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Body Worlds

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By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,ed.gunts@baltsun.com | August 30, 2008
A lively display of dead bodies that ends its seven-month run at the Maryland Science Center on Monday has smashed local museum attendance records to become the most popular traveling exhibit in Baltimore history, drawing more than 300,000 visitors, including a few who were so impressed they've offered to donate their bodies for use in the show. Gunther von Hagens' Body Worlds 2: The Original Exhibition of Real Human Bodies, drew 312,258 visitors as of yesterday evening. That was far more than twice the science center's previous record of 120,000 for a seven-month-long traveling exhibit in 2005 that featured artifacts from the Titanic.
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NEWS
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,ed.gunts@baltsun.com | August 30, 2008
A lively display of dead bodies that ends its seven-month run at the Maryland Science Center on Monday has smashed local museum attendance records to become the most popular traveling exhibit in Baltimore history, drawing more than 300,000 visitors, including a few who were so impressed they've offered to donate their bodies for use in the show. Gunther von Hagens' Body Worlds 2: The Original Exhibition of Real Human Bodies, drew 312,258 visitors as of yesterday evening. That was far more than twice the science center's previous record of 120,000 for a seven-month-long traveling exhibit in 2005 that featured artifacts from the Titanic.
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FEATURES
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,Sun art critic | April 1, 2008
For centuries, art students sketched the nude human body to sharpen their eyes and hone their skills. But you don't have to be a budding Michelangelo to join the life drawing class tonight at the Maryland Science Center. As part of its Body Worlds 2 exhibition, the center is giving anyone with an interest in drawing a chance to try his or her hand at sketching the human figure using male and female models hired for the occasion as well as the plastinated human specimens featured in the show.
NEWS
By SLOANE BROWN | May 18, 2008
THE HENRY A. ROSENBERG SR. DISTINguished Citizen Award Dinner may be an annual fundraising tradition for the Boy Scouts of America. But the 2008 version was anything but traditional. This year, instead of listening to speeches about a chosen honoree, guests at the Maryland Science Center were encouraged to tour the center's smash hit of a show, Body Worlds 2 -- the exhibit that shows the inner workings of the human body using real human bodies. "I happen to be on the board of the Maryland Science Center.
NEWS
By Karin Klein | March 26, 2008
Late to every trend, I missed the first Body Worlds show at the California Science Center. Also the second. It was too much for my morbid soul, this notion of bodies preserved by replacing water with polymers, flayed and partly filleted to reveal their innermost selves, then posed jauntily for exhibit. I heard that people loved it. Ugh. Some were even inspired to donate their own bodies. Lunatic. As it happened, the media invitation to view Body Worlds 3 arrived at a vulnerable moment.
BUSINESS
By Andrea K. Walker and Andrea K. Walker,SUN REPORTER | April 4, 2008
You wouldn't think people would line up to see dead bodies - and pay for the privilege. But that is exactly what's happening at the Maryland Science Center in what is shaping up to be its largest and most profitable exhibit ever. In the next few days, the Science Center is expected to welcome its 100,000th visitor to Gunther von Hagens' Body Worlds 2: The Anatomical Exhibition of Real Human Bodies. The exhibit, which opened in February, uses dissected cadavers to show the inner workings of the human body.
NEWS
By Diane Haithman and Diane Haithman,LOS ANGELES TIMES | June 27, 2004
LOS ANGELES - Laker, or Clipper? Hard to tell with this basketball player. Not only is he not wearing a team jersey - he is not wearing skin. This nameless, skinless "athlete" has just arrived in Los Angeles from Germany, to be part of the U.S. premiere of Body Worlds: The Anatomical Exhibition of Real Human Bodies, opening Friday at the California Science Center. On display will be more than 200 human specimens, about 25 of them whole bodies, each preserved through a "plastination" technique.
NEWS
By Janet Gilbert | March 23, 2008
I am gearing up to see the Body Worlds exhibit at the Baltimore Science Center. From what I have read, I don't think I could have dreamed up a more bizarre yet impressive tool for the study of human anatomy and physiology. Apparently, in 1977, when my biggest concern was coming up with the perfect prom dress, Dr. Gunther von Hagens was coming up with a method he called plastination. Plastination halts the decay process in deceased humans by removing fats and water from the body and infusing it with polymers -- basically preserving it from the inside out. Body Worlds puts these individuals on display in life-like scenarios.
FEATURES
By KEVIN COWHERD | April 23, 2008
I have just returned from seeing Body Worlds 2, the popular exhibit at the Maryland Science Center that uses real bodies to display the human anatomy and makes us realize it's a good thing we have flesh covering our insides, or we'd all look like extras in a George Romero movie. The bodies are preserved by a process called plastination, which involves extracting bodily fluids and soluble fat and replacing them with polymers, something half of Hollywood is probably looking into right now. There has been some controversy surrounding Body Worlds, mainly rumors that some of the body donations have not exactly been voluntary.
NEWS
By SLOANE BROWN | May 18, 2008
THE HENRY A. ROSENBERG SR. DISTINguished Citizen Award Dinner may be an annual fundraising tradition for the Boy Scouts of America. But the 2008 version was anything but traditional. This year, instead of listening to speeches about a chosen honoree, guests at the Maryland Science Center were encouraged to tour the center's smash hit of a show, Body Worlds 2 -- the exhibit that shows the inner workings of the human body using real human bodies. "I happen to be on the board of the Maryland Science Center.
