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By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | October 22, 1999
Fifteen minutes of story and 84 minutes of camera play -- that's what director Michael Cristofer gives us in "Body Shots," a film that starts out as a "Rashomon"-like examination of date rape, but fizzles out at the end, ending in neither a bang nor a whimper, but a cop-out.And getting to that end isn't half the fun, as Cristofer infuses the film with all manner of slow-motion shots, shadow images, voice-overs, dissolves and replayed images."Body Shots," which focuses on eight friends, four men and four women, out for a night of care-free drinking and carousing until things get ugly between two of them, features strong performances, particularly Tara Reid as the possible rape victim and Ron Livingston as a hopeless shlub who specializes in getting lucky.
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By Robert Przybylo, The Oklahoman | April 24, 2011
Baltimore Ravens safety Tommy Zbikowski knows there are always going to be doubters about how serious he is about boxing. It's easy for people to say he's doing it for the novelty of it — that he's some sideshow attraction. And then you watch him fight. Zbikowski's fourth bout might have been his most impressive, as he scored a first-round technical knockout Saturday night at the WinStar Casino. Zbikowski improved to 4-0 with three of the wins by knockout. "This was my best win since coming back from a five-year layoff," Zbikowski said.
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SPORTS
By MIKE PRESTON | November 17, 2008
EAST RUTHERFORD, N.J. - It wasn't surprising that the New York Giants beat the Ravens yesterday, but how they beat them. In a match up between two smash-mouth football teams, the Giants delivered the most body shots, and several knockout blows in what was supposed to be a statement game for the Ravens. It was. "I was embarrassed," said Ravens defensive end Terrell Suggs. He should be. So should the entire offensive line, and inside linebackers Ray Lewis and Bart Scott. And defensive tackles Haloti Ngata and Justin Bannan.
SPORTS
By MIKE PRESTON | November 17, 2008
EAST RUTHERFORD, N.J. - It wasn't surprising that the New York Giants beat the Ravens yesterday, but how they beat them. In a match up between two smash-mouth football teams, the Giants delivered the most body shots, and several knockout blows in what was supposed to be a statement game for the Ravens. It was. "I was embarrassed," said Ravens defensive end Terrell Suggs. He should be. So should the entire offensive line, and inside linebackers Ray Lewis and Bart Scott. And defensive tackles Haloti Ngata and Justin Bannan.
SPORTS
By Alan Goldstein and Alan Goldstein,Staff Writer | April 16, 1992
Boxing, as Lou Benson, Baltimore's fighting sheriff, discovered, can be a strange business."One minute I'm telling the media I want to fight Mike Tyson in prison," he said. "The next minute I'm telling you I couldn't beat the 10-count."Benson's dream of challenging former heavyweight champion Tyson, who is serving a six-year sentence in Indiana for rape, was exposed as a cruel hoax last night when he was knocked out by youthful Virginia cruiserweight Jason Waller after 45 seconds of the ninth round of their co-feature at the Pikesville Armory.
SPORTS
By Robert Przybylo, The Oklahoman | April 24, 2011
Baltimore Ravens safety Tommy Zbikowski knows there are always going to be doubters about how serious he is about boxing. It's easy for people to say he's doing it for the novelty of it — that he's some sideshow attraction. And then you watch him fight. Zbikowski's fourth bout might have been his most impressive, as he scored a first-round technical knockout Saturday night at the WinStar Casino. Zbikowski improved to 4-0 with three of the wins by knockout. "This was my best win since coming back from a five-year layoff," Zbikowski said.
SPORTS
By Paul McMullen and Paul McMullen,Sun Reporter | January 17, 2007
Gerald Brown and Gary Neal insist that it was not about them, that it was Loyola against Towson. Sure, and you'll want to go to Shaquille O'Neal for free-throw advice and give Gilbert Arenas space off the dribble. Monday night brought a Halley's Comet game to Reitz Arena, where Loyola and Brown played Towson and Neal. How often do Charles Street rivals who aspire to the title of Baltimore's team revolve around former AAU teammates who returned home after starting their college careers elsewhere and happen to be among the nation's top seven scorers?
NEWS
By Dan Thanh Dang and Dan Thanh Dang,Sun Staff Writer | February 1, 1995
Two men found burned beyond recognition early yesterday behind Lansdowne Shopping Center were shot to death before being set on fire, an autopsy yesterday showed.Baltimore County police were able to obtain fingerprints from one victim. Both men were black. One wore a flannel shirt and blue jeans and weighed more than 250 pounds. The other was too severely burned for police to describe his clothing.Investigators are hoping that the fingerprints might lead to an identification. Police also asked anyone who could help identify the men to call 887-2198.
