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NEWS
November 2, 1993
"We're not the Senate Select Committee on Voyeurism," said Sen. Barbara Mikulski yesterday. Maryland's junior senator is a member of the Select Ethics Committee. It is trying to get control of the personal diary of Sen. Bob Packwood, R-Ore., in order to determine if he has violated Senate rules or federal law.Senator Mikulski's defense of her committee is right on the mark. This exercise is not about Senator Packwood's famous sexual escapades. Senator Packwood has agreed to let the committee read those parts of the diary bearing on charges that he misbehaved sexually and then tried to cover it by intimidating witnesses.
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FEATURES
By Jean Marbella and Jean Marbella,SUN STAFF | September 25, 1995
Forget sexual harassment. Sen. Bob Packwood is guilty of cluelessness in the first degree, felonious Neanderthalism, exposing himself (as a bore) and, most of all, DWI, diary-writing while intoxicated by power.For this, he has been dealt the most capital of punishments, one both cruel and unusual: Volumes of incriminating evidence that lay him bare to the world, in the black and white of the printed page. In the cruelest of ironies, Bob Packwood is the star of two recently published books but won't even get a book tour out of it.There is the $10, 325-page quickie book that just arrived in stores, "The Packwood Report," a Times Books reprint of the Senate Ethics Committee report that would have led to his expulsion had he not resigned on Sept.
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NEWS
By ROGER SIMON | February 20, 1995
WASHINGTON -- I am watching Bob Packwood quote Shakespeare on the floor of the Senate.He is quoting the famous St. Crispin's Day speech from Henry V."We few, we happy few, we band of brothers," Packwood is saying. "For he today that sheds his blood with me, shall be my brother!"What this has to do with any matter before the Senate, I am not sure. But it is a lively performance.I'm not saying it will make us forget Laurence Olivier, but Packwood does manage to stir himself with this oration if nobody else.
NEWS
September 17, 1995
Senator TongueI would like to congratulate Mike Littwin for his hilarious article on Bob Packwood (Sept. 11).In these days of doom and gloom reporting, it was a most pleasant treat.When I read the heading of his article, I thought ''Oh, another Packwood story,'' but decided to read it anyway.I must say it made my day. Best laugh I've had in ages.Sarah PowersBel AirCrab FeastsThe crab population in the Chesapeake Bay needs our help.But how can we do it without devastating the watermen or infringing on the rights of recreational crabbers?
NEWS
October 15, 1991
Forty-one GOP senators support Clarence Thomas' confirmation for the Supreme Court. Only two, Sens. James Jeffords of Vermont and Bob Packwood of Oregon, have said they will not support him.These Democrats support Thomas: Sens. Sam Nunn and Wyche Fowler of Georgia, J. Bennett Johnston and John Breaux of Louisiana, Harry Reid and Richard Bryan of Nevada; Ernest F. Hollings of South Carolina, Dennis DeConcini of Arizona, Alan J. Dixon of Illinois, David Boren of Oklahoma, Richard Shelby of Alabama and J. James Exon of Nebraska.
NEWS
By Maggie Gallagher | September 12, 1995
THE VOICE from the airwaves was anonymous -- it could have been Everyman, or in this case every woman distressed about lingering adultery charges against presidents Bill Clinton and John F. Kennedy and Gary Hart: "We've got to stop obsessing about the private affairs of politicians."What about Bob Packwood?"Oh," she says, "that's different. That's really bad."Suddenly I was transfixed. That's it, I thought, the new emerging morality in a nutshell: What you do to your wife doesn't matter; it's how you treat your employees that counts.
NEWS
By ROGER SIMON | November 3, 1993
WASHINGTON -- Bob Packwood is currently starring in a movie of his own mental creation.He has become "The Samurai Senator!"Packwood, R-Ore., stalks back and forth on the floor of the senate, wheedling and whining one moment, thundering and slashing the next.He is one vs. many, a warrior hopelessly outnumbered, waging a war he cannot win.But he does not care. All he cares about is going down fighting, a hero in his own mind.Which is yet another example of Bob Packwood's arrested development.
NEWS
By ELLEN GOODMAN | November 5, 1993
Boston. -- It was not a pretty sight. A gaunt Bob Packwood fighting on the Senate floor for his political life. A newly righteous Bob Packwood arguing against the ethics committee's attempt to subpoena all his diaries.''Is there humor in them? Sure,'' he said to the collection of senators who were present, accounted for, and utterly miserable. ''Is there nasty comment about some of you when I got mad at something? Sure. Are there warm comments? You bet. They're personal beyond all measure.
FEATURES
By Rob Hiaasen | November 8, 1993
We called eight high-profile people because we wanted to know if they kept a diary and because eight is a nice round number.* Maryland Sen. Paul S. Sarbanes: "I don't think anyone who keeps one would admit it now. I don't keep a clean piece of paper around me, much less a diary," says the senator's press secretary, Bruce Frame. For the record: "No, the senator does not keep a diary."* Maryland Sen. Barbara A. Mikulski: Ms. Mikulski, a member of the Senate Ethics Committee seeking Sen. Bob Packwood's diaries, does not keep a diary.
