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NEWS
December 9, 1994
At the behest of the city police union, the Baltimore City Council is considering a bill to ban the sale and ownership of bulletproof vests. The rationale for the measure is extremely weak.The issue arose last month when police officers noticed a billboard on Reisterstown Road advertising a mail-order company, Second Chance Safety, and its line of bulletproof vests. The officers complained that the ad was directed at drug dealers.Company owner Robert Abrams denied the charge, citing inquiries from lawyers, abortion doctors and pizza delivery workers about buying these protective coverings.
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NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | June 18, 2014
Dr. James Ellicott Tyson Hopkins, a retired thoracic surgeon and decorated World War II veteran who drew on his battlefield experience to advocate for the use of body armor, died of heart failure Monday at his home near Bel Air. He was 99. He served during World War II with a fabled unit, Merrill's Marauders, behind enemy lines in Burma. Born on his family's farm near Highland in Howard County, he was a descendant of Johns Hopkins, the Quaker philanthropist who founded the Baltimore hospital and university.
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NEWS
By Richard Irwin and Richard Irwin,Sun reporter | September 8, 2006
A Baltimore police officer assigned to a robbery-prevention detail in Patterson Park was shot last night - but apparently saved from serious injury by his protective body armor - in a confrontation with an unknown assailant near Eastern Avenue, police said. Officer Robert G. Cirello, a nearly four-year member of the police force assigned to the Southeastern District's operations unit, was patrolling in uniform south of the park's landmark pagoda about 10 p.m. when he apparently confronted at least one suspicious male, police said.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Andrew Conrad, aconrad@patuxent.com | March 3, 2013
Good God this show is depressing. It's fun to look at dead bodies and blood and guts a little bit, but then you throw in all the nihilistic conversation and abandoned long distance hikers and by the end of the episode you're just like ._. This episode was kind of a departure from the norm because it didn't really address the Woodbury-Prison storyline at all, and it really only featured four characters: Rick, Carl, Michonne and ... Morgan!...
NEWS
By Richard Irwin and Richard Irwin,Sun Staff Writer | April 21, 1995
A city police officer's body armor was credited with preventing his death, or serious injury, when he was shot yesterday afternoon while seated in his patrol car in West Baltimore.Officer John Andrezywski, 25, was providing backup during a sweep by the Western District drug unit in the 1600 block of Presbury St. around 2:30 p.m. when a high velocity, small caliber bullet shattered his patrol car's windshield.Officer Andrezywski, who has been on the force for seven months, drove back to the Western District station and reported the incident to superiors, then went home after his shift ended at 4 p.m.Lt.
NEWS
By Jeff Barker and Jeff Barker,SUN STAFF | March 27, 2001
Carroll County legislators have introduced a bill providing new legal protection to business owners in cases such as one this month in which two brothers are under investigation in the fatal shooting of a man during what police said was an attempted burglary of their Glyndon concrete business. The measure would shield owners from civil lawsuits for deadly force against someone "who unlawfully and forcefully enters" their business. It would not affect criminal prosecutions. Del. Carmen Amedori, a Carroll Republican, said yesterday the bill is in response to an incident in which a Baltimore man was killed and two Baltimore County men were wounded at Back River Supply Inc. Police said Matthew J. Geckle and Dominic A. Geckle were guarding the plant with shotguns after previous burglaries.
NEWS
By Tim Craig and Tim Craig,SUN STAFF | July 26, 2000
Baltimore police Sgt. Mike Dunn was among the first believers. On a dreary April evening 21 years ago, Dunn pulled over a van for what he thought was a routine traffic stop on South Hanover Street. What he found was a driver pointing a revolver directly at him. Boom. Boom. Boom. One bullet hit him in the left arm, another lodged in his leg. A third slammed into his chest. Dunn fell to the ground, wounded but alive - thanks to the synthetic body armor the department had issued him. "They told me ... if it was not for the vest, I would have definitely been killed," said Dunn, 45, a fifth-generation city police officer.
NEWS
By Gerard Shields and Gerard Shields,SUN STAFF | May 1, 2000
West Baltimore Councilwoman Catherine E. Pugh will introduce legislation today to ban the sale of body armor to Baltimore minors. Pugh's legislation would be introduced two weeks after police found a bulletproof vest on a 17-year-old shooting suspect accused of killing a city police officer in a car chase. Officers in some sections of the city report a rise in the protective gear among teen suspects involved in the city's estimated $1 billion-a-year illegal drug trade. "We've got to do something," Pugh said.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann and Peter Hermann,SUN STAFF | April 25, 2000
The shooting Thursday night was brazen, but not unusual by Baltimore standards. A teen-ager stood at a street corner and unloaded a semiautomatic handgun into a small crowd, hitting one man in the leg. It was what the young man was wearing that astounded Baltimore's new police commissioner: His chest and back were protected with body armor. "This incident speaks for itself," said an angry Edward T. Norris after the teen-ager was charged with killing an officer as he made a getaway in a Ford Bronco and plowed into a cruiser.
NEWS
By Julie Scharper and Julie Scharper,Sun reporter | March 17, 2008
A man wearing body armor shot two police officers in an East Baltimore alley early yesterday after fleeing the scene of another shooting, police said. The suspect, Curtis Blache, 28, of no fixed address, was in critical condition and on life support at Johns Hopkins Hospital yesterday after he was shot several times in the torso by officers, police Commissioner Frederick H. Bealefeld III said at a news conference. According to police, Officer Anthony Jobst, 47, was in his patrol car in the first block of E. Lafayette Ave. about 2:30 a.m. when he heard gunshots and saw a white Audi speeding away.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | October 20, 2012
The two men wore body armor with "POLICE" written across the chest and spilled out of their unmarked car, weapons drawn, ordering Christopher Dukes and his passenger out of their vehicle at a South Baltimore gas station parking lot. When Dukes pulled off, they embarked on a high-speed chase down Interstate 295 until catching up and placing the pair under arrest, charging documents show. Then it was time for the real police to take over. The men in the body armor were not Baltimore police officers or federal agents, but instead a little-known classification of security guards known as "special police," who are commissioned by the city or state to arrest and detain citizens - but only on specific properties.
NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown, The Baltimore Sun | July 20, 2012
The suspect in the Colorado movie theater shootings is not and has never been a member of the armed forces, the Pentagon said Friday. Authorities say shooting suspect James Holmes carried an assault rifle, a shotgun and a handgun and wore full body armor during the attack that left 12 dead and dozens injured at the theater in Aurora, Colo. Police say his apartment was rigged with explosives. The Pentagon said two airmen and one sailor were injured in the attack. Another sailor who was known to have been at the theater was unaccounted for. Aurora is home to Buckley Air Force Base, and an hour's drive from the Air Force Academy at Colorado Springs.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | July 13, 2012
A Beverly Hills sports drink maker being sued by Baltimore-based Under Armour Inc. says the trademark infringement lawsuit is without merit, according to court documents filed Thursday. The lawsuit filed April 26 in U.S. District Court in Baltimore says drink maker Body Armor Nutrition LLC uses a brand name and logo that confuses consumers. The complaint seeks an injunction banning the California company from using the name Body Armor and a logo and tagline that Under Armour says is similar to its own. Body Armor's court filing says it would be nearly impossible for consumers to confuse brands that sell unrelated products.
BUSINESS
By Gus G. Sentementes, The Baltimore Sun | March 20, 2012
The days of using two-dimensional X-rays to analyze body armor, troop helmets and projectiles have just been put behind Chesapeake Testing. That's because Chesapeake, a small company with its own firing ranges and ballistics analysis equipment, has moved into 3D. The firm invested a few million dollars building out its capacity for the next generation in materials analysis: powerful CT scan technology. The Belcamp company this year acquired a 225-450kV microfocus X-ray and computer tomography system — one of only three in the world made by its manufacturer, Nikon.
EXPLORE
AEGIS STAFF REPORT | March 19, 2012
A unique industrial CT X-ray scanning capability to analyze or inspect the construction and performance of a product in 3-dimension - including many components used on the battlefield - was unveiled at Chesapeake Testing in Harford County Thursday. The scanner was demonstrated during an open house at the Belcamp company attended by Harford County officials, representatives of the business community and Aberdeen Proving Ground and Congressman C.A. "Dutch" Ruppersburger. According to Chesapeake Testing, the new scanner is the only one of its kind in the United States and just one of three in operation in the world.
NEWS
By Scott Calvert, The Baltimore Sun | May 21, 2011
The daylong conference Saturday at Johns Hopkins Hospital was held to showcase advances on research into traumatic brain injury. One recurring theme was the devastating toll such injuries have taken on an estimated 200,000 American soldiers wounded by explosions in Iraq and Afghanistan. The PowerPoint-wielding medical specialists had much progress to share. But the extent to which these brain injuries remain a stubborn mystery was highlighted when a doctor who treats soldiers in Fort Drum, N.Y., stepped up to the microphone at Turner Auditorium.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | August 14, 2005
For the second time since the Iraq war began, the Pentagon is struggling to replace body armor that is failing to protect U.S. troops from the most lethal attacks by insurgents. The ceramic plates in vests worn by most personnel cannot withstand certain munitions the insurgents use. But more than a year after military officials initiated an effort to replace the armor with more resistant - albeit heavier - plates, tens of thousands of soldiers are still without the stronger protection because of delays in the Pentagon's procurement system.
NEWS
By Tim Craig and Allison Klein and Tim Craig and Allison Klein,SUN STAFF | July 25, 2000
A car theft suspect shot a city detective in the chest yesterday, then raised the handgun to his own head and killed himself after refusing to drop the weapon on a busy West Baltimore street. Detective David F. Azur, 30, a decorated 7 1/2 -year veteran, was shot at point-blank range but escaped serious injury because he was wearing protective body armor. Azur was taken to the Maryland Shock Trauma Center, where he was treated for a bruised chest and released yesterday afternoon, police said.
NEWS
By Yeganeh June Torbati, The Baltimore Sun | April 27, 2011
A man fired shots at a police officer around 5 a.m. Wednesday from a home in Glen Burnie as officers responded to the residence for earlier reports of a gunshot, Anne Arundel police said. The officer, a 17-year-veteran of the force, returned fire and took cover as officers from the Special Operations Section and Crisis Negotiations Unit surrounded the home, in the 100 block of Oak Spring Drive, just off Baltimore Annapolis Boulevard. Negotiators convinced a man inside the home to surrender at around 7:45 a.m. The man was wearing body armor when he was taken into custody, police said, and no one was injured during the incident.
NEWS
By Julie Scharper and Julie Scharper,Sun reporter | March 17, 2008
A man wearing body armor shot two police officers in an East Baltimore alley early yesterday after fleeing the scene of another shooting, police said. The suspect, Curtis Blache, 28, of no fixed address, was in critical condition and on life support at Johns Hopkins Hospital yesterday after he was shot several times in the torso by officers, police Commissioner Frederick H. Bealefeld III said at a news conference. According to police, Officer Anthony Jobst, 47, was in his patrol car in the first block of E. Lafayette Ave. about 2:30 a.m. when he heard gunshots and saw a white Audi speeding away.
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