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By Justin George, The Baltimore Sun | August 25, 2014
Autopsy results showing that Morgan State University football player Marquese Meadow died of heat stroke have prompted his mother to question whether coaches and trainers monitored the heat at practice or gave players enough water breaks. Meadow, an 18-year-old freshman from Washington, D.C., died early Sunday after being hospitalized for two weeks. School officials said he became disoriented after an Aug. 10 football practice. His death has been ruled accidental, said Bruce Goldfarb, spokesman for the Office of the Chief Medical Examiner.
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NEWS
By Justin George, The Baltimore Sun | August 25, 2014
Autopsy results showing that Morgan State University football player Marquese Meadow died of heat stroke have prompted his mother to question whether coaches and trainers monitored the heat at practice or gave players enough water breaks. Meadow, an 18-year-old freshman from Washington, D.C., died early Sunday after being hospitalized for two weeks. School officials said he became disoriented after an Aug. 10 football practice. His death has been ruled accidental, said Bruce Goldfarb, spokesman for the Office of the Chief Medical Examiner.
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FEATURES
By Dr. Gabe Mirkin and Dr. Gabe Mirkin,Contributing Writer United Features Syndicate | November 30, 1993
Your center of gravity is the spot in your body with equal weight in front and in back. Every motion you make is aimed at keeping your body balanced around your center of gravity. When you run and move one part of your body forward, you must move another backward to keep you from falling on your face. When you move your left leg forward, you must also move your right arm forward and your left arm backward.People with poor running form often look funny because when they move their right leg forward, they don't move their left arm forward fast enough.
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | July 8, 2013
The Baltimore County state's attorney's office will determine whether to pursue charges against a Lansdowne man in the death of a 16-month-old girl who was left in a hot truck for four hours Friday. The medical examiner's office ruled that Sybriya Towels' death was accidental and gave the cause as hyperthermia, the medical term for excessively high body temperatures. Police have not identified the male relative involved in the case but said he failed to drop the girl off at day care and left her in his truck.
NEWS
By Jonathan Bor and Jonathan Bor,SUN STAFF | April 9, 1997
In a study that could end the unforgettable chill that goes with surgery, doctors at the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine found that a heated blanket can reduce cardiac complications by more than half.Now, they are ready to issue this simple advice: Keep the patient warm."There is a reason why people live at 98.6 degrees," said Dr. Steven M. Frank, lead author of the study that appears in today's Journal of the American Medical Association. "We've been focusing on heart rate and blood pressure for 100 years but only recently on body temperature."
FEATURES
By Gabe Mirkin, M.D. and Gabe Mirkin, M.D.,United Feature Syndicate | May 31, 1994
The most common time for people to die of heat stroke is in late spring or early summer, when the weather suddenly turns warm. It takes a week of exercising in the heat for your body to acclimate to it. If you try to exercise intensely before your body adjusts to hot weather, you can suffer a heat stroke, which is a sudden uncontrolled rise in body temperature that can cause you to pass out.Your body will give you plenty of warning signs before a heat stroke...
FEATURES
By Wayne Hardin and Wayne Hardin,Staff Writer | January 15, 1994
In the face of cold weather guaranteed to freeze any shivering timbers, it's best to practice some common sense guidelines to protect yourself, says a local doctor.The No. 1 rule: When venturing outside, cover up physical extremities. "Ears, nose, fingers, toes, anything that sticks out," says Dr. Elizabeth Tso, an attending physician in the emergency room at the University of Maryland Medical Center.The deep-freeze temperatures would be bad enough on those extremities the thermometer is not likely to top 25 degrees with lows in the single digits today but high winds will make it feel like 25 to 35 degrees below zero.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | January 31, 2013
At least two cold-weather-related deaths were confirmed in the Baltimore area during last week's snap of frigid weather, and more dangerous cold is in the forecast. Hypothermia was a factor in the deaths of an elderly Baltimore County woman and an elderly Baltimore man during the week that ended Monday, according to a weekly report from state health officials. The total number of cold-weather-related deaths that state medical examiners have confirmed so far this winter has reached 14. Hypothermia occurs when body temperature drops below 95 degrees, causing vital organs to shut down.
FEATURES
By Dr. Gabe Mirkin and Dr. Gabe Mirkin,Special to The Sun United Features Syndicate | February 1, 1994
Bowlers get blisters on their thumbs. Runners get them on their feet, and tennis players and rowers get them on their hands. When you rub an area of skin repeatedly, the friction causes the top layer to separate from the bottom layer, and fluid separates them. Wetness and heat markedly increase your chances of getting blisters. Wetness causes the skin to stick and increases the shearing force on it. Heat increases the chances of the outer layer of skin separating from its lower layer.When you start to develop a blister, your skin will hurt.
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | July 8, 2013
The Baltimore County state's attorney's office will determine whether to pursue charges against a Lansdowne man in the death of a 16-month-old girl who was left in a hot truck for four hours Friday. The medical examiner's office ruled that Sybriya Towels' death was accidental and gave the cause as hyperthermia, the medical term for excessively high body temperatures. Police have not identified the male relative involved in the case but said he failed to drop the girl off at day care and left her in his truck.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | January 31, 2013
At least two cold-weather-related deaths were confirmed in the Baltimore area during last week's snap of frigid weather, and more dangerous cold is in the forecast. Hypothermia was a factor in the deaths of an elderly Baltimore County woman and an elderly Baltimore man during the week that ended Monday, according to a weekly report from state health officials. The total number of cold-weather-related deaths that state medical examiners have confirmed so far this winter has reached 14. Hypothermia occurs when body temperature drops below 95 degrees, causing vital organs to shut down.
