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By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,Pop Music Critic | December 14, 1992
Does the name Body Count ring a bell?It should. A few months ago, this L.A.-based thrash act was the most notorious band in rock and roll. Thanks to "Cop Killer," the last song on Body Count's self-titled debut album, the group was condemned by law enforcement associations, denounced by Vice President Dan Quayle and reviled by actor Charlton Heston.By mid-summer, sentiment was running so high that complaints over "Cop Killer" dominated the annual stockholders meeting at Time/Warner, the media conglomerate distributing the Body Count album.
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NEWS
May 30, 2012
Your list of the names of U.S. soldiers who have died in Afghanistan since last Memorial Day on Monday's editorial page was nice, but it conveniently left out the body count ("U.S. fallen in Afghanistan," May 28). Since 2009, when Barack Obama became president, 1,355 U.S. soldiers have died in the Afghan war. Yet the mainstream media, including The Sun, is not counting. Of course, whenGeorge W. Bushwas president, we got the body count every day. Where is the fairness in The Sun's approach?
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FEATURES
By J. D. Considine and J. D. Considine,Pop Music Critic | July 29, 1992
Rap star Ice-T announced yesterday that he would delete the controversial track "Cop Killer" from his speed-metal album "Body Count." But the rapper insisted this withdrawal was not in response to police protests against his song, but due to death threats made against employees at Warner Bros. Records, the album's manufacturer. Ice-T blamed those threats on police officers."At the moment the cops are in a criminal mode," he said at press conference in Los Angeles yesterday. "They've raised a lot of death threats against Warner Brothers Records."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Andrew Conrad, aconrad@tribune.com | October 30, 2011
Things have started getting pretty heavy in "The Walking Dead," not that it was a game of Candy Land before this week's episode, titled "Save the Last One" (referring to a bullet, in case the zombies catch you, so you can go out on your own terms and not theirs!) If you haven't watched the episode yet, you might not want to read any further because I'm about to discuss some fairly significant plot developments. Lori Grimes, a.k.a Debbie Downer , strongly considered letting her firstborn son perish so he could stop enduring the endless nightmare, and Shane Walsh took a serious heel turn , capping poor, fat Otis and letting him get devoured by walkers.
NEWS
May 30, 2012
Your list of the names of U.S. soldiers who have died in Afghanistan since last Memorial Day on Monday's editorial page was nice, but it conveniently left out the body count ("U.S. fallen in Afghanistan," May 28). Since 2009, when Barack Obama became president, 1,355 U.S. soldiers have died in the Afghan war. Yet the mainstream media, including The Sun, is not counting. Of course, whenGeorge W. Bushwas president, we got the body count every day. Where is the fairness in The Sun's approach?
FEATURES
By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,Pop Music Critic | June 30, 1992
Until recently, most of us assumed that the greatest menace to police in this country was the rising level of gunplay on our streets. But now, we know better. Thanks to a loose coalition of politicians and law enforcement fraternities, we now realize that the real threat to American law enforcement comes not from pistol-packing criminals, but from rhyme-slinging recording artists.Imagine our relief.What prompted this revelation was "Cop Killer," a song written and performed by Ice-T and his thrash band, Body Count.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | March 2, 1997
Lawyers preparing for the Oklahoma City bombing trial and other experts following the case are concerned about the potential effect on the jury of a newspaper report that defendant Timothy J. McVeigh told his lawyers that he had driven the truck used in the bombing and that he had decided on a daytime attack to ensure a "body count."The article, published yesterday in the Dallas Morning News, first appeared on the newspaper's World Wide Web page Friday, the same day that questionnaires mailed two weeks ago to hundreds of prospective jurors were due at the U.S. District Court in Denver.
FEATURES
By Los Angeles Times | October 4, 1990
HOLLYWOOD -- Director Paul Mazursky may have lined u Woody Allen and Bette Midler as the leads in "Scenes From a Mall," but it sounds like the Stamford (Conn.) Town Center, where most of the filming will take place, is the real star.The dramatic comedy, revolving around the 16th anniversary of a lawyer and his psychologist wife, takes place in one day at the mall.Co-producer and production designer Pato Guzman, Mazursky's longtime collaborator, selected the Stamford Town Center from "over 100" possibilities around the United States for its multilevel "futuristic look," including 900,000 square feet of mirrored escalators, atriums and 132 shops.
NEWS
By Jonathan Turley | July 23, 2004
ATTORNEY GENERAL John Ashcroft recently went to Congress to herald another record year of fighting terrorism, showcasing numbers showing 310 defendants charged as evidence that "the Patriot Act is al-Qaida's worst nightmare." Few would argue about the nightmare part, but it is hard to see al-Qaida losing much sleep: To a large degree, Mr. Ashcroft has used antiterrorism laws against citizens with no ties to al-Qaida or even terrorism. With many in Congress opposed to renewing parts of the USA Patriot Act, the 29-page report by Mr. Ashcroft attempts to show "a mountain of evidence that the Patriot Act continues to save lives," but it omits critical facts that seriously undermine that claim.
