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By Carl Schoettler and Carl Schoettler,SUN STAFF | June 12, 2004
This corner of Little Italy has a soft Mediterranean feel with the murmur of Italian drifting over the click of boccie balls in the fading twilight. We could be in a village square anywhere from Sicily to Tirolo. But we're on the boccie courts on Stiles Street, just half a block from St. Leo's church. Rose Castagnoli Apicella, a prima donna di boccie in a pink-striped T-shirt, pink shorts and very sensible shoes, plants her feet solidly on the boccie court, squats slightly, then steps forward to release her ball as softly as if she were rolling an egg. The red ball moves at a slow stately pace to turn slightly at the end and snuggle up against the pallino, the small metal target ball.
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NEWS
By Dan Rodricks | June 29, 2010
To quote Elwood and Jake, "We're gettin' the band back together." But we don't play the blues. We play bocce. I'm looking for bowlers for Team Rodricks-Popolo, which is named for my mother, Rose Rodricks, the former Rose Popolo. We're entering the bocce tournament at the St. Gabriel Festival in Little Italy, August 21 and 22, and we're not playing for fun this time; we're playing for prize and pride — sort like the World Cup, only different. Tryouts will be held on Monday, July 12, at 7 p.m. on the courts in the 900 block of Stiles Street.
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NEWS
By Barbara H. Smith | July 5, 1991
Wooden balls collide -- clack-clack -- a sound that reverberates through the park. The next collision is of words -- uttered almost always in Italian."
ENTERTAINMENT
By [ASHLIE BAYLOR AND CHRISTINA LEE] | April 19, 2007
Balkan style The lowdown -- The sound of Balkan Beat Box is created by six musicians who mix dance hall, Gypsy soul and Balkan brass into an energetic live show. Get a taste of the band's stylish vibe Monday night at Towson's Recher Theatre. If you go -- Doors open at 7 p.m. Recher Theatre is at 512 York Road. Tickets are $12-$15. For more information, call 410-337-7178 or go to recherthea tre.com. Mid-century avant-garde The lowdown -- With their "He Took Her to a Movie" series, Westnorth Studio and the Jive Social Club promise a different kind of date night.
NEWS
By Norris P. West and Norris P. West,Staff Writer | October 8, 1993
Take one look at The Champ's steely stare down the boccie court and you get the feeling some people in Little Italy take this game seriously. Listen to the men jab at one another in Italian and you're sure."
NEWS
By DAN RODRICKS | June 14, 1999
There are many things to which the tradition-conscious Baltimorean looks forward each spring and summer in the Queen City of the Patapsco Drainage Basin -- the return of the Orioles to Camden Yards, the blossoming of the Flower Mart in Mount Vernon, the start of another round of ethnic festivals, the return of Sunday car polishing in Druid Hill Park and the appearance of Rosie Apicella on the boccie courts in Little Italy.Of course, it's not enough for the effervescent Rosie to merely appear there and to smile, hug and kiss old friends.
NEWS
By Dan Rodricks | June 10, 1996
For four primary reasons, it was a perfect weekend for the St. Anthony Festival in Little Italy: The rain held off, and everyone in the old neighborhood was inclined to regard that as a miracle; it was hot and humid, and everyone sweated a lot; the Monaldi Brothers played Italian melodies; and the annual boccie tournament was long, competitive and marked by wise old men in Bermuda shorts and guayabera shirts.So the traditions were as thick as the line at the pasta and meatball stand, except for one thing -- the emergence of women as a force at the male-dominated boccie courts.
FEATURES
By Dan Rodricks and Dan Rodricks,SUN STAFF | June 11, 2001
Another generation cometh - and they play boccie with cell phones on their hips. They stood out yesterday like a couple of Euro-chic hunks among the old masters at the annual all-day boccie tournament of the St. Anthony Festival in Little Italy - 29-year-old Filippo Lumaro of Bel Air and 30-year-old Vincenzo Castellano of Perry Hall, duded up and slicked back, playing their fathers' game and beating them at it. This kind of thing doesn't happen much...
NEWS
By DAN RODRICKS | June 7, 1995
Holy cannoli, look what I started in Little Italy. The St. Anthony Festival is this weekend. The boccie tournament is Sunday at high noon. And not only is Luigi Boeri proclaiming himself the champ already, but he's bad-mouthing me.Why? Because in last week's column announcing the competition and my search for a partner, I failed to list Luigi Boeri's name among Little Italy's finest players. (Luigi Boeri doesn't even like the way I spell boccie -- with an "i" -- which is the Anglicized version favored by this English-language newspaper.
NEWS
By M. Dion Thompson and M. Dion Thompson,SUN STAFF | May 30, 2002
The bright lights that troubled neighbors and diners near the boccie ball court in Little Italy came down yesterday, but peace hasn't returned to the tight-knit neighborhood just east of downtown Baltimore. The battle line has simply moved about 50 feet to the other side of the court. In a community that sometimes resembles a family, fights are bitter, filled with recriminations and accusations. Sure, the dispute might center over the boccie court, a narrow patch of concrete at 906 Stiles St., but it is fueled by something much larger.
