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NEWS
By Peter A. Jay | April 27, 1997
HAVRE DE GRACE -- Distressing though it may be to the more devout advocates of highway safety, people who drive cars persist in smashing them up. This tendency makes work for insurance adjusters, for lawyers and for body-shop operators like my friend Bill Denny.It also makes work for technicians, such as painters and sheet-metal specialists, who can earn good money getting the dents out. In the body-shop world, salaries of $50,000 a year are common, and $100,000 -- in places like Washington and New York -- isn't unheard of. But there's a problem.
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NEWS
By Jean Marbella, The Baltimore Sun | February 7, 2014
A father and son who were part of a criminal enterprise that sold narcotics out of a Southwest Baltimore auto body shop pleaded guilty this week to federal drug and burglary charges. Chad Paschall, 28, of Baltimore pleaded guilty on Friday to conspiring to distribute oxycodone and to commit bank burglary; his father, David Paschall, 54, of Catonsville, pleaded guilty to similar charges on Thursday, the U.S. Attorney's Office said. David Paschall operated Paschall's Auto Body Shop at 801 Desoto Road, Baltimore, where authorities said it was widely known as a marketplace for oxycodone, cocaine, heroin and other drugs.
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BUSINESS
By Christian Science Monitor | December 25, 1990
The Body Shop has 316 franchises in 37 countries. More than a dozen stores are planned for the United States this year, in addition to the 13 already operating on the East Coast, including two in Maryland, at White Marsh and at Montgomery Mall in Bethesda.Among the company's operational policies:* All staff are encouraged to participate in a community project. (New York staffers work in a hospice, for example.)* All products are from the Third World, to provide employmenand trade.* Packaging is minimal and reusable.
NEWS
August 5, 2013
While I have heard of no more Roland Park homes broken into in the middle of the day, crime continues, as does fast police response. Last week, we were invited out to dinner by friends who live on Roland Avenue.  When they picked us up, they told us that the previous night, many side mirrors on cars near them, including theirs, were pried loose and were found dangling. This was the day after they had just gotten their car back from the body shop...
NEWS
March 6, 2007
Charles E. Anderson Jr., a former Hampden auto body shop owner and businessman, died Wednesday of non-Hodgkins lymphoma at his Rodgers Forge home. He was 57. Mr. Anderson was born in Baltimore and raised in Parkville. After graduating from Parkville High School in 1967, he attended the University of Baltimore. For more than two decades, until he closed the business in the 1980s, Mr. Anderson owned and operated First Class Body Shop in Hampden. He later managed the body shop departments of Chesapeake Cadillac, Wilkins Buick and Anderson Automotive Group.
NEWS
September 21, 2002
Harold Best Sr., founder and owner of Harold's Auto Body Shop in Baltimore, died of pneumonia at Perry Point VA Medical Center in Cecil County. He was 68. Born in Clinton, N.C., Mr. Best attended Sampson High School and joined the Army in 1951. He was stationed in Germany and was honorably discharged in 1954 as a private first class. Mr. Best moved to Baltimore in 1956, worked at Bethlehem Steel for 12 years and at Jarman Pontiac for two years. In 1970, he opened his body shop at 2011 Aisquith St. He began semi-retirement in 1995 as he fought heart disease and cancer.
BUSINESS
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,Staff Writer | March 26, 1992
A scraggly-haired Englishwoman with an electric smile sat in a church auditorium in East Baltimore yesterday, surrounded by more than a dozen eager inner-city girls, rapping about how to get rid of zits.Scrub your face with some common glycerin soap, she says, then massage the skin with confectioner's sugar. The girls in Brazil swear by it, she confides.It's odd advice coming from a woman whose business is selling skin care products -- even odder when you consider that the woman is one of the richest women in Britain and one of the most famous entrepreneurs in the retail industry.
NEWS
By Daniel P. Clemens Jr. and Daniel P. Clemens Jr.,Staff writer | July 21, 1991
Barry M. Dentler is on the street and homeless.And he couldn't be happier.His last real home -- a 1982 Ford Van -- sits in storage with twoflat tires and windows broken.But Dentler, 45, will settle for anywhere other than where he's been the past eight months: the CarrollCounty Detention Center.Late Friday afternoon, Dentler was released from jail when a Circuit Court jury found him not guilty of attempted murder after a four-day trial."He's looking forward to getting out," said Public Defender Edward T. Barry, Dentler's attorney.
NEWS
By ANDREA F. SIEGEL | January 14, 2006
A white Pasadena business owner opened his auto body shop yesterday morning to find anti-black and anti-Jewish epithets as well as profanity scratched into a concrete ramp that had been poured Thursday at the side of the shop. "It was like a statement they were making. But don't make that statement around me. I don't live like that, I don't believe that," said Don Reed, 68, owner of Chesapeake Body and Frame in the 8100 block of Hog Neck Road. Anne Arundel County police are investigating the property destruction, which comes as an umbrella group is planning to hold a meeting Jan. 31 to discuss how to deal with hate crimes and other racial, religious and ethnic incidents.
NEWS
By Shirley Leung and Shirley Leung,Sun Staff Writer | January 20, 1995
Auto repair shop owners saw the future last night at an $80-a-plate dinner party inside the garage of Gesek's Auto Collision Center in Glen Burnie."The old image of a body shop as a hole in the wall is now the image of a nice, clean place where you can have dinner," said Ray Bartlett, a Crofton body shop owner, in between sips of wine.About 100 people -- the who's who of the local auto repair industry -- showed up, according to George Nyquist Jr., whose company sponsored the invitation-only affair at Gesek's, off Ritchie Highway.