SPORTS
By LEM SATTERFIELD and LEM SATTERFIELD,SUN REPORTER | June 16, 2006
Baltimore lightweight Tyrell Samuel used a body shot at 2:12 of the second round to score his fifth straight knockout and his seventh victory without a loss, defeating Mexico's Magarito Lopez last night at Glen Burnie's Michael's Eighth Avenue. "It's what we've been working on in the gym -- working off the jab with hooks, combinations and body shots and that one was perfect," said Samuel, 24. In another bout, Baltimore welterweight Tim Coleman, 21, earned his fifth victory with a six-round unanimous decision against Mushin Corbbrey (4-1, one KO)
SPORTS
By Alan Goldstein and Alan Goldstein,Staff Writer | April 17, 1992
Reprinted from yesterday's late editions Boxing, as Lou Benson, Baltimore's fighting sheriff, discovered, can be a strange business."One minute I'm telling the media I want to fight Mike Tyson in prison," he said. "The next minute I'm telling you I couldn't beat the 10-count."Benson may be more realistic about challenging former heavyweight champion Tyson, who is serving a six-year sentence in Indiana for rape, after being knocked out Wednesday night by youthful Virginia cruiserweight Jason Waller seconds into the ninth round of their co-feature before 1,600 at the Pikesville Armory.
SPORTS
By Paul McMullen and Paul McMullen,Sun Reporter | January 17, 2007
Gerald Brown and Gary Neal insist that it was not about them, that it was Loyola against Towson. Sure, and you'll want to go to Shaquille O'Neal for free-throw advice and give Gilbert Arenas space off the dribble. Monday night brought a Halley's Comet game to Reitz Arena, where Loyola and Brown played Towson and Neal. How often do Charles Street rivals who aspire to the title of Baltimore's team revolve around former AAU teammates who returned home after starting their college careers elsewhere and happen to be among the nation's top seven scorers?
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | October 22, 1999
Fifteen minutes of story and 84 minutes of camera play -- that's what director Michael Cristofer gives us in "Body Shots," a film that starts out as a "Rashomon"-like examination of date rape, but fizzles out at the end, ending in neither a bang nor a whimper, but a cop-out.And getting to that end isn't half the fun, as Cristofer infuses the film with all manner of slow-motion shots, shadow images, voice-overs, dissolves and replayed images."Body Shots," which focuses on eight friends, four men and four women, out for a night of care-free drinking and carousing until things get ugly between two of them, features strong performances, particularly Tara Reid as the possible rape victim and Ron Livingston as a hopeless shlub who specializes in getting lucky.
NEWS
By Dan Thanh Dang and Dan Thanh Dang,Sun Staff Writer | February 1, 1995
Two men found burned beyond recognition early yesterday behind Lansdowne Shopping Center were shot to death before being set on fire, an autopsy yesterday showed.Baltimore County police were able to obtain fingerprints from one victim. Both men were black. One wore a flannel shirt and blue jeans and weighed more than 250 pounds. The other was too severely burned for police to describe his clothing.Investigators are hoping that the fingerprints might lead to an identification. Police also asked anyone who could help identify the men to call 887-2198.
SPORTS
By Alan Goldstein and Alan Goldstein,Staff Writer | April 16, 1992
Boxing, as Lou Benson, Baltimore's fighting sheriff, discovered, can be a strange business."One minute I'm telling the media I want to fight Mike Tyson in prison," he said. "The next minute I'm telling you I couldn't beat the 10-count."Benson's dream of challenging former heavyweight champion Tyson, who is serving a six-year sentence in Indiana for rape, was exposed as a cruel hoax last night when he was knocked out by youthful Virginia cruiserweight Jason Waller after 45 seconds of the ninth round of their co-feature at the Pikesville Armory.
SPORTS
By Alan Goldstein and Alan Goldstein,Staff Writer | April 16, 1992
Boxing, as Lou Benson, Baltimore's fighting sheriff, discovered, can be a strange business."One minute I'm telling the media I want to fight Mike Tyson in prison," he said. "The next minute I'm telling you I couldn't beat the 10-count."Benson's dream of challenging former heavyweight champion Tyson, who is serving a six-year sentence in Indiana for rape, was exposed as a hoax last night when he was knocked out by youthful Virginia cruiserweight Jason Waller after 45 seconds of the ninth round of their co-feature before 1,600 at the Pikesville Armory.
FEATURES
By ROBERT GUY MATTHEWS and ROBERT GUY MATTHEWS,SUN STAFF | November 9, 1998
First came a call from the Wall Street Journal last summer. Then the New York Times. Suddenly, Anne Munoz-Furlong, head of a little-known organization dedicated to food allergies, was being christened the authority on peanuts.She was quoted in just about every newspaper story that followed. Television beckoned. There were guest spots on radio shows across the country. Invites on the lecture circuit picked up.Everyone wanted to hear her views on the latest media hullabaloo: Why the ubiquitous and beloved peanut butter sandwich was now a deadly lunchtime snack for some.
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