FEATURES
By Carl Schoettler and Carl Schoettler,SUN STAFF | June 12, 2004
This corner of Little Italy has a soft Mediterranean feel with the murmur of Italian drifting over the click of boccie balls in the fading twilight. We could be in a village square anywhere from Sicily to Tirolo. But we're on the boccie courts on Stiles Street, just half a block from St. Leo's church. Rose Castagnoli Apicella, a prima donna di boccie in a pink-striped T-shirt, pink shorts and very sensible shoes, plants her feet solidly on the boccie court, squats slightly, then steps forward to release her ball as softly as if she were rolling an egg. The red ball moves at a slow stately pace to turn slightly at the end and snuggle up against the pallino, the small metal target ball.
FEATURES
By Carl Schoettler | April 20, 2004
The first really warm spring weekend enticed 600 sippers to the second Highlandtown Wine Festival Sunday afternoon to taste hand-crafted urban wines created in this ungentrified East Baltimore neighborhood. Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. turned up to dance a tarantella, while festival-goers tasted the offerings of about two dozen winemakers. In the judging of the homemade wines, a father-son duo, Dominic and Davide Parravano, took first in the white-wine category with a blend of Chenin Blanc and Thompson Seedless grapes.
NEWS
By Gus G. Sentementes and Gus G. Sentementes,SUN STAFF | January 4, 2004
For die-hard boccie players, winters in Baltimore have typically meant a gloomy hiatus from Little Italy's outdoor courts. What Baltimore lacked, many lamented, was an indoor boccie court - like the kinds some of the players had competed on in tournaments as far away as Canada. That all changed yesterday in the gymnasium of a church in Highlandtown. Including the Little Italy regulars and a foursome from Delaware, boccie players descended on Our Lady of Pompei Roman Catholic Church off Conkling Street for the opening - and blessing - of what organizers called the first regulation-size indoor court in Maryland.
NEWS
By M. Dion Thompson and M. Dion Thompson,SUN STAFF | May 30, 2002
The bright lights that troubled neighbors and diners near the boccie ball court in Little Italy came down yesterday, but peace hasn't returned to the tight-knit neighborhood just east of downtown Baltimore. The battle line has simply moved about 50 feet to the other side of the court. In a community that sometimes resembles a family, fights are bitter, filled with recriminations and accusations. Sure, the dispute might center over the boccie court, a narrow patch of concrete at 906 Stiles St., but it is fueled by something much larger.
NEWS
By Stephanie Desmon and Stephanie Desmon,SUN STAFF | May 6, 2002
It was getting too dark for Little Italy's boccie rollers to play their game on the city's Stiles Street courts late into the night. The lights weren't bright enough anymore, with leaves from the court's trees casting shadows all over the place. So they installed brighter ones. The lights have shattered a relative peace that has long existed among neighbors in this corner of Baltimore. Put up without a permit or permission, the glare from the lights was so strong that one neighbor had to staple black trash bags over her 10-year-old son's window so he could sleep at night.
FEATURES
By Dan Rodricks and Dan Rodricks,SUN STAFF | June 11, 2001
Another generation cometh - and they play boccie with cell phones on their hips. They stood out yesterday like a couple of Euro-chic hunks among the old masters at the annual all-day boccie tournament of the St. Anthony Festival in Little Italy - 29-year-old Filippo Lumaro of Bel Air and 30-year-old Vincenzo Castellano of Perry Hall, duded up and slicked back, playing their fathers' game and beating them at it. This kind of thing doesn't happen much...
NEWS
By Stephanie Desmon and Stephanie Desmon,SUN STAFF | May 6, 2002
It was getting too dark for Little Italy's boccie rollers to play their game on the city's Stiles Street courts late into the night. The lights weren't bright enough anymore, with leaves from the court's trees casting shadows all over the place. So they installed brighter ones. The lights have shattered a relative peace that has long existed among neighbors in this corner of Baltimore. Put up without a permit or permission, the glare from the lights was so strong that one neighbor had to staple black trash bags over her 10-year-old son's window so he could sleep at night.
NEWS
By Gus G. Sentementes and Gus G. Sentementes,SUN STAFF | January 4, 2004
For die-hard boccie players, winters in Baltimore have typically meant a gloomy hiatus from Little Italy's outdoor courts. What Baltimore lacked, many lamented, was an indoor boccie court - like the kinds some of the players had competed on in tournaments as far away as Canada. That all changed yesterday in the gymnasium of a church in Highlandtown. Including the Little Italy regulars and a foursome from Delaware, boccie players descended on Our Lady of Pompei Roman Catholic Church off Conkling Street for the opening - and blessing - of what organizers called the first regulation-size indoor court in Maryland.
NEWS
By Gail Gibson and Gail Gibson,SUN STAFF | August 14, 2000
Almost any warm night you can find the men of Little Italy here, on the boccie court, honing their game. Yesterday's competitors, visitors to the neighborhood on a surprisingly chilly August afternoon, readily admitted they weren't masters. Some had played the game a few times before. Some not at all. But they were athletes, those who find it easy to pick up a new sport. Whether it is basketball or baseball or boccie. Whether you are lucky and you can walk, or whether you use a wheelchair.
NEWS
By DAN RODRICKS | October 11, 1999
THE BOCCIE court in Burdick Park in Northeast Baltimore is special -- home to the city's top Italian-American bowlers (they've bested boccie teams from Little Italy in tournament play in recent years) and a great good gathering place for anyone seeking signs of life in the city. At a time when fraternal organizations (and bowling leagues) have been in decline, in the age of home entertainment and the Internet, as people become increasingly isolated in the suburbs and exurbs, as some Baltimore neighborhoods suffer wholesale abandonment, the regular meeting of friends in a city park is a sign of hope.
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