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NEWS
By Randi Henderson | January 17, 1991
An Ellicott City company with a contract to produce body bags has been besieged by calls from the press, ever since several news reports named the C. R. Daniels Co. as a maker of what the Department of Defense calls "pouches for human remains.""We have had calls from all of the networks, from all kinds of publications," said Hugh Blaha, vice president of the company. "We will not discuss any defense contract that we have."The company, which makes canvas bags, received a $294,015 contract from the Defense Department last month.
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NEWS
The Baltimore Sun | March 15, 2014
An Anne Arundel County man was arrested Friday after police said he threatened violence against a county councilman and the presiding officers of the General Assembly - an incident allegedly touched off by his outrage over the construction of a drainage pond. Paul David Grimm, 58, of 100 block of Tarks Lane in Severna Park, was charged with three counts of threatening a public official. Police said the threats came after Councilman Dick Ladd visited Grimm's neighborhood to discuss his concerns about the project in his community.
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NEWS
By Scott Shane and Scott Shane,SUN STAFF | September 21, 2000
Amid the upbeat television coverage of gold-medal swimmers and gymnasts, the advertisement seems grim, almost shocking: young people piling 1,200 body bags outside a tobacco giant's Manhattan headquarters to demonstrate the daily death toll of smoking in America. A young man with a bullhorn shouts up to gray-suited executives who peer warily from their windows several stories above. "We're gonna leave these here," he says, "so you can see what 1,200 people actually look like!" The edgy anti-smoking ad airing on NBC during the Olympics is most Americans' first encounter with the work of the American Legacy Foundation, which will get $1.5 billion over the next five years from the national tobacco settlement to persuade teen-agers not to smoke.
NEWS
By Justin George, The Baltimore Sun | July 28, 2013
One in a series of occasional articles. Hearses enter the six-story building in West Baltimore through garage doors that snap open and shut quickly, to keep business discreet. Researchers who work across from the $43 million Forensic Medical Center catch glimpses of the drop-offs. They call the state-of-the-art center on the edge of the University of Maryland BioPark "the Bat Cave. " The morgue - shrouded in myth, misrepresented on screen - typically is portrayed as a dark, dank basement with sexy forensic investigators peering into microscopes, eccentric doctors weighing body parts, and officials pulling open refrigerated drawers, unzipping body bags and asking spouses: "Is this your husband?"
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | May 4, 2010
A Prince George's County funeral home has lost its license after a state inspector discovered what appeared to be 40 bodies intended for cremation haphazardly piled in body bags stacked in its garage. The Maryland State Board of Morticians and Funeral Directors summarily suspended the license of the Chambers Funeral Home & Crematorium in Riverdale on Monday. The emergency suspension affects two morticians as well as their business license. "I saw the photos," said Hari P. Close, the state funeral board's president.
NEWS
By Justin George, The Baltimore Sun | July 28, 2013
One in a series of occasional articles. Hearses enter the six-story building in West Baltimore through garage doors that snap open and shut quickly, to keep business discreet. Researchers who work across from the $43 million Forensic Medical Center catch glimpses of the drop-offs. They call the state-of-the-art center on the edge of the University of Maryland BioPark "the Bat Cave. " The morgue - shrouded in myth, misrepresented on screen - typically is portrayed as a dark, dank basement with sexy forensic investigators peering into microscopes, eccentric doctors weighing body parts, and officials pulling open refrigerated drawers, unzipping body bags and asking spouses: "Is this your husband?"
NEWS
April 30, 1991
America anguished during the Persian Gulf crisis over the possibility that many of its men and women would return home from that conflict in body bags. Yet, public debate rarely focuses on the fact that every day, in this country, almost 65 Americans get put in body bags -- casualties of the crisis in our streets.A new FBI report documents a staggering degree of carnage: In 1990, the FBI found, approximately 23,600 Americans were murdered; more than 100,000 American women were raped, 642,000 Americans were robbed and more than 1 million were victims of aggravated assault.
NEWS
The Baltimore Sun | March 15, 2014
An Anne Arundel County man was arrested Friday after police said he threatened violence against a county councilman and the presiding officers of the General Assembly - an incident allegedly touched off by his outrage over the construction of a drainage pond. Paul David Grimm, 58, of 100 block of Tarks Lane in Severna Park, was charged with three counts of threatening a public official. Police said the threats came after Councilman Dick Ladd visited Grimm's neighborhood to discuss his concerns about the project in his community.
NEWS
By Patricia Montley | January 31, 2003
BODY BAGS. Every mother's nightmare. The headlines may be rife with "mass destruction," "nuclear power," "terrorist threat." But it's body bags - those sickening caricatures of placentas - that haunt the dreams of mothers. John Wayne doesn't work here anymore. We've seen Jon Voight come home in howling pieces and Private Ryan saved at horrifying price. We've seen the faces of Afghan mothers whose children were collateral damage. And we know, despite the raging rhetoric, that the flow of oil is not as vital as the flow of mother's milk - that white, warm stream of comfort that's always there, deep in our collective unconscious, imbedded in myth and memory.
SPORTS
By Vito Stellino and Vito Stellino,Staff Writer | September 19, 1993
PHILADELPHIA -- The Philadelphia Eagles no longer talk about body bags and bounties."That was the last regime," coach Rich Kotite said last week. "I don't talk about body bags and things like that. I think that's ridiculous."Kotite, of course, doesn't have to identify the last regime.He was talking about Buddy Ryan, who has been gone from Philadelphia for three years, but still casts a large shadow over the franchise.When the wounded Washington Redskins play the Eagles at Veterans Stadium today, it will bring memories of the last time they went there without Mark Rypien as their starting quarterback.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | May 4, 2010
A Prince George's County funeral home has lost its license after a state inspector discovered what appeared to be 40 bodies intended for cremation haphazardly piled in body bags stacked in its garage. The Maryland State Board of Morticians and Funeral Directors summarily suspended the license of the Chambers Funeral Home & Crematorium in Riverdale on Monday. The emergency suspension affects two morticians as well as their business license. "I saw the photos," said Hari P. Close, the state funeral board's president.