NEWS
By Troy McCullough and Troy McCullough,Sun Columnist | April 22, 2007
On the Internet, there is little time for grief. In an arena that feeds on a steady diet of confrontation, quiet reflection is naturally hard to come by, but that doesn't make it any less jarring in the face of a tragic story like the events that unfolded last week at Virginia Tech. As news of the shootings broke, few blogs or message boards found cause to pause too long for the dead. Instead, many moved startlingly fast to axe-grinding, finger-pointing and name-calling, often in a matter of minutes after hearing the news.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Sragow, The Baltimore Sun | June 3, 2011
When Karen Rose enrolled at the University of Maryland, the one thing she knew was that she "didn't want to dissect. " It's a funny confession for an author who has written a 494-page novel about a killer who tortures victims with a filleting knife. Rose sees the humor in it. Whenever her two daughters would tell her about some tiny creature they'd trained a scalpel on at school, she'd try to change the subject. They'd say, "Mom — you're the one who asked how many bodies you could stick in a freezer.
NEWS
By Troy McCullough and Troy McCullough,Sun Columnist | April 22, 2007
On the Internet, there is little time for grief. In an arena that feeds on a steady diet of confrontation, quiet reflection is naturally hard to come by, but that doesn't make it any less jarring in the face of a tragic story like the events that unfolded last week at Virginia Tech. As news of the shootings broke, few blogs or message boards found cause to pause too long for the dead. Instead, many moved startlingly fast to axe-grinding, finger-pointing and name-calling, often in a matter of minutes after hearing the news.
NEWS
By DAN RODRICKS | December 30, 2005
A clock ticks in Baltimore, and I don't mean the one in Oriole Park. It's the homicide clock. It's not something you can look up and see, but something you feel and hear - part of Baltimore's biorhythm - and every year at this time, the ticks get louder, the pulse grows stronger, and anyone who still cares about this stupid waste of life gets a headache. Even if you'd rather not think about it, you can't help but sense the body count building. It's as if you can feel the weight of it. It's not as heavy as it was 10 years ago. But it's still heavy.
NEWS
By SUSANNAH ROSENBLATT AND JAMES RAINEY and SUSANNAH ROSENBLATT AND JAMES RAINEY,LOS ANGELES TIMES | September 28, 2005
BATON ROUGE, La. -- Maj. Ed Bush recalled standing in the bed of a pickup truck - armed only with a megaphone and scant information - in the days after Hurricane Katrina struck, struggling to help the crowd outside the Louisiana Superdome separate fact from fiction. The National Guard spokesman's accounts of rescue efforts, water supplies and first aid all but disappeared amid the rumor mill at New Orleans' main evacuation shelter. Then the news media recycled and amplified many of the unverified reports.
NEWS
January 27, 2005
APRIL MAY BE the cruelest month, but January has ushered in the deadliest start of a new year in Baltimore since 1999. The month isn't yet over and the city has recorded 27 murders - five of them, incredibly, in one day. Four of them allegedly were the handiwork of a pair of stickup men who were arrested Thursday. Good police work, but the arrests can't begin to answer Baltimore's climbing murder rate. Drug intelligence is the key to breaking up the illicit narcotics trade bloodying our streets.
NEWS
By Jonathan Turley | July 23, 2004
ATTORNEY GENERAL John Ashcroft recently went to Congress to herald another record year of fighting terrorism, showcasing numbers showing 310 defendants charged as evidence that "the Patriot Act is al-Qaida's worst nightmare." Few would argue about the nightmare part, but it is hard to see al-Qaida losing much sleep: To a large degree, Mr. Ashcroft has used antiterrorism laws against citizens with no ties to al-Qaida or even terrorism. With many in Congress opposed to renewing parts of the USA Patriot Act, the 29-page report by Mr. Ashcroft attempts to show "a mountain of evidence that the Patriot Act continues to save lives," but it omits critical facts that seriously undermine that claim.
NEWS
By GREGORY P. KANE | September 11, 1991
When we search for the reasons 6-year-old Tiffany Smith wascaught in the crossfire that snuffed out her life, we should not rush to judgment and automatically blame ''drug dealers.'' That was the mistake made in the shooting death last year of Jay Bias Jr. When the facts came out, it transpired that Mr. Bias died as the result of an argument he did everything he could to avoid.The only fact we know in the case of Tiffany Smith is that she died as the result of an argument she had no part in. The argument may have been about drugs.
NEWS
By DAN RODRICKS | December 30, 2005
A clock ticks in Baltimore, and I don't mean the one in Oriole Park. It's the homicide clock. It's not something you can look up and see, but something you feel and hear - part of Baltimore's biorhythm - and every year at this time, the ticks get louder, the pulse grows stronger, and anyone who still cares about this stupid waste of life gets a headache. Even if you'd rather not think about it, you can't help but sense the body count building. It's as if you can feel the weight of it. It's not as heavy as it was 10 years ago. But it's still heavy.
NEWS
By DAN RODRICKS | February 5, 2004
I WOKE UP the other day to discover that everyone in my country was appalled and disgusted by something they saw on national television. Imagine that! This time it was a Super Bowl halftime show, with Justin Timberlake ripping off some of Janet Jackson's S&M costume to reveal her right breast for two seconds at the end of their performance of the song "Rock Your Body." The chairman of the Federal Communications Commission, apparently shocked that Up With People didn't headline the Super Bowl halftime show, called the Timberlake-Jackson ripoff "classless, crass and deplorable."
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | December 2, 2003
SAMARRA, Iraq - U.S. commanders vowed yesterday that the killing of as many as 54 insurgents in this central Iraqi town would serve as a lesson to those fighting the United States, but Iraqis disputed the death toll and said anger against the United States would only rise. Accounts of a three-hour battle fought in the alleys and streets of Samarra on Sunday diverged radically, with Iraqis claiming only eight people had been killed, several of them civilians. At the morgue, Adnan Sahib Dafar, 52, an ambulance driver, pointed to a dead woman on a steel tray.
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