Advertisement
HomeCollectionsBobby Thomson
IN THE NEWS

Bobby Thomson

FEATURED ARTICLES
SPORTS
By RAY FRAGER | January 6, 2009
Prime 9 6 p.m. [MLB Network] The new channel's show picking all-time top nines runs consecutive programs on best center fielders and top home runs. I haven't seen either yet, but I'll go with Willie Mays and Bobby Thomson. You say Joe DiMaggio (left) and Bill Mazeroski. Or maybe Ken Griffey Jr. and Kirk Gibson. In any case, you can argue with your television from 6 to 7.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By David Driver | September 10, 2013
What is it about fathers, sons and baseball? What makes the sport so special that it is passed down the family line, normally among males? But I should quickly add that my wife learned to keep score from her father while going to Fenway Park in Boston in the 1970s, something she still does these days as a season ticket holder to the Washington Nationals. Despite the recent and ongoing problems with performance-enhancement drugs in Major League Baseball, and the ascent of the National Football League as the most popular sport in our country, baseball remains a sport like any other that is passed down from one generation to the next.
Advertisement
NEWS
By Joan Mellen and Joan Mellen,special the sun | September 28, 1997
"Underworld," by Don DeLillo. Scribner. 827 pages. $27.50.Don DeLillo's magnificent new "Underworld," at once among the finest works of American fiction of this century, opens at the Polo Grounds on Oct. 3, 1951. Behind Frank Sinatra, Jackie Gleason, who vomits on Sinatra's shoe, and Toots Shor sits the sinister J. Edgar Hoover. On the same day Bobby Thomson hits a home run that breaks the hearts of the Dodgers and the Soviets explode an atomic bomb.DeLillo has produced in one rich volume a work which surpasses even John Dos Passos' three-volume "USA."
NEWS
August 28, 2010
Don't say it ain't so. That is one lesson to be learned from the parade of sports heroes who have been questioned by federal authorities about using steroids and other performance-enhancers. The latest star whose luster has dimmed considerably, former hurler Roger Clemens, has been indicted by a federal grand jury on charges that he lied before Congress. The charges stem from Mr. Clemens' 2008 testimony in which he heatedly denied that he had used performance-enhancing drugs. If convicted, he could face up to 30 years in prison and a $1.5 million fine.
SPORTS
By McClatchy News Service | May 24, 1995
OAKLAND, Calif. -- It would be a fate worse than that faced by Ralph Branca or Mitch Williams.Imagine being the pitcher who hit Cal Ripken, forcing the Orioles shortstop out of the lineup and ending the second-longest playing streak in baseball history.This week Oakland A's pitchers are in the spotlight. None would willingly hit Ripken, who, after last night's series opener, is 99 games shy of breaking Lou Gehrig's record of playing in 2,130 consecutive games. Pitching him away, to his strength, just to stay safe is not supposed to be in their minds.
NEWS
August 30, 2005
BOBBY THOMSON has nothing on Michael Memea's dream moment. After his team rallied from a three-run deficit, the 12-year-old catcher from Ewa Beach hit a game-winning home run to defeat Curacao, 7-6, and win the Little League World Series on Sunday. It was the first extra-innings Little League World Series game in 34 years and left sportswriters on Oahu wondering if Michael's Kilauean smoking of a full-count pitch wasn't the biggest blast in Hawaii history. We know, we know. Holding a world championship for 11- and 12-year-olds -- and broadcasting it internationally -- sounds like a formula for disaster, an abuse of vulnerable pre-teens whose recreation shouldn't be taken so seriously.
SPORTS
By Pedro Gomez and Pedro Gomez,McClatchy News Service | May 23, 1995
OAKLAND, Calif. -- It would be a fate worse than that faced by Ralph Branca or Mitch Williams.Imagine being the pitcher who hit Cal Ripken, forcing the Orioles shortstop out of the lineup and ending the second-longest playing streak in baseball history.Over the next three days Oakland A's pitchers will be in the spotlight. None would willingly hit Ripken, who is 100 games shy of breaking Lou Gehrig's record of playing in 2,130 consecutive games. Pitching him away, to his strength, just to stay safe is not supposed to be in their minds.
NEWS
By David Driver | September 10, 2013
What is it about fathers, sons and baseball? What makes the sport so special that it is passed down the family line, normally among males? But I should quickly add that my wife learned to keep score from her father while going to Fenway Park in Boston in the 1970s, something she still does these days as a season ticket holder to the Washington Nationals. Despite the recent and ongoing problems with performance-enhancement drugs in Major League Baseball, and the ascent of the National Football League as the most popular sport in our country, baseball remains a sport like any other that is passed down from one generation to the next.
NEWS
August 28, 2010
Don't say it ain't so. That is one lesson to be learned from the parade of sports heroes who have been questioned by federal authorities about using steroids and other performance-enhancers. The latest star whose luster has dimmed considerably, former hurler Roger Clemens, has been indicted by a federal grand jury on charges that he lied before Congress. The charges stem from Mr. Clemens' 2008 testimony in which he heatedly denied that he had used performance-enhancing drugs. If convicted, he could face up to 30 years in prison and a $1.5 million fine.
