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By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | October 31, 2013
Edward Clark - known as "Pops" to Baltimore softball enthusiasts - could often be found along the sidelines watching a game from his red folding chair. Nearly anyone who played in adult leagues saw the 81-year-old on the fields this summer, as they have for years. But on Wednesday players were mourning the city sporting patriarch, who died after his Northwest Baltimore home burned. Officials said late Wednesday that Clark died of smoke inhalation. His death is the 14th confirmed fire death this year - up from last year's all-time low of 12. "He was more than just a city employee.
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By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | October 31, 2013
Edward Clark - known as "Pops" to Baltimore softball enthusiasts - could often be found along the sidelines watching a game from his red folding chair. Nearly anyone who played in adult leagues saw the 81-year-old on the fields this summer, as they have for years. But on Wednesday players were mourning the city sporting patriarch, who died after his Northwest Baltimore home burned. Officials said late Wednesday that Clark died of smoke inhalation. His death is the 14th confirmed fire death this year - up from last year's all-time low of 12. "He was more than just a city employee.
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NEWS
By Larry Perl, lperl@tribune.com | October 1, 2013
Skateboarding enthusiast Stephanie Murdock was 21 when she placed an ad in the Baltimore City Paper in 2004, looking for help in bringing a skate park to Hampden. "This is going to be easy," she thought. Nine years of hard work later, Murdock, now an aide to Baltimore City Councilwoman Mary Pat Clarke, basked in accolades from a large crowd of skateboarders, parents and city officials - some of whom she said doubted she would succeed - at a groundbreaking ceremony Tuesday, Oct. 1, behind Roosevelt Park, where a 5,000-square-foot concrete bowl for skateboarding was scheduled to be built starting the next day. Then, Murdock climbed into the seat of a Bobcat on the grassy site at 1221 W. 36th St. and dug up ceremonial dirt like a seasoned construction worker.
NEWS
By Larry Perl, lperl@tribune.com | October 1, 2013
Skateboarding enthusiast Stephanie Murdock was 21 when she placed an ad in the Baltimore City Paper in 2004, looking for help in bringing a skate park to Hampden. "This is going to be easy," she thought. Nine years of hard work later, Murdock, now an aide to Baltimore City Councilwoman Mary Pat Clarke, basked in accolades from a large crowd of skateboarders, parents and city officials - some of whom she said doubted she would succeed - at a groundbreaking ceremony Tuesday, Oct. 1, behind Roosevelt Park, where a 5,000-square-foot concrete bowl for skateboarding was scheduled to be built starting the next day. Then, Murdock climbed into the seat of a Bobcat on the grassy site at 1221 W. 36th St. and dug up ceremonial dirt like a seasoned construction worker.
NEWS
By Nora Koch and Nora Koch,SUN STAFF | March 30, 2000
About 1,500 rainbow trout found new -- and very temporary -- homes in four of the city's streams and ponds yesterday morning. The state Department of Natural Resources stocked Patterson Park and Gwynn Oak ponds, the Jones Falls and Herring Run with trout for anglers to catch and clean for dinner. "We want them out of here ASAP," said Bob Wall, recreational programmer for the city's Department of Recreation and Parks. Wall expects all the fish to be caught within two weeks; the four areas will be stocked again in late April.
NEWS
By Jeff Barker and Jeff Barker,Sun Reporter | January 27, 2008
The gun charge lodged against Baltimore youth football coach Aaron McCown came as organizations in Maryland and across the country were adopting new measures to prevent misbehavior by coaches and parents during games. Last fall, the Maryland State Youth Soccer Association began requiring more than a thousand coaches to be licensed. At a minimum, they must complete an 18-hour training course. On Oct. 12, Baltimore's Parks Department announced guidelines under which verbal or physical abuse of officials, coaches or players could lead to lengthy bans.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,SUN STAFF | May 9, 1996
ClarificationAn archaeological dig in Patapsco Valley State Park described in the May 9 editions of The Sun is closed to spectators. But anyone wishing to help dig is invited to contact the Archaeological Society of Maryland for information about fees and directions, (410) 727-6417.The old Indian campsite has been menaced by gravel quarries and erosion. It is hemmed in by highways and littered with trash.But somehow the little wedge of woods on the Patapsco River, less than seven miles from Baltimore's Inner Harbor, has remained mostly untouched since the last Indians left, perhaps 500 years ago.Today, a band of volunteer archaeologists armed with shovels and trowels will climb onto the rise in the Patapsco Valley State Park, near Elkridge, and sift for clues to the lives of the people who lived there, off and on, for up to 5,000 years.
NEWS
By DAN RODRICKS | April 23, 2003
I SAW a guy staring hard at shad roe the other day. He seemed to be baffled by it. I've seen this happen before -- a man's first encounter with the glistening, ruby-colored egg sac of the poor man's salmon, which runs vigorously and in big numbers up the Chesapeake and into natal rivers each spring. Some call it "delicacy." "Shad roe," I said, breaking the man's stare at the lobes. "Ever had it?" "No, what is it?" And I told him. Then he asked, "What do you do with it?" And I told him that, too, using the words "saute in bacon fat."
NEWS
By Allison Klein and Allison Klein,SUN STAFF | October 21, 2000
City workers draining Patterson Park pond yesterday found a handgun in the muck as they pulled fish out of the 2.5-acre "boat lake." The .45-caliber gun was turned over to homicide detectives, who took it downtown for tests to determine whether it had been used in a crime, police said. In addition to the handgun - and a healthy haul of large carp - city and state workers also fished out several long kitchen knives, a gold ring, a plastic children's bike, a baseball bat and a crutch. "I'm sure there's a story behind every one," said Charlie Gougeon, part of a city and state team that has been pumping the 136-year-old pond dry this week.
NEWS
By Tyrone Richardson and Tyrone Richardson,SUN STAFF | July 10, 2005
Names like Swift, Roadrunner and Lightning usually belong to race contestants demonstrating high speed. But not yesterday at Patterson Park. Such speed-inspired names were given to many of the turtles competing in the 64th annual Chesapeake Turtle Derby, held at the Pulaski Monument yesterday. About 80 turtles were tested on their crawl speed in the circular concrete area in front of the statue of the Revolutionary War hero Gen. Casimir Pulaski. The turtles were separated into three categories: box turtles, tortoises and all other types - except snapping turtles, which tend to bite.
NEWS
By Laura Smitherman and Laura Smitherman,laura.smitherman@baltsun.com | February 1, 2010
Like most people, Phyllis Friello watched in horror the events unfolding in Haiti after the devastating earthquake. She donated to UNICEF, the United Nations organization that's distributing water, food and medicine and registering children separated from their families by the disaster. But Friello, a competitive figure skater who lives in Baltimore, wanted to do more. So she put on her skates. And she sent a Facebook message to former world and national figure skating champion Kimmie Meissner.
NEWS
By Scott Calvert and Scott Calvert,SUN STAFF | July 13, 2003
Luck had smiled at least once before on many entrants in yesterday's 62nd annual Chesapeake Turtle Derby. Lily, a 30-year-old Malaysian box turtle, nearly wound up as soup in New York before escaping into the hands of a more benevolent captor. A box turtle named W almost took a fatal last step onto busy Pulaski Highway when a passing motorist scooped it up and took it home with her to East Baltimore. But the question yesterday in Patterson Park was who would be the lucky winner, when 55 turtles were tested in heats to see which could crawl fastest.
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