracuse because he couldn't hit free throws late against Indiana. After last night, Kansas' Nick Collison and Jeff Graves may be haunted by the same demons. The pair of forwards, who were spectacular in every other way, went a combined 5-for-17 from the line in the Jayhawks 81-78 loss to Syracuse. As a team, Kansas shot just 40 percent from the line for the game (12-for-30)
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By Gary Lambrecht and Gary Lambrecht,SUN STAFF | April 25, 2003
After needing only one season to showcase his prodigious talent and take his school where it never had gone before, Melo officially is moving on. Syracuse University freshman forward Carmelo Anthony, who led the Orangemen to their first NCAA men's basketball championship 18 days ago, made his much-anticipated decision a formality yesterday by announcing he would skip his final three years of school to enter the NBA draft on June 26. Anthony, who grew...
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By Kevin Van Valkenburg and Kevin Van Valkenburg,SUN STAFF | April 8, 2003
NEW ORLEANS - With academic scandals at Georgia, Fresno State and St. Bonaventure dominating headlines in college basketball this season, there has been plenty of talk at the men's Final Four about the NCAA seeking reform. One of the proposals being floated is to punish teams with poor graduation rates by limiting the number of scholarships they can offer. However, NCAA president Myles Brand said this week that before anything like that happens, the NCAA needs to find a new method to count graduation rates.
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By John Eisenberg | April 1, 1996
NEW YORK -- Rick Pitino had just carried his wife over the threshold and put her down on the bed when the phone rang.Jim Boeheim was calling to offer him a job."I'm a little busy right now," Pitino said. "I'm interested, but can we talk later?"No, Boeheim said. He was just an elevator ride away, calling from a house phone in the lobby of the Americana Hotel in midtown Manhattan. The year was 1976 and Boeheim had just been hired as the basketball coach at Syracuse. He was heading out on the road to recruit.
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By Kevin Van Valkenburg and Kevin Van Valkenburg,SUN STAFF | April 7, 2003
NEW ORLEANS - He's a Syracuse freshman who plays like a veteran. He has hit big shots throughout the NCAA tournament, and every coach he has played against has nothing but good things to say about him. And despite what you might think, his name is not Carmelo Anthony. You can certainly say all that and more about Anthony, a 6-foot-8 forward who has been brilliant for the Orangemen this season, but his play makes it easy to overlook the contribution of another freshman, point guard Gerry McNamara.
SPORTS
December 16, 2009
Syracuse coach Jim Boeheim sat at the postgame interview table, his right hand massaging his furrowed brow, as always trying not to sound too optimistic about his good fortune. "Of all the problems you can have in the world, we don't have a lot right now," Boeheim said after last week's 12-point win over then-No. 10 Florida. "We'll probably encounter some problems, but right now we don't have a lot." Unranked and not on the radar of most preseason prognosticators, Syracuse has stormed into the national spotlight with a stunning run of early-season success.
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By FROM WEB REPORTS | May 16, 2007
Syracuse assistant Mike Hopkins officially will be named as Jim Boeheim's successor as men's basketball coach, ESPN.com reported. There is no timetable for Hopkins to replace Boeheim, but Hopkins and the university have reached an agreement to put a succession plan in writing. The move has been in the works for months, but final details are being worked out in Hopkins' current contract. Boeheim, 62, won the 2003 national title with Hopkins on his staff and Towson Catholic alum Carmelo Anthony on the court.
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By Kevin Van Valkenburg and Kevin Van Valkenburg,SUN STAFF | March 21, 2004
DENVER - If Hakim Warrick ever decides to give up basketball, he might want to consider a career as a ballet dancer. For the better part of 40 minutes last night, Syracuse's 6-foot-8 junior forward was so smooth, so graceful, it felt like his movements were choreographed to go with orchestra music. Warrick scored 26 points and grabbed nine rebounds in Syracuse's 72-70 second-round victory over Maryland, but he just as easily could have been playing the lead in Swan Lake. Maryland's post players stood flat-footed for much of the evening as Warrick soared for rebounds, hung in midair to nail jumpers and glided through the lane to finish off a fast break with a ferocious dunk.
