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Body Fluids

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NEWS
By Ellen Creager and Ellen Creager,Knight Ridder/Tribune | November 21, 1999
If you need persuading to wash your hands and hound your children to do the same, this is it: Nearly half of playground equipment surfaces and a quarter of public restroom surfaces are contaminated with body fluids -- blood, urine, mucus, saliva or sweat.That's the result of a University of Arizona test of 800 public surfaces over a three-month period.Tests took place in Tucson, Chicago and San Francisco. Researchers took samples at day-care centers, offices, stores, banks, malls, copy centers, health clubs, playgrounds, restaurants, theaters and doctors' offices.
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NEWS
October 6, 2014
Your editorial on the Ebola virus' recent appearance in Texas perfectly expressed my fears and concerns regarding the outbreak ( "Ebola hits home," Oct. 2). I would add one more point that should be made: When medical officials say Ebola can only be spread via body fluids, they usually cite blood, vomit, urine and diarrhea. However, bodily fluids also include sweat and saliva, both of which are secreted daily in the most mundane ways. I strongly urge people in Dallas, where I was recently a graduate student at Southern Methodist University, to stock up on bleach-based cleansers and to refrain from unnecessarily touching their faces, especially if their hands have been in contact with objects commonly carried around in crowded public spaces, like laptops and cellphones.
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FEATURES
By Colleen Pierre, R.D. and Colleen Pierre, R.D.,Contributing Writer | August 25, 1992
Water weight is women's weight-loss Waterloo.Your scale might tell you that you've gained two pounds, when you've really lost one pound of fat.That's because, despite incredible technological advances, a scale is not sophisticated enough to differentiate what it's weighing.When you step on the scale, it weighs your bones, muscles, brains, vital organs, blood and other body fluids. It also weighs food being digested, and the water and iced tea you just drank, but haven't processed yet. And it weighs stored body fat, which is what you're trying to lose.
NEWS
By Jonathan Bor and Michael Dresser and Jonathan Bor and Michael Dresser,SUN STAFF | March 17, 2000
Researchers at the Johns Hopkins Oncology Center have developed a new way of detecting cancers that requires patients to provide only a urine, saliva or sputum sample. Dr. David Sidransky said the test would allow doctors to find early cancers that are hard to detect with conventional methods such as biopsies. Labs would screen body fluids for genetic changes that are associated with cancer. The tests would be commercially available within the next five years, he said. "We now have an entirely new method of cancer detection that can be used when cancers are still amenable to early detection and cure," said Sidransky, a specialist in head and neck cancers.
FEATURES
By Joe Graedon and Dr. Teresa Graedon and Joe Graedon and Dr. Teresa Graedon,King Features Syndicate | October 18, 1994
Q: My wife and I have had an argument for over a year about the pill called Tagamet, which we both take. She claims Tagamet will become available at all drugstores without prescription some time this year.While she hardly reads anything and I read everything, I have never heard of such a thing. A bet on a trip to Europe hinges on your answer. Of course, both of us expect to win, but needless to say, if I lose I will never hear the end of it.A: For somebody who doesn't read much, your wife is quite well-informed.
NEWS
July 20, 1995
A county police officer put a bag over a Linthicum woman's head Monday night to keep her from spitting on him after he arrested her on assault and battery charges, officials said.Northern District Officer Richard Schinzel was called to a house in the 6800 block of Baltimore-Annapolis Boulevard about 11:40 p.m. to investigate a domestic assault. Kimberly A. Kuhn, who lives in the house, told Officer Schinzel her adult daughter was on drugs and had attacked a child there, police said. The patrolman arrested Ms. Kuhn's daughter after she refused to leave, police said.
NEWS
October 6, 2014
Your editorial on the Ebola virus' recent appearance in Texas perfectly expressed my fears and concerns regarding the outbreak ( "Ebola hits home," Oct. 2). I would add one more point that should be made: When medical officials say Ebola can only be spread via body fluids, they usually cite blood, vomit, urine and diarrhea. However, bodily fluids also include sweat and saliva, both of which are secreted daily in the most mundane ways. I strongly urge people in Dallas, where I was recently a graduate student at Southern Methodist University, to stock up on bleach-based cleansers and to refrain from unnecessarily touching their faces, especially if their hands have been in contact with objects commonly carried around in crowded public spaces, like laptops and cellphones.
FEATURES
By Dr. Simeon Margolis | April 23, 1991
Q: I was referred by my family doctor to a cardiologist who recommended an echocardiogram. Could you tell me the purpose of this procedure and how it is done?A: An echocardiogram is the image produced by applying techniques using ultrasound to the heart.Ultrasonography uses an external device to transmit brief pulses of high-frequency sound into the body. The sound wave signals echoed back from body tissues are picked up by the same device and converted to a picture of the anatomical features on the chest, but for some diagnostic purposes may be positioned inside the esophagus or food tube using a gastroscope.