NEWS
By Patricia Montley | January 31, 2003
BODY BAGS. Every mother's nightmare. The headlines may be rife with "mass destruction," "nuclear power," "terrorist threat." But it's body bags - those sickening caricatures of placentas - that haunt the dreams of mothers. John Wayne doesn't work here anymore. We've seen Jon Voight come home in howling pieces and Private Ryan saved at horrifying price. We've seen the faces of Afghan mothers whose children were collateral damage. And we know, despite the raging rhetoric, that the flow of oil is not as vital as the flow of mother's milk - that white, warm stream of comfort that's always there, deep in our collective unconscious, imbedded in myth and memory.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann and Peter Hermann,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | June 20, 2002
JERUSALEM - With news photographers jostling for the best angle to photograph the line of body bags at Tuesday morning's deadly suicide bombing, the Israeli police finally had to step in and take action. Instead of forcing the press back, police tore down a temporary tent set up by emergency crews to shield against the sun, which was blocking the scene, and ordered religious workers attending to the dead to leave the area to avoid getting in the way. As a result, news photographers had a clear view of the gruesome aftermath of Jerusalem's deadliest bombing attack in six years, and of Prime Minister Ariel Sharon as he toured the carnage and walked along the line of bodies.
NEWS
By Scott Shane and Scott Shane,SUN STAFF | September 21, 2000
Amid the upbeat television coverage of gold-medal swimmers and gymnasts, the advertisement seems grim, almost shocking: young people piling 1,200 body bags outside a tobacco giant's Manhattan headquarters to demonstrate the daily death toll of smoking in America. A young man with a bullhorn shouts up to gray-suited executives who peer warily from their windows several stories above. "We're gonna leave these here," he says, "so you can see what 1,200 people actually look like!" The edgy anti-smoking ad airing on NBC during the Olympics is most Americans' first encounter with the work of the American Legacy Foundation, which will get $1.5 billion over the next five years from the national tobacco settlement to persuade teen-agers not to smoke.
NEWS
By Albany Times Union | November 18, 1994
ALBANY, N.Y. -- Everyone thought 83-year-old Mildred C. Clarke was dead.After city rescue squad members examined her, a coroner pronounced her dead. She was zipped into a body bag and shipped to the morgue at Albany Medical Center Hospital. There she was kept in a cooler at 40 degrees for about 90 minutes.But when funeral home attendants came to pick up her body, a morgue attendant who slid her out of the cooler was startled to find that Ms. Clarke was very much alive.Ms. Clarke was recovering Wednesday night at the hospital.
SPORTS
By Vito Stellino and Vito Stellino,Staff Writer | September 19, 1993
PHILADELPHIA -- The Philadelphia Eagles no longer talk about body bags and bounties."That was the last regime," coach Rich Kotite said last week. "I don't talk about body bags and things like that. I think that's ridiculous."Kotite, of course, doesn't have to identify the last regime.He was talking about Buddy Ryan, who has been gone from Philadelphia for three years, but still casts a large shadow over the franchise.When the wounded Washington Redskins play the Eagles at Veterans Stadium today, it will bring memories of the last time they went there without Mark Rypien as their starting quarterback.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann and Peter Hermann,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | June 20, 2002
JERUSALEM - With news photographers jostling for the best angle to photograph the line of body bags at Tuesday morning's deadly suicide bombing, the Israeli police finally had to step in and take action. Instead of forcing the press back, police tore down a temporary tent set up by emergency crews to shield against the sun, which was blocking the scene, and ordered religious workers attending to the dead to leave the area to avoid getting in the way. As a result, news photographers had a clear view of the gruesome aftermath of Jerusalem's deadliest bombing attack in six years, and of Prime Minister Ariel Sharon as he toured the carnage and walked along the line of bodies.
NEWS
By Robert Ruby and Robert Ruby,Sun Staff Correspondent | January 22, 1991
ABOARD THE USS NICHOLAS -- Of all the early events of the war, none has been more sobering or more strongly felt for the crew of the Nicholas than the capture of Iraqi prisoners of war.Officers aboard the guided missile frigate say that nothing has brought out as much sympathy as seeing Iraqi prisoners face to face, or caused as much unease as the recognition that Americans captured by Iraq are as utterly powerless as the Iraqis who were detained on the...
NEWS
May 19, 1993
A search through this newspaper's computerized librar reveals the use of the word "murder" in the paper 5,382 times since September 1990 (when the system went on line.) That's at least six times every day. (By comparison, the word "Schaefer" showed up 4,397 and "Schmoke" 2,379). Add to that all the TV newscasts, the docudramas and movies which describe, depict and dissect, day in, day out, humankind's brutalities against one another and the results can be, understandably, quite numbing.But slow the staccato-paced action -- in fact, stop it. And don't just describe the gore, but show it -- in the low-tech, yet enduring form of still photography -- and outrage will be heard far and wide.
NEWS
April 30, 1991
America anguished during the Persian Gulf crisis over the possibility that many of its men and women would return home from that conflict in body bags. Yet, public debate rarely focuses on the fact that every day, in this country, almost 65 Americans get put in body bags -- casualties of the crisis in our streets.A new FBI report documents a staggering degree of carnage: In 1990, the FBI found, approximately 23,600 Americans were murdered; more than 100,000 American women were raped, 642,000 Americans were robbed and more than 1 million were victims of aggravated assault.
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