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By RASHOD D. OLLISON | November 24, 2005
There are certain artists I can't listen to while driving. Their music snatches my mind and spirit, leaving me unable to focus on the task at hand. So to prevent a wreck, I must keep their CDs at home. These musical sorcerers in clude the recently departed Shirley Horn, whose dreamy, medita tive style takes me to a delicious place where objects float and time is nonexistent. And there's Nina Simone, soul's high priest ess, who casts a spell so strong I don't move till the song is done. Bob Marley, reggae's celebrated poet-prophet, is another artist whose music kidnaps me. I must admit: I've never really dug too deeply into the genre and its vari ous offspring: dancehall, dub, soca, reggaeton.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | August 19, 2014
When Center Stage announced its 2014-2015 season months ago, there was one TBA on the schedule. The company announced Tuesday that the missing piece is the world premiere of "Marley," a musical about the Jamaican reggae sensation Bob Marley, written and directed by company artistic director Kwame Kwei-Armah. The new work, with a score comprised of Marley's music, will close the Center Stage season, running May 6 to June 14, 2015. "This will not be a jukebox musical," Kwei-Armah said.
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FEATURES
February 14, 2001
"Bob Marley: Rebel Music," a documentary on the reggae star from PBS' esteemed "American Masters" biography franchise, proves that even great series sometimes make less-than-great films. "Rebel Music" is one of the more questionable calls from "American Masters" - starting with the fact that Marley isn't American. In an interview last fall, executive producer Susan Lacy acknowledged that but countered by noting Marley's influence on American culture. True enough. But Joe Stalin and Nikita Khrushchev had a great influence on American culture, too, and I don't think anyone wants to claim them as American Masters.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Karen Nitkin and Karen Nitkin,special to the sun | November 23, 2006
At Ras Doobie de Chef, a colorful little Jamaican restaurant serving sunshine-and-sea-air favorites such as plantains, curried goat and jerk chicken, Bob Marley is announcing to all within earshot that he wants to love them and treat them right. Reggae music fits the mood of Ras Doobie, a happy cafe with walls painted in bright island colors. The restaurant promises to "sweet ya soul," and it delivers on that promise. Poor:]
NEWS
By Stephen G. Henderson and Stephen G. Henderson,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 15, 2003
KINGSTON, Jamaica - It is midmorning on a Monday in Kingston. There'd been rain earlier, so in a neighborhood called Trench Town, where Kingston's poorest residents live, the unpaved streets resemble butterscotch pudding. Goats rummage through piles of moldering trash. A half-naked woman shuffles by, her head wrapped in a bandana imprinted with a design of $100 bills. Leaning against a half-fallen cinder-block wall, teen-age boys loiter, drinking beer and passing around a marijuana cigar.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Karen Nitkin and Karen Nitkin,special to the sun | November 23, 2006
At Ras Doobie de Chef, a colorful little Jamaican restaurant serving sunshine-and-sea-air favorites such as plantains, curried goat and jerk chicken, Bob Marley is announcing to all within earshot that he wants to love them and treat them right. Reggae music fits the mood of Ras Doobie, a happy cafe with walls painted in bright island colors. The restaurant promises to "sweet ya soul," and it delivers on that promise. Poor:]
ENTERTAINMENT
By Kim Hart | April 21, 2005
Bob Marley's sons come to the Funk Box Damian "Jr. Gong" Marley, son of reggae icon Bob Marley, brings his Grammy Award-winning sound to the Funk Box tomorrow as part of a national tour to support his new hit single "Welcome to Jamrock." Stephen Marley, Damian's brother, will also make an appearance at the show, where they will celebrate their Jamaican roots. Jah Works, a local reggae band infused with elements of hip-hop, R&B and rock, will open for the Marley brothers. Doors open at 8 p.m., and the show begins at 9 p.m. tomorrow at the Funk Box, 10 E. Cross St. Tickets are $20. Call 410-625-2000 or visit www.the funkbox.