NEWS
By Jonathan Bor and Michael Dresser and Jonathan Bor and Michael Dresser,SUN STAFF | March 17, 2000
Researchers at the Johns Hopkins Oncology Center have developed a new way of detecting cancers that requires patients to provide only a urine, saliva or sputum sample. Dr. David Sidransky said the test would allow doctors to find early cancers that are hard to detect with conventional methods such as biopsies. Labs would screen body fluids for genetic changes that are associated with cancer. The tests would be commercially available within the next five years, he said. "We now have an entirely new method of cancer detection that can be used when cancers are still amenable to early detection and cure," said Sidransky, a specialist in head and neck cancers.
FEATURES
By Dr. Modena Wilson and Dr. Alain Joffe and Dr. Modena Wilson and Dr. Alain Joffe,Special to The Sun | June 6, 1995
Q: In the future, could the AIDS virus become airborne?A: Under almost all circumstances, the answer is no. Unlike some other viruses, the AIDS virus (otherwise known as the Human Immunodeficiency Virus -- HIV) is extremely fragile.It cannot live outside the body for very long and is sensitive to heat and drying. That is why the two major methods of transmission for HIV remain sexual intercourse and the sharing of needles. Both of these methods allow for the passage of body fluids (which contain the virus)
NEWS
By Ellen Creager and Ellen Creager,Knight Ridder/Tribune | November 21, 1999
If you need persuading to wash your hands and hound your children to do the same, this is it: Nearly half of playground equipment surfaces and a quarter of public restroom surfaces are contaminated with body fluids -- blood, urine, mucus, saliva or sweat.That's the result of a University of Arizona test of 800 public surfaces over a three-month period.Tests took place in Tucson, Chicago and San Francisco. Researchers took samples at day-care centers, offices, stores, banks, malls, copy centers, health clubs, playgrounds, restaurants, theaters and doctors' offices.
NEWS
July 20, 1995
A county police officer put a bag over a Linthicum woman's head Monday night to keep her from spitting on him after he arrested her on assault and battery charges, officials said.Northern District Officer Richard Schinzel was called to a house in the 6800 block of Baltimore-Annapolis Boulevard about 11:40 p.m. to investigate a domestic assault. Kimberly A. Kuhn, who lives in the house, told Officer Schinzel her adult daughter was on drugs and had attacked a child there, police said. The patrolman arrested Ms. Kuhn's daughter after she refused to leave, police said.
FEATURES
By Joe Graedon and Dr. Teresa Graedon and Joe Graedon and Dr. Teresa Graedon,King Features Syndicate | October 18, 1994
Q: My wife and I have had an argument for over a year about the pill called Tagamet, which we both take. She claims Tagamet will become available at all drugstores without prescription some time this year.While she hardly reads anything and I read everything, I have never heard of such a thing. A bet on a trip to Europe hinges on your answer. Of course, both of us expect to win, but needless to say, if I lose I will never hear the end of it.A: For somebody who doesn't read much, your wife is quite well-informed.
FEATURES
By Colleen Pierre, R.D. and Colleen Pierre, R.D.,Contributing Writer | August 25, 1992
Water weight is women's weight-loss Waterloo.Your scale might tell you that you've gained two pounds, when you've really lost one pound of fat.That's because, despite incredible technological advances, a scale is not sophisticated enough to differentiate what it's weighing.When you step on the scale, it weighs your bones, muscles, brains, vital organs, blood and other body fluids. It also weighs food being digested, and the water and iced tea you just drank, but haven't processed yet. And it weighs stored body fat, which is what you're trying to lose.
FEATURES
By Dr. Simeon Margolis | April 23, 1991
Q: I was referred by my family doctor to a cardiologist who recommended an echocardiogram. Could you tell me the purpose of this procedure and how it is done?A: An echocardiogram is the image produced by applying techniques using ultrasound to the heart.Ultrasonography uses an external device to transmit brief pulses of high-frequency sound into the body. The sound wave signals echoed back from body tissues are picked up by the same device and converted to a picture of the anatomical features on the chest, but for some diagnostic purposes may be positioned inside the esophagus or food tube using a gastroscope.
FEATURES
By Dr. Simeon Margolis | March 19, 1991
Q: I have heard that there is a lot of sodium or salt in tap water. Is that true? How much sodium is in a glass of water? I would also like to know how potassium works in the body and what foods are high in potassium.A: The sodium content of water depends somewhat on its source. For example, well water may contain more sodium than the surface water supplying Baltimore City and Baltimore County, where the amount of sodium in tap water is quite low -- approximately 2 milligrams per cup of water.
NEWS
By M. Dion Thompson and M. Dion Thompson,Annapolis Bureau of The Sun | February 16, 1991
ANNAPOLIS -- A Senate committee approved yesterday a bill allowing health-care workers to request AIDS tests for patients they feel may have accidentally infected them, although the patient can refuse.But the Economic and Environmental Affairs Committee killed another bill requiring the testing of every patient and medical worker involved in a situation where an exposure of blood or body fluids has occurred.The committee also killed a bill that would have required that bodies transported to mortuaries be labeled for infectious diseases.
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