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NEWS
June 3, 1991
Sexuality has never been one of Christianity's easiest issues. From requirements in the Roman church that priests be celibate to prohibitions against divorce, sexual issues of one kind or another are sprinkled through the history of the Christian church. This week in Baltimore, the nation's largest Presbyterian group will confront yet another chapter in Christianity's continuing efforts to reconcile body and soul.When the annual General Assembly of the Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.) convenes here tomorrow, the overriding topic of conversation will be, "Keeping Body and Soul Together: Sexuality, Spirituality and Social Justice," a report commissioned by the denomination four years ago. It attempts to broaden the discussion of Christian sexual ethics beyond the familiar boundaries of upholding the goodness of sex only within the bounds of marriage.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Elizabeth Large | elizabeth.large@baltsun.com | October 23, 2009
The hottest table in Baltimore isn't in Baltimore. It's Volt in Frederick. Credit the recent spike in interest to owner/chef Bryan Voltaggio's success on Bravo's "Top Chef" reality show. Suddenly, it's impossible to get a reservation on a weekend unless you call weeks in advance. Suddenly, everyone is telling me Volt was where he or she went for an anniversary or special birthday. Voltaggio was turning out noteworthy New American cuisine in his late-19th century brick mansion before all the TV hoopla started, but he hadn't become as well-known in Baltimore as he was in Washington.
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FEATURES
By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,Sun Art Critic | June 19, 1994
In one gallery, there will be 1,830 enlarged versions of AZT pills.In the next, the set designs and part of the music from an opera in which Jack Ruby tries to make an atom bomb on the moon.In the next, a man in a rabbit suit dealing with issues of personal identity.And in the last, photographs of nude medical mannequins and photographs of rotting fruits and vegetables.Those are the parts of "Body and Soul," an exhibit opening at the Baltimore Museum of Art Wednesday that deals with issues from AIDS to pornography.
NEWS
By CAREY GOLDBERG and CAREY GOLDBERG,BOSTON GLOBE | January 6, 2006
Meditation seems to energize the sleep-deprived. It seems to help with concentration. It even seems to bolster the very structure of the brain as we age. Neuroscientists presenting their latest research at a convention of 34,000 colleagues in November had so much praise for meditation that it was starting to sound like a mantra. Their work fits into a growing body of data that tries to bring modern science to bear on age-old methods to quiet the mind. Enthusiasts have long praised the health benefits of meditative practices such as chanting, yoga, and prayer.
BUSINESS
By TOM PETERS | January 13, 1992
How's this: Best book by a CEO. Best written business book. Most spiritual and liberal business book. Most practical and conservative business book. Best business book for 20-year-olds pondering the future. The winner is: "Body & Soul," by Body Shop International founder Anita Roddick (Crown Pubs.).The first Body Shop opened on March 27, 1976, at 22 Kensington Gardens, Brighton, England. At day's end, Ms. Roddick stuffed the take, $225, into her dungaree pocket. Later that year, Ian McGlinn provided Anita and husband Gordon a desperately needed $7,000.
NEWS
By John Rivera and John Rivera,SUN STAFF | June 28, 2000
For years, the vacant lot at the southwest corner of North Avenue and Smallwood Street was overgrown with grass and littered with debris. Each summer for nearly the last decade, the members of Mount Hebron Memorial Church of God in Christ had donned work gloves to pluck broken bottles and used hypodermic needles from among the weeds so they could erect a white canvas tent on the lot for their weeklong revival. That eyesore lot has been transformed into a way station for the stomach and soul.
NEWS
By Erika Niedowski and Erika Niedowski,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | February 6, 2005
MOSCOW - The heat arrives as an assault as you climb the wide wooden steps of the sauna to sit with a towel under your derriere and a wool hat on your head - so as not to burn either end. Once, twice, more than a dozen times, an attendant scoops eucalyptus-scented water into a furnace filled with red-hot iron ingots, creating steam. Out come the tied bundles of leafy-green birch branches so that a companion can whip your body from head to toe. The next step awaits just outside the sauna door: a dunking tub filled with ice-cold water.
FEATURES
By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,SUN FILM CRITIC | March 20, 1998
When Michael Johnson was casting about for ideas for the first fund-raiser for the building fund of the Heritage Museum of African Americans in Film, one in particular caught his attention for the sweet symmetry it represented: showing a classic African-American silent film with live musical accompaniment."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Arthur Hirsch and Arthur Hirsch,Sun Staff | September 12, 1999
A glimpse over the television director's shoulder shows the next transformation involving the corner of West Fayette and Monroe. Two video screens, each the size of a compact disc box, display views from two cameras capturing a scene distilled from a book detailing a year in a West Baltimore neighborhood overrun by illegal drugs.Actors are portraying the sadness of a real father and the alienation of a real teen-age son. In take after take the boy turns away from his father's soft-spoken plea to stay in school, stepping off the curb outside the corner bar, turning his back on his old man, dropping his dreadlocked head and walking out of the picture.