FEATURES
By KEVIN COWHERD | April 23, 2008
I have just returned from seeing Body Worlds 2, the popular exhibit at the Maryland Science Center that uses real bodies to display the human anatomy and makes us realize it's a good thing we have flesh covering our insides, or we'd all look like extras in a George Romero movie. The bodies are preserved by a process called plastination, which involves extracting bodily fluids and soluble fat and replacing them with polymers, something half of Hollywood is probably looking into right now. There has been some controversy surrounding Body Worlds, mainly rumors that some of the body donations have not exactly been voluntary.
BUSINESS
By Andrea K. Walker and Andrea K. Walker,SUN REPORTER | April 4, 2008
You wouldn't think people would line up to see dead bodies - and pay for the privilege. But that is exactly what's happening at the Maryland Science Center in what is shaping up to be its largest and most profitable exhibit ever. In the next few days, the Science Center is expected to welcome its 100,000th visitor to Gunther von Hagens' Body Worlds 2: The Anatomical Exhibition of Real Human Bodies. The exhibit, which opened in February, uses dissected cadavers to show the inner workings of the human body.
FEATURES
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,Sun art critic | April 1, 2008
For centuries, art students sketched the nude human body to sharpen their eyes and hone their skills. But you don't have to be a budding Michelangelo to join the life drawing class tonight at the Maryland Science Center. As part of its Body Worlds 2 exhibition, the center is giving anyone with an interest in drawing a chance to try his or her hand at sketching the human figure using male and female models hired for the occasion as well as the plastinated human specimens featured in the show.
NEWS
By Karin Klein | March 26, 2008
Late to every trend, I missed the first Body Worlds show at the California Science Center. Also the second. It was too much for my morbid soul, this notion of bodies preserved by replacing water with polymers, flayed and partly filleted to reveal their innermost selves, then posed jauntily for exhibit. I heard that people loved it. Ugh. Some were even inspired to donate their own bodies. Lunatic. As it happened, the media invitation to view Body Worlds 3 arrived at a vulnerable moment.
NEWS
By Janet Gilbert | March 23, 2008
I am gearing up to see the Body Worlds exhibit at the Baltimore Science Center. From what I have read, I don't think I could have dreamed up a more bizarre yet impressive tool for the study of human anatomy and physiology. Apparently, in 1977, when my biggest concern was coming up with the perfect prom dress, Dr. Gunther von Hagens was coming up with a method he called plastination. Plastination halts the decay process in deceased humans by removing fats and water from the body and infusing it with polymers -- basically preserving it from the inside out. Body Worlds puts these individuals on display in life-like scenarios.
FEATURES
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,SUN ART CRITIC | February 2, 2008
In an increasingly health-conscious society, a sparkling exhibition about the body's inner workings that opens today at the Maryland Science Center may be just what the doctor ordered. Gunther von Hagens' Body Worlds 2: The Anatomical Exhibition of Real Human Bodies presents scores of anatomical specimens in lifelike poses, but shorn of their sheath of skin to reveal the organs, bones, muscles and nerves underneath, down to the smallest detail. If you go Gunther von Hagens' Body Worlds 2: The Anatomical Exhibition of Real Human Bodies opens today at the Maryland Science Center, 601 Light St. Call 410-685-5225 or go to mdsci.
FEATURES
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,SUN ART CRITIC | February 2, 2008
In an increasingly health-conscious society, a sparkling exhibition about the body's inner workings that opens today at the Maryland Science Center may be just what the doctor ordered. Gunther von Hagens' Body Worlds 2: The Anatomical Exhibition of Real Human Bodies presents scores of anatomical specimens in lifelike poses, but shorn of their sheath of skin to reveal the organs, bones, muscles and nerves underneath, down to the smallest detail. If you go Gunther von Hagens' Body Worlds 2: The Anatomical Exhibition of Real Human Bodies opens today at the Maryland Science Center, 601 Light St. Call 410-685-5225 or go to mdsci.
BUSINESS
By Kevin Thomas and Kevin Thomas,Evening Sun Staff | June 7, 1991
Not many business people would view Hoka-Hai as something they would want to name a new business.Loosely translated from the American Indian, it means "today is a good day to die."But for Scott Samios and Skip Maner, Hoka-Hai expresses the devil-may-care attitude they have toward running a business. So they named their company Hoka-Hai Trading Co. and set out to purchase a franchise from one of the fastest growing retail companies in the world.Now, as owners of the Body Shop in White Marsh, Samios and Maner, both 24, are peddling skin- and hair-care products with the gusto of free-falling sky divers.
NEWS
By Diane Haithman and Diane Haithman,LOS ANGELES TIMES | June 27, 2004
LOS ANGELES - Laker, or Clipper? Hard to tell with this basketball player. Not only is he not wearing a team jersey - he is not wearing skin. This nameless, skinless "athlete" has just arrived in Los Angeles from Germany, to be part of the U.S. premiere of Body Worlds: The Anatomical Exhibition of Real Human Bodies, opening Friday at the California Science Center. On display will be more than 200 human specimens, about 25 of them whole bodies, each preserved through a "plastination" technique.
SPORTS
By Jamison Hensley and Jamison Hensley,CONTRIBUTING WRITER | March 12, 1998
A walk through the Lacrosse Museum earlier this week meant side-stepping loose boards and stepping aside as employees worked feverishly to finish exhibits. A short stroll away at Homewood Field, pounding and clanging continued on the stands being added for the world lacrosse championships this summer.Amid the confusion of construction, however, lacrosse hasn't been more organized. In one of the sport's most eventful years, a number of independent organizations have merged to form US Lacrosse, a national governing body located on the Johns Hopkins campus.
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