NEWS
By Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | July 18, 2013
A family-run crime enterprise carried out a series of high-wire burglaries, swiping entire safes, cracking open ATMs, and cutting power and phone service to businesses before rushing in, according to federal charges unsealed Thursday. But the flashy robberies were a sideshow to the crew's prescription pill dealing at its home base in an auto shop on a dead-end Southwest Baltimore street, authorities allege. The group also is accused of distributing drugs at Lexington Market and smuggling them into a Jessup prison.
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson and Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | May 1, 2013
A two-alarm fire engulfed a building containing several auto repair shops and the artist gallery Open Space in Baltimore's Remington neighborhood Wednesday night. One firefighter was sent to the hospital for minor injuries, and firefighters were evacuated after a portion of the building collapsed. The fire was reported about 6:30 p.m. and was still active as of 9 p.m. The building, at 2720 Sisson Street, also contains 22 apartments, but no residents were reported injured. Baltimore Fire Department spokesman Roman Clark said firefighters were trying to contain the blaze to the side of the building that housed four auto body shops.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | February 23, 2012
A federal jury on Thursday convicted the last of 17 Baltimore police officers charged in a broad kickback scheme, hours after another officer who had stood trial pleaded guilty. Officer Samuel Ocasio, 36, was found guilty by the jury of conspiracy and extortion under color of official right, while Officer Kelvin Manrich, 42, pleaded guilty to the same counts earlier in the day, before jurors began deliberating. Ocasio, who is from Edgewood, and Manrich, from Middle River, face a maximum sentence of five years in prison for the conspiracy, and a maximum of 20 years in prison and a fine of $250,000 for extortion.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | February 22, 2012
Though just two Baltimore officers accused of taking kickbacks from Majestic Auto Repair are on trial this week in federal court, witnesses, prosecutors and attorneys have broadly described police behaving badly. One of the defendants falsified police reports to curry favor with a woman, and he let a drunken driver who had just crashed his car stumble into a liquor store, according to witnesses. Another officer, who previously pleaded guilty, falsely reported his personal vehicle stolen because he couldn't make the payments, according to one witness, while another officer used the Rosedale body shop for on-duty rendezvous with women, a defense attorney alleged.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | February 14, 2012
Repair shop owner Alex Moreno said he was approached in 2008 by a Baltimore police officer with an idea to help boost sales at his fledgling Rosedale business: In exchange for a cut, officers would funnel cars to the shop. Soon, Majestic Auto Repair was getting customers almost exclusively from city police - he testified Tuesday in federal court that more than 60 officers would ultimately get in on the scheme , receiving $300 for each referral. Business grew so fast that he had to expand to new lots to store all the cars; the backlog was so deep that they paid for rental cars to keep customers from becoming frustrated by the wait.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,fred.rasmussen@baltsun.com | January 5, 2010
Ruth Kutscher, who fled Nazi Germany and after settling in Baltimore later established a business selling modern furniture, accessories and gifts, died Friday of cancer at Gilchrist Hospice Care. She was 91. Ruth Lowenthal, the daughter of well known horse traders, was born and raised in Linnich, Germany, a suburb of Aachen, where she was also educated. Mrs. Kutscher was able to leave Germany and Nazi persecution with the help of Myer Strauss, the Baltimore philanthropist and president of Strauss Brothers Dry Goods Inc. and the Standard Textile Co. Inc., who had acted as her sponsor.
FEATURES
By Susan Baer and Susan Baer,Washington Bureau of The Sun | October 25, 1991
A line of customers curls through The Body Shop in Georgetown, waiting to get an autographed book from, or share a word with, Anita Roddick, the animated 48-year-old founder of this phenomenally successful chain of cosmetics shops.No one asks her whether the Rhassoul Mud Shampoo or the Banana Hair Putty is best for hard-to-manage hair. Or how the Jojoba Oil Cleanser works on combination skin. There's not a mention of the Peppermint Foot Lotion or the Japanese Washing Grains.Instead, there is talk about Brazilian rain forests and Romanian orphanages and animals that need protecting and bays that need preserving.
BUSINESS
By TOM PETERS | January 13, 1992
How's this: Best book by a CEO. Best written business book. Most spiritual and liberal business book. Most practical and conservative business book. Best business book for 20-year-olds pondering the future. The winner is: "Body & Soul," by Body Shop International founder Anita Roddick (Crown Pubs.).The first Body Shop opened on March 27, 1976, at 22 Kensington Gardens, Brighton, England. At day's end, Ms. Roddick stuffed the take, $225, into her dungaree pocket. Later that year, Ian McGlinn provided Anita and husband Gordon a desperately needed $7,000.
BUSINESS
By Dan Thanh Dang | August 10, 2008
Melia Wilkinson wasn't worried when she handed over the keys to her 2005 Toyota Sienna to the valet at the Sheraton City Center in downtown Baltimore last May. All she was thinking about was making it to a work luncheon on time. "I was running a little late, and every garage was full," said Wilkinson, 41, a marketing director and Baldwin resident. "The valet service was $20 or $30, a little expensive, but it was a hot, hot day. So I pulled in there. When I left the luncheon, I was pulled aside and told that there had been an accident, and there was some damage to the car."
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