NEWS
By ERIC R. DANTON and ERIC R. DANTON,HARTFORD COURANT | December 18, 2005
For a long time after the death of her son, Voletta Wallace lost her identity. "I didn't even know if I had a name," she says. "I was just Biggie's mom." Biggie, of course, was Notorious B.I.G., the iconic rapper killed in Los Angeles in a 1997 shooting incident that has never been solved. Now, more than eight years later, Wallace has reclaimed herself with a book, Biggie: Voletta Wallace Remembers Her Son, Christopher Wallace, aka Notorious B.I.G., and a promotional tour for a new album of duets featuring Biggie juxtaposed with a slew of the rap world's biggest stars.
NEWS
June 29, 2002
Timothy White, 50, the influential editor in chief of the music trade publication Billboard, died in New York after suffering an apparent heart attack Thursday. Mr. White was a veteran music journalist who spent several years at Rolling Stone magazine. He wrote an acclaimed biography of reggae singer Bob Marley and had a syndicated radio series. Mr. White got his start as a reporter for the Associated Press. Anthony DeCurtis, a contributing editor at Rolling Stone, said Mr. White redefined Billboard during his 11 years as its editor by implementing colorful writing and accurate chart data.
NEWS
May 6, 2004
Homer Avila, 48, a dancer and choreographer who went on to a new career in dance after the amputation of his cancerous right leg and hip, died April 27 in New York from cancer that had spread to his lungs, a friend said. Until the amputation in 2001, Mr. Avila was known best for work with Avila/Weeks Dance, a modern-dance company he directed with Edisa Weeks. He also performed with Twyla Tharp, Mark Morris, Ralph Lemon and the Bill T. Jones/Arnie Zane Dance Company. Mr. Avila's disease was diagnosed as a rare form of cancer called chondrosarcoma, an illness that had gone undetected, he said, because he could not afford health insurance.
NEWS
By ERIC R. DANTON and ERIC R. DANTON,HARTFORD COURANT | December 18, 2005
For a long time after the death of her son, Voletta Wallace lost her identity. "I didn't even know if I had a name," she says. "I was just Biggie's mom." Biggie, of course, was Notorious B.I.G., the iconic rapper killed in Los Angeles in a 1997 shooting incident that has never been solved. Now, more than eight years later, Wallace has reclaimed herself with a book, Biggie: Voletta Wallace Remembers Her Son, Christopher Wallace, aka Notorious B.I.G., and a promotional tour for a new album of duets featuring Biggie juxtaposed with a slew of the rap world's biggest stars.
ENTERTAINMENT
By RASHOD D. OLLISON | November 24, 2005
There are certain artists I can't listen to while driving. Their music snatches my mind and spirit, leaving me unable to focus on the task at hand. So to prevent a wreck, I must keep their CDs at home. These musical sorcerers in clude the recently departed Shirley Horn, whose dreamy, medita tive style takes me to a delicious place where objects float and time is nonexistent. And there's Nina Simone, soul's high priest ess, who casts a spell so strong I don't move till the song is done. Bob Marley, reggae's celebrated poet-prophet, is another artist whose music kidnaps me. I must admit: I've never really dug too deeply into the genre and its vari ous offspring: dancehall, dub, soca, reggaeton.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Kim Hart | April 21, 2005
Bob Marley's sons come to the Funk Box Damian "Jr. Gong" Marley, son of reggae icon Bob Marley, brings his Grammy Award-winning sound to the Funk Box tomorrow as part of a national tour to support his new hit single "Welcome to Jamrock." Stephen Marley, Damian's brother, will also make an appearance at the show, where they will celebrate their Jamaican roots. Jah Works, a local reggae band infused with elements of hip-hop, R&B and rock, will open for the Marley brothers. Doors open at 8 p.m., and the show begins at 9 p.m. tomorrow at the Funk Box, 10 E. Cross St. Tickets are $20. Call 410-625-2000 or visit www.the funkbox.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Rashod D. Ollison and Rashod D. Ollison,Sun Pop Music Critic | January 6, 2005
Every year, I look forward to the gems record companies unearth from their vaults just as much as I anticipate new releases. Sometimes, depending on the climate in pop, I'm more excited about the reissued stuff. But 2004 wasn't so bad. We got great singles from Usher, Lil' Jon and Kanye West, marvelous albums by Loretta Lynn, Martin Luther and the Beastie Boys. We also got a chance to rediscover some forgotten classics in gloriously remastered sound. And in some cases, we were introduced to vintage material that had stayed in the can for decades.