NEWS
By Washington Bureau | January 26, 1993
WASHINGTON -- Sen. Barbara A. Mikulski has emerged as a likely candidate for the Senate ethics committee, a panel under fire for its reluctance to hold senators accountable for ethical violations, congressional officials said yesterday.Ethics committee staff members and a representative of Senate Majority Leader George J. Mitchell refused to comment, but other sources said the appointment of the Maryland Democrat could come as early as today. A spokesman for Ms. Mikulski said she would accept a seat on the panel, if it is offered.
NEWS
By Knight-Ridder News Service | September 13, 1995
WASHINGTON -- House Republicans unveiled part of their Medicare reforms yesterday, touting a plan that would let retirees opt out of traditional Medicare and manage their own health care costs instead.The government would give beneficiaries a cash voucher to help set up special bank accounts for routine medical bills and also buy private insurance for serious illnesses.House leaders said the idea -- known as "medical savings accounts," or MSAs for short -- would be one of the key elements in their plan, due out within a week.
NEWS
By Maggie Gallagher | September 12, 1995
THE VOICE from the airwaves was anonymous -- it could have been Everyman, or in this case every woman distressed about lingering adultery charges against presidents Bill Clinton and John F. Kennedy and Gary Hart: "We've got to stop obsessing about the private affairs of politicians."What about Bob Packwood?"Oh," she says, "that's different. That's really bad."Suddenly I was transfixed. That's it, I thought, the new emerging morality in a nutshell: What you do to your wife doesn't matter; it's how you treat your employees that counts.
NEWS
By JACK GERMOND & JULES WITCOVER | September 9, 1995
WASHINGTON -- The political execution of Bob Packwood was carried out by the Senate with its usual devotion to ritual and ceremony. Once he announced he was finally leaving, colleagues determined to bury him took to the Senate floor to praise him.Hyperbole and hypocrisy are staples of American politics, and nowhere more obviously than in Congress. Those who are defeated or drummed out always are the subjects of eulogies that might make any sensible person wonder why they are going.But the real message in the swift and certain punishment levied against Bob Packwood is that even the Senate has changed.
NEWS
September 8, 1995
In its anguished handling of the case against Sen. Bob Packwood, who resigned yesterday rather than face expulsion, the U.S. Senate is responding to an institutional imperative to protect itself. The Senate Ethics Committee's unanimous recommendation that the Oregon Republican be expelled was the most severe penalty at its disposal. It represented a decision to avoid lurid public hearings reminiscent of the Clarence Thomas-Anita Hill spectacle that elevated sexual harassment tothe highest rung of politically incorrect behavior.
NEWS
By Susan Baer and Susan Baer,Washington Bureau of The Sun | September 8, 1995
WASHINGTON -- When it was finally over -- when Sen. Bob Packwood gave in to what even his supporters thought was inevitable and resigned yesterday -- there was no more invective, no more accusations, no more talk of misconduct and lying and (( abuse.Instead, the Oregon Republican, his voice trembling as he announced his resignation on the Senate floor, received a string of emotional tributes as colleagues faced the reality of all but expelling one of their own."I cannot bring myself to say his departure is welcome," said Republican Sen. John McCain of Arizona.
NEWS
August 20, 1995
Arts and the CityAs president of The Contemporary, I was delighted to see two recent editorial page articles emphasizing the importance of the arts to Baltimore's development. However, the article contained some inaccuracies and omissions.The first article by Glenn McNatt appeared on July 29 and an editorial about the Maryland Historical Society appeared on Aug. 1. The McNatt article mentioned ''arts institutions large and small.''The Contemporary is one of the small institutions, a five-year-old museum which presents exhibits in temporary spaces, a practice which has received major national attention, but which makes it difficult to achieve local name recognition.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | August 2, 1994
WASHINGTON -- Republican leaders denounced the Democratic approach to health reform last night in a nationally televised policy forum amid an intense behind-the-scenes debate over what strategy the GOP should pursue on the issue that now dominates the national political landscape.The hourlong program, carried live by C-Span and various satellite hookups, was heralded as an attempt to show Americans that the GOP has its own solution to the nation's health care problems.Most of the time was spent depicting what the Republicans say the nation has to fear from the remedies proposed by President Clinton and congressional Democrats.
NEWS
By JACK GERMOND & JULES WITCOVER | August 18, 1995
WASHINGTON -- Fighting to salvage a political career that is probably beyond salvation, Sen. Bob Packwood is having it both ways.With the approval of his Republican colleagues in the Senate, Packwood is avoiding public hearings at which the details of the charges of sexual misconduct against him might be spelled out by the women who have raised them. At the same time, the Oregon senator is using his position to conduct a public rebuttal of those undetailed charges in television and newspaper interviews.
NEWS
August 11, 1995
Excruciating is the word for the Senate Ethics Committee as it contemplates the fallout of its party-line tie vote not to hold public hearings on sexual misconduct and abuse of office charges against Sen. Bob Packwood. It now must decide whether to censure the Oregon Republican, strip him of his chairmanship of the powerful Senate Finance Committee or expel him from its ranks.Republican senators who went to the mat for a colleague now find themselves under pressure to select a severe form of punishment.
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