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HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker | September 26, 2012
Lady Gaga was slammed on the internet this week after adding 25 pounds to her normally svelte figure and is fighting back by promoting people's right to a positive body self image. The popular singer started a "Body Revolution" campaign on her website Little Monsters. She posted pictures of her new fuller body clad in only a bra and panties. She encouraged her fans to post photos of their own bodies, flaws and all. Gaga is far from fat with her new figure, but not the sticks and bones often glamorized in Hollywood and on the music scene.
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NEWS
July 15, 2014
As a high school student, I am in full agreement with Alexandra Della Santina in that an astonishing number of girls spend nearly all of their time focused entirely on their appearance ( "Don't hate me because I like myself," July 8). Being able to state, "I think I'm pretty," should absolutely not inspire a pang of guilt. However, possessing the self-assurance to declare such "taboo" words will not launch you into a mindset of confidence when you spend your entire days in hallways full of girls that all share the deep desire to be a pant size 00. In order to fix that problem, we need to focus on what caused this generation of girls to focus so steadily on nothing but their appearance.
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HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn | March 28, 2012
Facebook may be focusing users too much on their body weight and image, according to a new survey from the Center for Eating Disorders at Sheppard Pratt. The mental health institution took a look at the social media outlet and found 75 percent of Facebook users were unhappy with their bodies, and 51 percent said Facebook makes them more conscious of their bodies and weight. Researchers cited comments like: “l look so fat in that photo - untag me,” “You look so skinny, I could never wear those jeans!
NEWS
Susan Reimer | February 16, 2014
In a publicity stunt that is sure to irritate 13-year-old boys and feminist scholars, Sports Illustrated and toy-maker Mattel have teamed up for the magazine's 50th anniversary swimsuit issue. Wearing an updated version of the black and white swimsuit she wore when she was introduced in 1959, Barbie appears on a giant billboard mock-up of the magazine cover and in a 4-page photo spread inside the magazine. The doll will also appear on a special edition wrap-cover of about 1,000 issues, and the only ones happy about this will be the 1,000 mothers and wives who won't have to look at three unearthly beautiful topless models who will appear on the actual front of the magazine when it hits newsstands Tuesday.
NEWS
July 15, 2014
As a high school student, I am in full agreement with Alexandra Della Santina in that an astonishing number of girls spend nearly all of their time focused entirely on their appearance ( "Don't hate me because I like myself," July 8). Being able to state, "I think I'm pretty," should absolutely not inspire a pang of guilt. However, possessing the self-assurance to declare such "taboo" words will not launch you into a mindset of confidence when you spend your entire days in hallways full of girls that all share the deep desire to be a pant size 00. In order to fix that problem, we need to focus on what caused this generation of girls to focus so steadily on nothing but their appearance.
NEWS
By MARY BETH REGAN | February 3, 2006
Hungry for More: A Keeping-It-Real Guide for Black Women on Weight and Body Image By Robyn McGee Seal Press/2005/$13.95 You probably won't find this book on the best-seller racks. Still, if it applies to you or someone you care about, hunt it down for a read. In Hungry for More, author Robyn McGee, director of women's services at California State University, tells us the story of her 49-year-old sister, Cathy, who died of heart complications after gastric bypass surgery. Cathy's death, McGee says, changed her own life and way of looking at the pressures facing African-American women.
FEATURES
By Liz Atwood | November 27, 2012
From Liz Atwood: For years we've heard about the teen and tween girls who have a negative body image. Trying to emulate the unnaturally thin models they see on TV or in magazines, they can starve themselves to death. But a new study shows that not only girls, but also teen and tween boys, can harm their health when they become too worried about their bodies. The journal Pediatrics recently published a study that shows a significant number of boys are using protein shakes and steroids to build their muscles.
FEATURES
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | June 22, 2000
LONDON - The way 15-year-old Tracey Rhodes sees it, Britain's fashion editors have a lot to answer for as they dish up glossy magazines filled with stick-thin models whose looks can often drive teen-age girls to despair. "They should stop draining our self-confidence," Rhodes says. "Get more normal people." Rhodes' message may soon be getting through to the fashion world's movers and shakers after yesterday's British government-sponsored Body Image Summit. Editors, health-care professionals, a few designers and a sprinkling of teens such as Rhodes gathered to discuss how the fashion world's insistence that extremely thin is in affects the self-esteem and health of young women.
NEWS
By Diana K. Sugg and Diana K. Sugg,SUN STAFF | February 28, 2000
They're not even 12 yet, but many of these Baltimore-area girls worry about being fat. Some have already tried diets. But yesterday, taking in artworks a few centuries old, they considered the idea that thin doesn't always mean beautiful. Their hair in ponytails, their emerald-green Girl Scout vests on, some holding lollipops, the girls quietly stared at an African female figure with large drooping breasts, a sign the woman had born children and fed them. They looked up at a Dutch painting of three nude women with plentiful tummies and hips, a mark of health and wealth.
NEWS
December 30, 2007
Mothers and daughters will discuss body image, self-esteem and the pressures on middle-school girls to conform to media images and peer pressure in a program at the Miller branch library, to be held from 6:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. Jan. 24. "Family Communication Night: How Do I Look? A Mother-Daughter Workshop on Body Image and the Pressure to be thin, `Hot,' and Perfect," will include a free dinner. The program, to be led by Lisa Morrell, adolescent counselor and founder of Health Integration, is designed for youth ages 11 to 15 and their parents.
