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By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | April 30, 1999
Bobby McFerrin's concert with the Baltimore Symphony last night in Meyerhoff Hall was filled with surprises.McFerrin, a celebrated jazz soloist who began showing up on podiums less than 10 years ago, has improved as a conductor since his first appearance with the orchestra in January 1997. Don't misunderstand. The performances of McFerrin, a great musician with a solid classical background, were fine back then. It's just that they were better this time.He led Mozart's early cantata, "Exulsate, jubilate" (K. 165)
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By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | April 2, 2005
Bobby McFerrin is back at the Meyerhoff for another collaboration with the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra, this one devoted largely to Mozart. The program, which repeats tonight, is part of the BSO's Symphony With a Twist series. It could use a little more twist. Although there will always be some folks getting their first exposure to McFerrin's distinctive, crowd-pleasing brand of vocalism during the obligatory improvisation portion of his concerts, and others who will never tire of hearing it, the rest of us could use a fresh idea or two. Funny how most classical music types are struggling with ways to enliven 200-year-old concert formats.
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By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | April 5, 2003
If, like me, you've grown a little weary of the Bobby McFerrin act - and judging by the empty seats last night at Meyerhoff Hall, there may be quite a few of you - just get over it. His appearance with the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra and an impressive lineup of vocal forces is well worth catching this weekend. To begin with, the primarily choral program is substantive and filling. And McFerrin has the works by Bach, Barber and Bernstein (a nice new twist on "The Three Bs") in a fairly firm grasp.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Rashod D. Ollison and Rashod D. Ollison,Sun Pop Music Critic | June 10, 2004
The song was fierce, a bizarre banger with an odd Indian vocal sample riding the groove of B.T. Express' "Do It ('Til You're Satisfied)." Truth Hurts' "Addictive," produced by Dr. Dre and DJ Quik with a smoothed-out rap from legendary rhyme spitter Rakim, was one of the biggest crossover hits of 2002. The video, replete with hip-shaking Indian-inspired dance sequences, stayed in frequent rotation on MTV and BET. The joint thumped from countless radio and club speakers and hit No. 1. In the mix of exotic beats and shrill melisma, Truth extolled the man of her dreams: He's so contagious, he turns my pages He's got me anxious, he's what I waited for He keeps me guessin', spon -- tan -- ne -- ous ... After "Addictive" fell off the charts, it looked as if Truth would join Anita Ward ("Ring My Bell")
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | February 10, 2001
Johann Sebastian Bach loved to improvise, had a streak of sly musical humor, and wasn't averse to shaking up prim and proper audiences (congregations, actually). So he probably would have loved attending a concert featuring vocal improv virtuoso and conductor Bobby McFerrin. McFerrin is in town for the first of two stints with the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra this season (he'll be back in May); for this program, which repeats tonight, he's leading two major works by Bach and offering his familiar one-voice-band stylings.
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | April 2, 2005
Bobby McFerrin is back at the Meyerhoff for another collaboration with the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra, this one devoted largely to Mozart. The program, which repeats tonight, is part of the BSO's Symphony With a Twist series. It could use a little more twist. Although there will always be some folks getting their first exposure to McFerrin's distinctive, crowd-pleasing brand of vocalism during the obligatory improvisation portion of his concerts, and others who will never tire of hearing it, the rest of us could use a fresh idea or two. Funny how most classical music types are struggling with ways to enliven 200-year-old concert formats.
FEATURES
By David Donovan and David Donovan,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 24, 1997
Musical magic was in great supply Saturday evening at the Meyerhoff with the King's Singers. Only the King's Singers could present Renaissance madrigals and British folk songs with the Beatles, Beach Boys and Bobby McFerrin and a highly demanding contemporary work with such ease and panache.This is one of the few groups whose live performances are much more vivid than their large and splendid recorded repertoire.The motet "Ave Virgo" by the Belgium composer Adrian Willaert impressively began the evening.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Karin Remesch | April 29, 1999
Bay Bridge WalkThousands of walkers are expected to make their way across the 4.3-mile eastbound span of the Bay Bridge on Sunday. The 25th annual Chesapeake Bay Bridge Walk begins at 9 a.m., but shuttle buses start taking walkers to the Eastern Shore starting point at 8:30 a.m. A $1 donation for ages 6 and older is requested. Authorized parking areas include the Navy-Marine Corps Stadium on Rowe Boulevard in Annapolis, Anne Arundel Community College in Arnold and the Chesapeake Bay Business Park in Stevensville.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,Pop Music Critic | February 28, 1992
Bobby McFerrinWhen: Sunday shows at 5 and 8 p.m.Where: Stephens Hall, Towson State University.Tickets: $22.50.Call: (410) 830-2787 for information, (410) 481-7328 for tickets. Where would you file Bobby McFerrin?That question has been tormenting people -- music fans in general and record store clerks in particular -- for years now. Given his Grammy awards for jazz singing, it's tempting just to put him in that pigeonhole, and let his reputation rest on albums like "The Voice" and "Spontaneous Inventions."
NEWS
By Glenn McNatt | November 26, 1995
WHEN WORLD-REnowned soprano Kathleen Battle gave her first recital in Baltimore, the city was mired in ice so thick one risked life and limb merely to walk on the sidewalks. Yet nobody who had a ticket stayed home because of the weather. There wasn't an empty seat at Meyerhoff Symphony Hall that night.Question: If people will travel through snow and sleet to hear Ms. Battle perform two hours worth of 100-year-old tunes sung in incomprehensible German, French and Italian, what might they do were the diva to sing pop songs in English?
