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NEWS
By JONATHAN TURLEY | November 17, 2005
WASHINGTON -- A new and unexpected name was added yesterday to the rogue's gallery of leading government officials and journalists involved in the CIA leak scandal - that of Bob Woodward, the famed Watergate reporter and Washington Post editor. The Post revealed that Mr. Woodward was told the identity of Valerie Plame in mid-June 2003 by an unidentified White House official. Ms. Plame was a CIA operative who was "outed" in a column by Robert Novak in apparent retaliation against her husband, former Ambassador Joseph C. Wilson IV, for discrediting one of President Bush's justifications for the war concerning Iraqi weapons of mass destruction.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Susan Reimer, The Baltimore Sun | July 21, 2011
It is in Elsa Walsh's warm and unpretentious nature that she would not toss her husband's name around like confetti. So when architect Stephen Muse raced back from looking at a piece of waterfront property to tell her how amazing it was and how much he wanted to design a home for it, he didn't realize that the "Bob" in the "Bob and I" she kept talking about was Bob Woodward until the noted Watergate journalist and presidential reporter opened the...
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NEWS
By Carl M. Cannon | June 26, 1994
In "The Agenda," Bob Woodward uses as his springboard a pledge that Bill Clinton made at the Democratic National Convention in 1992, namely, to use the presidency to re-energize America's economy.The tale that follows is an insider's glimpse into the remarkable angst of the Clinton White House as it lurched unsteadily toward production of a budget bill that the president and his loyalists have touted as one of their great accomplishments.Privately, they thought much less of their own budget package, Mr. Woodward reveals.
NEWS
By Julie Hirschfeld Davis and Julie Hirschfeld Davis,Sun reporter | November 14, 2006
WASHINGTON -- As pressure mounted for direct talks with Iran and Syria on the crisis in Iraq, President Bush held a much-anticipated session yesterday with members of a blue-ribbon panel that is expected to propose major changes in U.S. policy toward Iraq. In public comments afterward, Bush seemed cool to the idea of engaging hostile regimes in Iran and Syria as part of a new approach to dealing with the violence in Iraq. The president also said that those who favor a phased withdrawal of U.S. troops should "recognize that the best military options depend upon the conditions on the ground."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Susan Reimer, The Baltimore Sun | July 21, 2011
It is in Elsa Walsh's warm and unpretentious nature that she would not toss her husband's name around like confetti. So when architect Stephen Muse raced back from looking at a piece of waterfront property to tell her how amazing it was and how much he wanted to design a home for it, he didn't realize that the "Bob" in the "Bob and I" she kept talking about was Bob Woodward until the noted Watergate journalist and presidential reporter opened the...
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tom Bowman and Tom Bowman,SUN STAFF | May 23, 2004
Plan of Attack, by Bob Woodward. Simon and Schuster. 443 pages. $28.Buy this book. Bob Woodward, the famed investigative journalist who is evolving into Washington's official scribe, has carefully laid out the first inside account of the Iraq War with Plan of Attack. He finally unveils what many observers suspected: Vice President Dick Cheney is the power behind the throne. After Woodward's disappointing Bush at War, which chronicles the post 9/11 world and the war in Afghanistan, in which President Bush seemed curiously decisive and powerful while Cheney was invisible, Woodward appears to have regained his footing.
NEWS
By Matea Gold and Nick Anderson and Matea Gold and Nick Anderson,LOS ANGELES TIMES | April 20, 2004
LAKE WORTH, Fla. -- Seizing on a claim that the Saudi government told the White House it would try to lower oil prices as the November election approaches, Sen. John Kerry questioned yesterday whether President Bush had put politics ahead of America's economic needs. Kerry, the presumptive Democratic presidential nominee, cited an assertion in a new book by Washington Post journalist Bob Woodward that U.S. Saudi Ambassador Prince Bandar bin Sultan told Bush that his country hoped to decrease oil prices to help the U.S. economy before Election Day. "That's the Saudi pledge," Woodward said Sunday on CBS' 60 Minutes.