SPORTS
November 3, 1991
Do you need an explanation of the infield fly rule? Has a friend ever stumped you by asking who was on deck when Bobby Thomson hit the shot heard 'round the world? If you have a question about sports, we can answer it. Or at least we'll try. Starting next Sunday, The Sun answers your questions about rules, trivia, anything to do with sports. Write to:DID YOU EVER WONDER WHY?Sun Sports DepartmentBaltimore Sun501 N. Calvert St.( Baltimore, MD 21278-0001
SPORTS
By RAY FRAGER | January 6, 2009
Prime 9 6 p.m. [MLB Network] The new channel's show picking all-time top nines runs consecutive programs on best center fielders and top home runs. I haven't seen either yet, but I'll go with Willie Mays and Bobby Thomson. You say Joe DiMaggio (left) and Bill Mazeroski. Or maybe Ken Griffey Jr. and Kirk Gibson. In any case, you can argue with your television from 6 to 7.
NEWS
August 30, 2005
BOBBY THOMSON has nothing on Michael Memea's dream moment. After his team rallied from a three-run deficit, the 12-year-old catcher from Ewa Beach hit a game-winning home run to defeat Curacao, 7-6, and win the Little League World Series on Sunday. It was the first extra-innings Little League World Series game in 34 years and left sportswriters on Oahu wondering if Michael's Kilauean smoking of a full-count pitch wasn't the biggest blast in Hawaii history. We know, we know. Holding a world championship for 11- and 12-year-olds -- and broadcasting it internationally -- sounds like a formula for disaster, an abuse of vulnerable pre-teens whose recreation shouldn't be taken so seriously.
NEWS
By Joan Mellen and Joan Mellen,special the sun | September 28, 1997
"Underworld," by Don DeLillo. Scribner. 827 pages. $27.50.Don DeLillo's magnificent new "Underworld," at once among the finest works of American fiction of this century, opens at the Polo Grounds on Oct. 3, 1951. Behind Frank Sinatra, Jackie Gleason, who vomits on Sinatra's shoe, and Toots Shor sits the sinister J. Edgar Hoover. On the same day Bobby Thomson hits a home run that breaks the hearts of the Dodgers and the Soviets explode an atomic bomb.DeLillo has produced in one rich volume a work which surpasses even John Dos Passos' three-volume "USA."
SPORTS
By McClatchy News Service | May 24, 1995
OAKLAND, Calif. -- It would be a fate worse than that faced by Ralph Branca or Mitch Williams.Imagine being the pitcher who hit Cal Ripken, forcing the Orioles shortstop out of the lineup and ending the second-longest playing streak in baseball history.This week Oakland A's pitchers are in the spotlight. None would willingly hit Ripken, who, after last night's series opener, is 99 games shy of breaking Lou Gehrig's record of playing in 2,130 consecutive games. Pitching him away, to his strength, just to stay safe is not supposed to be in their minds.
SPORTS
By Pedro Gomez and Pedro Gomez,McClatchy News Service | May 23, 1995
OAKLAND, Calif. -- It would be a fate worse than that faced by Ralph Branca or Mitch Williams.Imagine being the pitcher who hit Cal Ripken, forcing the Orioles shortstop out of the lineup and ending the second-longest playing streak in baseball history.Over the next three days Oakland A's pitchers will be in the spotlight. None would willingly hit Ripken, who is 100 games shy of breaking Lou Gehrig's record of playing in 2,130 consecutive games. Pitching him away, to his strength, just to stay safe is not supposed to be in their minds.
SPORTS
By Peter Schmuck | December 26, 2007
In a perfectworld, the perfect sports momentwould look something like Bobby Thomson's "Shot Heard Round the World" in 1951. The suspense. The ball disappearing into the disbelieving crowd. The announcer going insane. Nothing like that capturedmy imagination this year, because thiswas not like any other year,especially in Baltimore. The most important things affecting sports happened off the field, and the one that ismy favorite isn?t going to be very original. When Cal Ripken strode to the podium on July 29 to acknowledge his induction into baseball's Hall of Fame, the only thing I could think ofwas the title of a great Don Henley song: "The End of the Innocence."
NEWS
July 1, 1993
James E. Riesbeck, 50, a Corning Inc. executive who led the redevelopment of the Watkins Glen International race track, died Monday after undergoing treatment for a heart ailment at Robert Packer Hospital in Sayre, Pa.* Samuel J. "Red" Russotti, 81, the reputed head of Rochester, N.Y.'s organized crime family, died Friday in the Federal Correctional Institution in Milan, Mich. He had been in prison since 1984 and would have been eligible for parole in October 1994.* Cuban pianist Emiliano Salvador, 66, who once played for the Cuban National Ballet and led an orchestra on the island nation, has died of a heart attack in Miami.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.