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | April 5, 2003
If, like me, you've grown a little weary of the Bobby McFerrin act - and judging by the empty seats last night at Meyerhoff Hall, there may be quite a few of you - just get over it. His appearance with the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra and an impressive lineup of vocal forces is well worth catching this weekend. To begin with, the primarily choral program is substantive and filling. And McFerrin has the works by Bach, Barber and Bernstein (a nice new twist on "The Three Bs") in a fairly firm grasp.
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | February 10, 2001
Johann Sebastian Bach loved to improvise, had a streak of sly musical humor, and wasn't averse to shaking up prim and proper audiences (congregations, actually). So he probably would have loved attending a concert featuring vocal improv virtuoso and conductor Bobby McFerrin. McFerrin is in town for the first of two stints with the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra this season (he'll be back in May); for this program, which repeats tonight, he's leading two major works by Bach and offering his familiar one-voice-band stylings.
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | May 11, 1999
Anyone who enjoys listening to classical music knows that the classical division of the recording industry is in trouble -- at least in the United States. Compared to sales of pop records, classical sales have always been a tiny part of the industry's revenue. But never have they been so small as they are now. As high as five percent as recently as the late 1980s, they are currently estimated between one and two percent of total sales. And that figure takes into account the occasional "crossover" blockbusters that feature team-ups such as the "Three Tenors" or cellist Yo-Yo Ma and jazz vocalist Bobby McFerrin.
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | April 30, 1999
Bobby McFerrin's concert with the Baltimore Symphony last night in Meyerhoff Hall was filled with surprises.McFerrin, a celebrated jazz soloist who began showing up on podiums less than 10 years ago, has improved as a conductor since his first appearance with the orchestra in January 1997. Don't misunderstand. The performances of McFerrin, a great musician with a solid classical background, were fine back then. It's just that they were better this time.He led Mozart's early cantata, "Exulsate, jubilate" (K. 165)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Karin Remesch | April 29, 1999
Bay Bridge WalkThousands of walkers are expected to make their way across the 4.3-mile eastbound span of the Bay Bridge on Sunday. The 25th annual Chesapeake Bay Bridge Walk begins at 9 a.m., but shuttle buses start taking walkers to the Eastern Shore starting point at 8:30 a.m. A $1 donation for ages 6 and older is requested. Authorized parking areas include the Navy-Marine Corps Stadium on Rowe Boulevard in Annapolis, Anne Arundel Community College in Arnold and the Chesapeake Bay Business Park in Stevensville.
FEATURES
By David Donovan and David Donovan,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 24, 1997
Musical magic was in great supply Saturday evening at the Meyerhoff with the King's Singers. Only the King's Singers could present Renaissance madrigals and British folk songs with the Beatles, Beach Boys and Bobby McFerrin and a highly demanding contemporary work with such ease and panache.This is one of the few groups whose live performances are much more vivid than their large and splendid recorded repertoire.The motet "Ave Virgo" by the Belgium composer Adrian Willaert impressively began the evening.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Rashod D. Ollison and Rashod D. Ollison,Sun Pop Music Critic | June 10, 2004
The song was fierce, a bizarre banger with an odd Indian vocal sample riding the groove of B.T. Express' "Do It ('Til You're Satisfied)." Truth Hurts' "Addictive," produced by Dr. Dre and DJ Quik with a smoothed-out rap from legendary rhyme spitter Rakim, was one of the biggest crossover hits of 2002. The video, replete with hip-shaking Indian-inspired dance sequences, stayed in frequent rotation on MTV and BET. The joint thumped from countless radio and club speakers and hit No. 1. In the mix of exotic beats and shrill melisma, Truth extolled the man of her dreams: He's so contagious, he turns my pages He's got me anxious, he's what I waited for He keeps me guessin', spon -- tan -- ne -- ous ... After "Addictive" fell off the charts, it looked as if Truth would join Anita Ward ("Ring My Bell")
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | May 11, 1999
Anyone who enjoys listening to classical music knows that the classical division of the recording industry is in trouble -- at least in the United States. Compared to sales of pop records, classical sales have always been a tiny part of the industry's revenue. But never have they been so small as they are now. As high as five percent as recently as the late 1980s, they are currently estimated between one and two percent of total sales. And that figure takes into account the occasional "crossover" blockbusters that feature team-ups such as the "Three Tenors" or cellist Yo-Yo Ma and jazz vocalist Bobby McFerrin.
NEWS
By Glenn McNatt | November 26, 1995
WHEN WORLD-REnowned soprano Kathleen Battle gave her first recital in Baltimore, the city was mired in ice so thick one risked life and limb merely to walk on the sidewalks. Yet nobody who had a ticket stayed home because of the weather. There wasn't an empty seat at Meyerhoff Symphony Hall that night.Question: If people will travel through snow and sleet to hear Ms. Battle perform two hours worth of 100-year-old tunes sung in incomprehensible German, French and Italian, what might they do were the diva to sing pop songs in English?
ENTERTAINMENT
By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,Pop Music Critic | February 28, 1992
Bobby McFerrinWhen: Sunday shows at 5 and 8 p.m.Where: Stephens Hall, Towson State University.Tickets: $22.50.Call: (410) 830-2787 for information, (410) 481-7328 for tickets. Where would you file Bobby McFerrin?That question has been tormenting people -- music fans in general and record store clerks in particular -- for years now. Given his Grammy awards for jazz singing, it's tempting just to put him in that pigeonhole, and let his reputation rest on albums like "The Voice" and "Spontaneous Inventions."
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