NEWS
By Jean Leslie and Jean Leslie,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 11, 2001
"Gallop, gallop, gallop, kick!" and "Single, single, double" are the words heard in South Columbia Baptist Church three mornings a week when the Sunday school room undergoes a metamorphosis, becoming an exercise studio. This isn't just any exercise class - it's a ministry. Class members start and end each session with a prayer. They dance exclusively to contemporary Christian music, singing along because when they learn the words, their religious faith is deepened by the lyrics they are dancing to - songs such as "God Is in This Place" by Plus One, "Laying Down My Will" by Raze and "Faith, Hope and Love" by Point of Grace.
NEWS
By Steven Barrie-Anthony | February 20, 2005
What treasure would you save if a natural disaster struck?dyd The key to a lifetime of sound sleep, says one Atlanta attorney. "If there's a fire, what am I going in there for? I've thought about that," says Asim Raza. "Kids and wife. And then -- my pillow. If you're 35 and you've been sleeping on the same pillow for 31 years, you don't take that lightly." This isn't a joke to Raza, or to the many other adults who are deeply attached to the cushions that lull them to sleep each night. Before getting married, Raza told his fiancee, "My pillow is really important to me."
NEWS
By Erika Niedowski and Erika Niedowski,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | February 6, 2005
MOSCOW - The heat arrives as an assault as you climb the wide wooden steps of the sauna to sit with a towel under your derriere and a wool hat on your head - so as not to burn either end. Once, twice, more than a dozen times, an attendant scoops eucalyptus-scented water into a furnace filled with red-hot iron ingots, creating steam. Out come the tied bundles of leafy-green birch branches so that a companion can whip your body from head to toe. The next step awaits just outside the sauna door: a dunking tub filled with ice-cold water.
SPORTS
By Christian Ewell and Christian Ewell,SUN STAFF | February 4, 2005
The attractions of professional football are apparent to anyone with the ability to reach that level, and for many others who don't. The modern player can count on glory and healthy salaries from his work. That has always made the risks of playing seem worth taking. "For 90 percent, they would say they would do it again," said Kevin Guskiewicz, research director of the Center for the Study of Retired Athletes at the University of North Carolina. "Fame, money. It was important to them, and it outweighs the complications that result later in life."
NEWS
By Kate Shatzkin and Kate Shatzkin,SUN STAFF | February 4, 2004
SAN DIEGO - In this working-class neighborhood near San Diego's eastern border, the Ray and Joan Kroc Corps Community Center is the face of the Salvation Army - one that seems a long way from the image of storefront missions and volunteers ringing bells to help the downtrodden. The entranceway, labeled "Doorway to Opportunity," is propped wide open on a recent evening - the better to accommodate a steady flow of tots and parents to the ice rink and teen-agers to the basketball court. Women in swim caps and men in goggles perform twilight laps at the outdoor pool, their arms breaking the surface in sync.
NEWS
By Lauren Rosenblum and Lauren Rosenblum,SUN STAFF | August 14, 2003
Eric Walderman sauntered into Gallery II at Howard County Center for the Arts and pointed out his favorite creation - a muted, three-dimensional multicolored paper cutout mounted on black cardboard. "I like artwork that comes right at you," he told his parents and 5-year-old niece. "If it doesn't meet you, why should you meet it?" Walderman, 34, has several of his pieces hanging in the gallery, including Untitled, a 3-D watercolor he created in his therapeutic art class, Focus on Art. The work of students from Focus on Art and its partner class for disabled teen-agers, Exploring Arts, is featured in No Boundaries, an exhibit at Center for the Arts through Aug. 22. Walderman, who was struck by a car outside his parents' home when he was 10, suffers from a brain injury that causes tremors, limits control of his motor skills and impairs his speech.
NEWS
By John E. Woodruff and John E. Woodruff,Tokyo Bureau | February 23, 1993
TOKYO -- Ask singer Mel Torme what his kind did through those grim years from the mid-1960s to the mid-1980s, when most of America turned its back on jazz. He has a ready answer."Jazz never died, it just took a long trip to Japan and Europe."For most of two decades, it seemed that jazz might never regain a place in its own country against wave after wave of rock. Those were the years when Tokyo's thousands of studious jazz fans, scores of clubs and dozens of concerts and festivals helped keep the music and its U.S. musicians alive.
FEATURES
By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,SUN ART CRITIC | June 23, 1998
Recipe for art-related, history-related, fund-raising-related fun: Play a round of miniature golf at Art Links, down at Rash Field on the southern shore of the Inner Harbor.Art Links, the brainchild of Maryland Art Place, has a series of 18 holes all designed by artists, and all thematically linked to Baltimore.There's Ramparts and Ram Putts, the Fort McHenry hole by Tim Kirk, where the player can attack the fort either by land or by sea. There's Exit Interchange, by Y. David Chung and Tom Ashcraft, where the ball gets hit into a series of highway ramps.
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