FEATURES
By Liz Atwood | November 27, 2012
From Liz Atwood: For years we've heard about the teen and tween girls who have a negative body image. Trying to emulate the unnaturally thin models they see on TV or in magazines, they can starve themselves to death. But a new study shows that not only girls, but also teen and tween boys, can harm their health when they become too worried about their bodies. The journal Pediatrics recently published a study that shows a significant number of boys are using protein shakes and steroids to build their muscles.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker | September 26, 2012
Lady Gaga was slammed on the internet this week after adding 25 pounds to her normally svelte figure and is fighting back by promoting people's right to a positive body self image. The popular singer started a "Body Revolution" campaign on her website Little Monsters. She posted pictures of her new fuller body clad in only a bra and panties. She encouraged her fans to post photos of their own bodies, flaws and all. Gaga is far from fat with her new figure, but not the sticks and bones often glamorized in Hollywood and on the music scene.
NEWS
July 12, 2012
Great numbers of girls and women suffer from the impacts of a negative body image, including, for example, health concerns such as eating disorders. The National Institute of Mental Health, referring to the results of the National Comorbidity Study - Adolescent Supplement, cites that approximately 2.7 percent of 13-to-18-year-olds, suffer from anorexia, bulimia and binge-eating. Based on the U.S. 2010 Census, approximately 6,300 Maryland adolescent girls are estimated to suffer from eating disorders.
NEWS
The Baltimore Sun | March 29, 2012
WEATHER Today's forecast calls for mostly sunny skies and a high temperature near 63 degrees. It is expected to be mostly clear tonight, with a low temperature around 39 degrees. TRAFFIC Check our traffic map for this morning's issues as you plan your commute. FROM LAST NIGHT... U.Md. crowd enthusiastically greets Ron Paul : Republican presidential candidate Ron Paul stormed through the University of Maryland on Wednesday, delivering his trademark libertarian message of noninterventionism and hands-off government to a wildly enthusiastic crowd of students who chanted his name.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn | March 28, 2012
Facebook may be focusing users too much on their body weight and image, according to a new survey from the Center for Eating Disorders at Sheppard Pratt. The mental health institution took a look at the social media outlet and found 75 percent of Facebook users were unhappy with their bodies, and 51 percent said Facebook makes them more conscious of their bodies and weight. Researchers cited comments like: “l look so fat in that photo - untag me,” “You look so skinny, I could never wear those jeans!
EXPLORE
By Carolyn Kelemen | November 3, 2011
Director Donna L. Jacobs has once again put her dancers in the "hot seat. " For this weekend's concerts at the Baltimore Museum of Art, her Full Circle Dance Company is tackling the loaded topic of body image with the company's premiere of "B.A.R.E.," an abbreviation for "Bodies, Attitudes, Reflections, Exposed. " As with its past themed projects touching on faith, motherhood, race, and even the fear of the unknown, this Baltimore-based company has invited the community to take part in its artistic exploration.
NEWS
February 24, 2010
Yes, women do need more healthy role models for body image, but why should we even be comparing the scale numbers anyway ("Real athletes, real bodies," Feb. 21)? What good does it do to know an athlete's weight, when clearly that weight is significantly increased by hard-earned lean muscle, not by the higher body fat percentages that raise the average American woman's weight? A pound and a pound are not always equal. To say that an Olympic athlete, who is the epitome of strength and health, weighs the same as the average American female (who is most likely shorter, much less muscular, and by far less active)
NEWS
February 19, 2006
Bodiography, a contemporary ballet company dedicated to the awareness of eating disorders, will give a performance for the finale of McDaniel College's National Eating Disorder Awareness Week at 7:30 p.m. Saturday in the Carroll Arts Center, 91 W. Main St., Westminster. The troupe will dance to the music of the Dave Matthews Band, Pearl Jam and Smashing Pumpkins, and will preview some never-before-seen pieces. Tickets are free for McDaniel College students and faculty, $5 for general admission.
NEWS
February 24, 2010
Yes, women do need more healthy role models for body image, but why should we even be comparing the scale numbers anyway ("Real athletes, real bodies," Feb. 21)? What good does it do to know an athlete's weight, when clearly that weight is significantly increased by hard-earned lean muscle, not by the higher body fat percentages that raise the average American woman's weight? A pound and a pound are not always equal. To say that an Olympic athlete, who is the epitome of strength and health, weighs the same as the average American female (who is most likely shorter, much less muscular, and by far less active)
NEWS
By Susan Reimer and Susan Reimer,susan.reimer@baltsun.com | January 11, 2010
I haven't worn anything sleeveless since 1999, and two years ago my daughter told me, politely but firmly, that it was no longer appropriate for me to wear anything above the knee, so you can imagine how I feel about full-body scans in airports. And, although I do not have a dog, I am friends with many in my neighborhood, and I know where they put their noses when they are glad to see you. I can only imagine how things will go with a body-sniffing dog when he has his game face on. The attempt by a Nigerian kid to blow up a U.S. airplane on Christmas Day has made me worry deeply about my safety and well-being, but not in the way you might think.
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