NEWS
By RONI RABIN and RONI RABIN,NEWSDAY | October 13, 2005
NEW YORK -- Lowering a newborn's body temperature after birth reduces risk of brain damage and death for babies who are deprived of oxygen before or during delivery, a new study has found. Within hours of being born, newborns in the study were placed on cooling blankets that lowered their body temperature to about 92 degrees. The blankets, which had water circulating through them, were set at 41 degrees. After three days, the babies were gradually warmed to a normal body temperature. The study of 208 infants at 15 medical centers was reported by researchers in the Neonatal Research Network of the Institute of Child Health and Human Development, and appears today in The New England Journal of Medicine.
NEWS
By Michael Stroh and Michael Stroh,SUN STAFF | February 11, 2005
Behind every famous number lies a story. And in this season of sickness, when the thermometer frequently emerges from the bathroom cabinet, few numbers in medicine are as familiar as 98.6 - the normal temperature of the human body. Celebrated in song and enshrined for more than a century in schoolbooks and medical texts, 98.6 degrees Fahrenheit is the benchmark many of us use to determine who goes to school or work and who stays in bed. There's just one little problem: 98.6, it turns out, is a medical myth.
SPORTS
By Jonathan Bor and Jonathan Bor,SUN STAFF | August 2, 2001
In the heat of the summer, you do several things to keep your internal temperature from rising dangerously high. You rest, drink fluids and seek air conditioning. And you sweat, a process that turns your skin into a natural air conditioner. But the athlete who works too hard, doesn't drink enough fluids or plays out of shape on a hot, humid day runs the risk of heat stroke - a condition in which the body's temperature spirals out of control. "The body is working as hard as it can to keep temperature under control," said Dr. Brian Browne, chief of emergency medicine at the University of Maryland Medical Center.
NEWS
By Jonathan Bor and Jonathan Bor,SUN STAFF | April 9, 1997
In a study that could end the unforgettable chill that goes with surgery, doctors at the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine found that a heated blanket can reduce cardiac complications by more than half.Now, they are ready to issue this simple advice: Keep the patient warm."There is a reason why people live at 98.6 degrees," said Dr. Steven M. Frank, lead author of the study that appears in today's Journal of the American Medical Association. "We've been focusing on heart rate and blood pressure for 100 years but only recently on body temperature."
FEATURES
By Gabe Mirkin, M.D. and Gabe Mirkin, M.D.,United Feature Syndicate | May 31, 1994
The most common time for people to die of heat stroke is in late spring or early summer, when the weather suddenly turns warm. It takes a week of exercising in the heat for your body to acclimate to it. If you try to exercise intensely before your body adjusts to hot weather, you can suffer a heat stroke, which is a sudden uncontrolled rise in body temperature that can cause you to pass out.Your body will give you plenty of warning signs before a heat stroke...
NEWS
By RONI RABIN and RONI RABIN,NEWSDAY | October 13, 2005
NEW YORK -- Lowering a newborn's body temperature after birth reduces risk of brain damage and death for babies who are deprived of oxygen before or during delivery, a new study has found. Within hours of being born, newborns in the study were placed on cooling blankets that lowered their body temperature to about 92 degrees. The blankets, which had water circulating through them, were set at 41 degrees. After three days, the babies were gradually warmed to a normal body temperature. The study of 208 infants at 15 medical centers was reported by researchers in the Neonatal Research Network of the Institute of Child Health and Human Development, and appears today in The New England Journal of Medicine.
NEWS
By Michael Stroh and Michael Stroh,SUN STAFF | February 11, 2005
Behind every famous number lies a story. And in this season of sickness, when the thermometer frequently emerges from the bathroom cabinet, few numbers in medicine are as familiar as 98.6 - the normal temperature of the human body. Celebrated in song and enshrined for more than a century in schoolbooks and medical texts, 98.6 degrees Fahrenheit is the benchmark many of us use to determine who goes to school or work and who stays in bed. There's just one little problem: 98.6, it turns out, is a medical myth.
FEATURES
By Dr. Gabe Mirkin and Dr. Gabe Mirkin,Special to The Sun United Features Syndicate | February 1, 1994
Bowlers get blisters on their thumbs. Runners get them on their feet, and tennis players and rowers get them on their hands. When you rub an area of skin repeatedly, the friction causes the top layer to separate from the bottom layer, and fluid separates them. Wetness and heat markedly increase your chances of getting blisters. Wetness causes the skin to stick and increases the shearing force on it. Heat increases the chances of the outer layer of skin separating from its lower layer.When you start to develop a blister, your skin will hurt.
FEATURES
By Wayne Hardin and Wayne Hardin,Staff Writer | January 15, 1994
In the face of cold weather guaranteed to freeze any shivering timbers, it's best to practice some common sense guidelines to protect yourself, says a local doctor.The No. 1 rule: When venturing outside, cover up physical extremities. "Ears, nose, fingers, toes, anything that sticks out," says Dr. Elizabeth Tso, an attending physician in the emergency room at the University of Maryland Medical Center.The deep-freeze temperatures would be bad enough on those extremities the thermometer is not likely to top 25 degrees with lows in the single digits today but high winds will make it feel like 25 to 35 degrees below zero.
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