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By Gary Lambrecht and Gary Lambrecht,SUN STAFF | March 20, 2004
DENVER - All that is standing between the Maryland Terrapins and their fourth straight trip to the NCAA tournament's round of 16 is a huge scoring threat, a tremendous leaper, a bothersome zone defense and a coach who has been there and done that many times over. This is about as attractive as it gets in a second-round game. No. 19 Maryland against No. 20 Syracuse, pitting the previous two national champions against each other for only the third time in NCAA tournament history. Two coaches in Maryland's Gary Williams and Syracuse's Jim Boeheim with a combined 54 seasons, 1,197 victories and 65 tournament wins on their resumes.
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By Kevin Van Valkenburg and Kevin Van Valkenburg,SUN STAFF | March 20, 2004
DENVER - When Gerry McNamara was a senior at Bishop Hannan High School in Scranton, Pa., three years ago, Syracuse coach Jim Boeheim was so determined to sign him, he even recruited McNamara in his sleep. No joke. Boeheim was exhausted one day during the NCAA's open recruiting period, but he wasn't about to lose a player from his own hometown to Duke or Florida, so he climbed in his car, and drove the two hours from Syracuse, N.Y., to Scranton. McNamara was playing in a meaningless game against an inferior opponent, and it was going to be a blowout, but Boehiem didn't care.
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By Don Markus and Don Markus,SUN STAFF | December 12, 2003
There are signs of Carmelo Anthony all over the campus at Syracuse. From last season's national championship banner that hangs at the Carrier Dome to the replica jerseys of the former freshman phenom - and current NBA rookie sensation - that hang on the racks at the bookstore, Anthony's presence is still felt. Unfortunately for the Orangemen (2-1), his absence is felt even more. It began with an exhibition loss to the Harlem Globetrotters during the preseason, continued with an opening night home defeat at the hands of North Carolina-Charlotte and was still apparent during the team's shaky win over Rhode Island last week.
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By MIKE PRESTON | April 7, 2003
NEW ORLEANS - Either Syracuse's Jim Boeheim or Kansas' Roy Williams will walk away tonight with the title of Best Coach to Never Win The Big One. It's a shame, because it's really undeserved. Regardless of who wins, Boeheim and Williams are two of the best coaches in men's college basketball, and they seemed unaffected by all this attention about being the ultimate loser. What you have are two coaches secure in their jobs, systems and themselves. And they are treating this game the way they should, as just another game.
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By Ken Murray and Ken Murray,SUN STAFF | March 28, 1996
Like three fraternity brothers at a reunion, Kentucky's Rick Pitino, Massachusetts' John Calipari and Syracuse's Jim Boeheim waxed sentimental about their long-standing relationships yesterday in a teleconference involving the Final Four coaches.Then there was Richard Williams, the former math teacher and little-known coach who has taken Mississippi State to its first-ever Final Four.Did he feel like an outsider in the midst of all these old friends?"Not really," Williams said. "I think we'll be playing in the same arena they're playing in."
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By Gary Lambrecht and Gary Lambrecht,SUN STAFF | April 25, 2003
After needing only one season to showcase his prodigious talent and take his school where it never had gone before, Melo officially is moving on. Syracuse University freshman forward Carmelo Anthony, who led the Orangemen to their first NCAA men's basketball championship 18 days ago, made his much-anticipated decision a formality yesterday by announcing he would skip his final three years of school to enter the NBA draft on June 26. Anthony, who grew...
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By Kevin Van Valkenburg and Kevin Van Valkenburg,SUN STAFF | April 9, 2003
NEW ORLEANS - If you believe Syracuse coach Jim Boeheim, Kansas' agonizing night at the free-throw line in Monday's national-championship game - an 81-78 Syracuse win - wasn't a matter of fate or good luck for the Orangemen. It was the result, Boeheim said with a wink, of good coaching. "We tried to foul as much as we could anytime they got the ball inside," said Boeheim, who won his first national championship in his third appearance in the title game. "[Kansas forward] Jeff Graves is a 38 percent free-throw shooter, and I think he went 2-for-7.
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