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By STEVE McKERROW and STEVE McKERROW,SUN STAFF | September 29, 1995
A government conspiracy slowly unfolds on a new "X-Files," while a cable documentary looks back more than 35 years at the conspiracy confrontation between Bobby Kennedy and labor leader Jimmy Hoffa. Oh, and Colin Powell's back -- again -- on yet another interview show.* "Family Matters" (8 p.m.-8:30 p.m., WMAR, Channel 2) -- The old I-see-you-in-the-shower ploy, subject of recent plots in both "Friends" and "Beverly Hills, 90210," gets another outing as Urkel (Jalell) inadvertently spies a bathing Laura (Kellie Shanygne Williams)
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By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | April 10, 2004
Sharp-eyed readers of The New York Times Magazine may have noticed a recent advertisement announcing the sale of the Kennedy family's historic Hickory Hill estate in McLean, Va. The 13-bedroom, white brick Georgian home and surrounding estate is being offered by Sotheby's International Realty in New York City. It sits off Chain Bridge Road on about six acres and has 12 fireplaces, stables for horses, a movie theater, tennis courts, a pool and cabana. The asking price is reportedly $25 million, but Sotheby's officials would not comment for this article.
NEWS
By Thomas W. Waldron and Thomas W. Waldron,SUN STAFF | July 18, 1999
This was to have been a week of political and family celebration for Maryland Lt. Gov. Kathleen Kennedy Townsend. It began with a Baltimore fund-raiser and was to conclude yesterday with the wedding on Cape Cod of her youngest sister, Rory.Instead, the wedding was postponed, and Townsend and her family spent the day awaiting word on the fate of her cousin, John F. Kennedy Jr., his wife and sister-in-law.Townsend and her husband, David, were among those gathered at the Kennedy compound in Hyannis Port, Mass.
NEWS
By CARL SCHOETTLER and CARL SCHOETTLER,SUN REPORTER | December 11, 2005
American Gunfight: The Plot to Kill Harry Truman - and the Shoot-out that Stopped It Stephen Hunter and John Bainbridge Jr. The Making of an Ink-Stained Wretch Jules Witcover The Johns Hopkins University Press / 368 pages Jules Witcover may feel he's still an ink-stained wretch at 78, after a half-century in the news business. But he has loved every minute he has spent in newspapering. Or at least pretty many of them. "I've spent thousands of hours sitting, drinking, singing, writing and only occasionally sleeping on whistle stop trains, press buses, and planes from New Hampshire to California," he writes.
NEWS
By Christopher T. Assaf and Christopher T. Assaf,Staff Photographer | June 8, 2008
Happy Snaps That's how Bill Eppridge signed my starting-to-get-tattered copy of his new book A Time It Was: Bobby Kennedy in the Sixties. It is a tad ironic, the book ending with such a sad note - the death of Robert F. Kennedy at the hands of an assassin and the funeral. Something Eppridge has lived with for 40 years. That is how this business moves; the professional photojournalist often compartmentalizing strong emotion and constantly clinging to a facade of detachment. Look to the future and not continuously dwell on the past.
NEWS
By MICHAEL OLESKER | April 13, 2000
BILL CLINTON came to Annapolis on Tuesday to celebrate the signing of a gun safety measure with which everyone but the die-hards of the National Rifle Association can feel comfortable and to remember Kathleen Kennedy Townsend's father. Bobby Kennedy has been gone for 32 years, the victim of a crazed man with a gun. The NRA remembers Bobby. It's been trying to silence his ghost since 1968. In ceremonies at the State House, the president said Bobby would have been proud of his daughter. The lieutenant governor of Maryland nodded her head slightly and said a quiet, "Thank you."
NEWS
June 16, 1993
Killer InstinctTim Baker's essay on "Hero Warriors" (The Sun, June 7) couldn't have been closer to the mark regarding the overemphasis of sports in our scholastic environment -- and beyond in our country.Not only has the attitude toward the arts and sciences in education changed with the emphasis on sports over academics, but the acknowledgment of victory, in whatever physical contest, now ends up with "high fives," pumping up of the hands, usually with a near-murderous scowl on one's face.
NEWS
November 19, 1993
YOU knew the House of Representatives' vote on the North American Free Trade Agreement was big doings because the local TV stations dispatched reporters to cover it.One of the correspondents -- an anchor actually -- did a live report the night of the vote while the brightly lit Capitol dome gleamed in the gloaming behind her.Breathlessly, as is the way with an anchor on his or her bi-annual assignment, she described a "contingency" of NAFTA detractors huddling...
NEWS
March 9, 1993
If living well is the best revenge, then Spiro T. Agnew must be laughing all the way to the first tee. As Dan Fesperman reported in detail in The Sunday Sun, Ted Agnew has come a long way from the depths of disgrace and debt that accompanied his forced resignation from the vice presidency, announced in a federal courtroom in Baltimore nearly 20 years ago. He is a well-to-do international deal maker, living a life of ease in celebrity-rich, recreation-oriented Rancho...
FEATURES
By Matthew Gilbert and Matthew Gilbert,BOSTON GLOBE | October 1, 1995
Don't think you'll get a clear peek at the memory-impaired days of Ronald Reagan in the Newsweek cover story for Oct. 2. Based mostly on written comments by Nancy Reagan and interviews with Patti Davis and Michael Reagan, the article is severely limited by the family's "pact of silence" about Mr. Reagan's condition, and it dwells mostly on mom and daughter. The current life of the Reagan clan is portrayed as a family-values "happy ending," with all the warring family members lovingly reconciled.
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