NEWS
By Lynn Anderson and Lynn Anderson,SUN STAFF | September 11, 2003
Bob Woodward, the investigative reporter known for grilling government officials, may soon have to field some questions of his own from top Maryland officials about a project on his riverfront property near Annapolis. The stage was set for such an encounter yesterday when a state wetlands official said that his agency erred in approving a $10,000 shoreline erosion project at Woodward's South River estate. The permitting mistake -- made public at an Anne Arundel County Board of Appeals hearing yesterday -- means that the Washington Post editor and reporter's project may have to be reviewed by the state Board of Public Works, which includes Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. and State Comptroller William Donald Schaefer.
SPORTS
By Steven Kivinski and Steven Kivinski,CONTRIBUTING WRITER | August 7, 1997
Bob Woodward, a member of Chestnut Ridge Country Club in Lutherville, not only caught a glimpse of Tiger Woods at yesterday's Buick Open Pro-Am Tournament, but he also got to play in his group.Woodward, former general manager of WXYV (102.7 FM) and WCAO (600 AM), teed off with Woods and three amateurs yesterday morning at Warwick Hills Golf and Country Club in Grand Blanc, Mich.Woods shot a 74 and his four amateur partners, who paid $3,250 each to play in the event, finished at 14-under in the best-ball format, placing them fourth among the morning groups.
NEWS
By Nick Madigan and Nick Madigan,SUN REPORTER | September 30, 2006
A story on the front page of yesterday's New York Times was startling: The Bush administration ignored urgent warnings from the military in 2003 that thousands of additional troops were needed in Iraq, and the article also described the White House as riven by disagreement over the conduct of the war. The problem with the story was that it should have appeared first in The Washington Post. The scoop in the Times - and a similar story in the New York Daily News - was based on a new book, State of Denial, by Bob Woodward, an assistant managing editor at The Post and famous as half of the duo that unraveled the Watergate scandal.
NEWS
By Nick Madigan and Nick Madigan,SUN REPORTER | September 30, 2006
A story on the front page of yesterday's New York Times was startling: The Bush administration ignored urgent warnings from the military in 2003 that thousands of additional troops were needed in Iraq, and the article also described the White House as riven by disagreement over the conduct of the war. The problem with the story was that it should have appeared first in The Washington Post. The scoop in the Times - and a similar story in the New York Daily News - was based on a new book, State of Denial, by Bob Woodward, an assistant managing editor at The Post and famous as half of the duo that unraveled the Watergate scandal.
NEWS
By NICK MADIGAN and NICK MADIGAN,SUN REPORTER | November 17, 2005
Bob Woodward, one of the country's most celebrated reporters and an assistant managing editor at The Washington Post, apologized yesterday to his editor for having waited more than two years before revealing that a White House official disclosed to him in 2003 the identity of CIA agent Valerie Plame. Woodward, who with Carl Bernstein helped to unearth the Watergate scandal that brought down the presidency of Richard M. Nixon, testified Monday under oath about his role in the Plame case.
NEWS
By JONATHAN TURLEY | November 17, 2005
WASHINGTON -- A new and unexpected name was added yesterday to the rogue's gallery of leading government officials and journalists involved in the CIA leak scandal - that of Bob Woodward, the famed Watergate reporter and Washington Post editor. The Post revealed that Mr. Woodward was told the identity of Valerie Plame in mid-June 2003 by an unidentified White House official. Ms. Plame was a CIA operative who was "outed" in a column by Robert Novak in apparent retaliation against her husband, former Ambassador Joseph C. Wilson IV, for discrediting one of President Bush's justifications for the war concerning Iraqi weapons of mass destruction.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Ollove and Michael Ollove,SUN BOOK EDITOR | July 17, 2005
JOURNALISM THE SECRET MAN: THE STORY OF WATERGATE'S DEEP THROAT By Bob Woodward. Simon & Schuster, 249 pages. First off, The Secret Man, Bob Woodward's account of his dealing with Deep Throat, his legendary secret source, only adds incrementally to the vast body of knowledge already known about Watergate (thanks immeasurably to Woodward's own reporting in The Washington Post and his previous books). But as a portrait of the taut, complicated relationship between a reporter and confidential source who, overcoming his own conflicted motivations, puts everything at risk to disclose what he knows, it is a provocative, even stirring contribution.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tom Bowman and Tom Bowman,SUN STAFF | May 23, 2004
Plan of Attack, by Bob Woodward. Simon and Schuster. 443 pages. $28.Buy this book. Bob Woodward, the famed investigative journalist who is evolving into Washington's official scribe, has carefully laid out the first inside account of the Iraq War with Plan of Attack. He finally unveils what many observers suspected: Vice President Dick Cheney is the power behind the throne. After Woodward's disappointing Bush at War, which chronicles the post 9/11 world and the war in Afghanistan, in which President Bush seemed curiously decisive and powerful while Cheney was invisible, Woodward appears to have regained his footing.
NEWS
By Matea Gold and Nick Anderson and Matea Gold and Nick Anderson,LOS ANGELES TIMES | April 20, 2004
LAKE WORTH, Fla. -- Seizing on a claim that the Saudi government told the White House it would try to lower oil prices as the November election approaches, Sen. John Kerry questioned yesterday whether President Bush had put politics ahead of America's economic needs. Kerry, the presumptive Democratic presidential nominee, cited an assertion in a new book by Washington Post journalist Bob Woodward that U.S. Saudi Ambassador Prince Bandar bin Sultan told Bush that his country hoped to decrease oil prices to help the U.S. economy before Election Day. "That's the Saudi pledge," Woodward said Sunday on CBS' 60 Minutes.
NEWS
By David Holahan | January 24, 1992
YOU remember Bob Woodward, the young journalist in shining armor who smote down Richard Nixon almost 20 year ago. Well, Bob is all grown up now and he's gone on to other things. A couple of weeks ago he co-authored a seven-part newspaper series which boosts the political prospects of Dan Quayle.By itself, virtually regardless of content, a week-long focus on the vice president connotes that Quayle must be some fellow, all right, if that great big newspaper, the Washington Post, and its famous reporter are paying so much attention to him. Add to this unfortunate impression the fact that the articles were essentially favorable to their subject,and the bewilderment is complete.
NEWS
By Arlene Silverman | March 23, 2000
SAN FRANCISCO -- We Americans have had our flappers, our boomers, our hippies, our yippies, our yuppies. Now, as the millennium dawns, it is altogether appropriate that our English language respond to a new group for statisticians to ponder and economists to dissect: those young multimillionaires running dot-com businesses. What DOES one call 36-year-old Jeff Bezos of Amazon.com, a wunderkind whose company has set book-buying on its ear? Or Yahoo's Jerry Yang, who was 27 when that Internet stock went public in 1996?
NEWS
By Lynn Anderson and Lynn Anderson,SUN STAFF | September 11, 2003
Bob Woodward, the investigative reporter known for grilling government officials, may soon have to field some questions of his own from top Maryland officials about a project on his riverfront property near Annapolis. The stage was set for such an encounter yesterday when a state wetlands official said that his agency erred in approving a $10,000 shoreline erosion project at Woodward's South River estate. The permitting mistake -- made public at an Anne Arundel County Board of Appeals hearing yesterday -- means that the Washington Post editor and reporter's project may have to be reviewed by the state Board of Public Works, which includes Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. and State Comptroller William Donald Schaefer.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tom Bowman and By Tom Bowman,Special to the Sun | December 1, 2002
Bush at War, Bob Woodward, (Simon & Schuster) 352 pages, $28 With his occasional malapropisms, nervous laughter and goofy jokes, President Bush has been an easy mark for urban liberals and the intellectual elite. But the commander in chief we see in Bush at War is anything but fodder for late-night comedy routines. He's a real commander. Bush has a laser-like focus on the war on terror, in Bob Woodward's latest book, boring in on everything from war plans to public relations to diplomacy.
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