NEWS
May 6, 2004
Homer Avila, 48, a dancer and choreographer who went on to a new career in dance after the amputation of his cancerous right leg and hip, died April 27 in New York from cancer that had spread to his lungs, a friend said. Until the amputation in 2001, Mr. Avila was known best for work with Avila/Weeks Dance, a modern-dance company he directed with Edisa Weeks. He also performed with Twyla Tharp, Mark Morris, Ralph Lemon and the Bill T. Jones/Arnie Zane Dance Company. Mr. Avila's disease was diagnosed as a rare form of cancer called chondrosarcoma, an illness that had gone undetected, he said, because he could not afford health insurance.
FEATURES
By Rashod D. Ollison and Rashod D. Ollison,SUN POP MUSIC CRITIC | May 1, 2003
Natalie Stewart sighs heavily into the phone. She doesn't feel like talking. She's in a hotel room in North Carolina somewhere - Raleigh, she thinks. Her partner, Marsha Ambrosius, is in the next room and refuses to talk. Since last August, the two, collectively known as Floetry, have been on the road performing songs and poetry they've written together. The cities, the clubs, the people - everything's a blur. For the past two months, the pair have been steaming up urban radio with the sexy "Say Yes."
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | June 28, 2002
Stepping Razor: Red X, the Canadian Academy Award-nominated documentary from 1992 that combines a portrait of reggae great Peter Tosh with an investigation into his September 1987 murder, receives a rare screening tomorrow at 8 p.m. at the Heritage Cinema House, 19 E. North Ave. (between Charles and St. Paul streets), followed by a reggae dance party with Junior Marvin (former lead guitarist with Bob Marley and the Wailers) and Strykers Posse at 10 p.m. Americans have used reggae as good-time music for so long that it's useful to remember its pungent youth.
FEATURES
By J. D. Considine and J. D. Considine,Sun Pop Music Critic | August 27, 1991
Queen Latifah had it right. Noting that not all the fans at the Merriweather Post Pavilion had accepted her invitation to "Dance for Me," she turned to the audience and said, "You paid all that money to get in, and now you're just going to sit there?"She had a right to be incredulous, too, given the talent on hand. Before her performance, the still-gathering crowd basked in the booming, house-style sound of Crystal Waters; then, once the Queen had her say, it would be time for Ziggy Marley and the Melody Makers' state-of-the-groove reggae.
NEWS
By Stephen G. Henderson and Stephen G. Henderson,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 15, 2003
KINGSTON, Jamaica - It is midmorning on a Monday in Kingston. There'd been rain earlier, so in a neighborhood called Trench Town, where Kingston's poorest residents live, the unpaved streets resemble butterscotch pudding. Goats rummage through piles of moldering trash. A half-naked woman shuffles by, her head wrapped in a bandana imprinted with a design of $100 bills. Leaning against a half-fallen cinder-block wall, teen-age boys loiter, drinking beer and passing around a marijuana cigar.
NEWS
June 29, 2002
Timothy White, 50, the influential editor in chief of the music trade publication Billboard, died in New York after suffering an apparent heart attack Thursday. Mr. White was a veteran music journalist who spent several years at Rolling Stone magazine. He wrote an acclaimed biography of reggae singer Bob Marley and had a syndicated radio series. Mr. White got his start as a reporter for the Associated Press. Anthony DeCurtis, a contributing editor at Rolling Stone, said Mr. White redefined Billboard during his 11 years as its editor by implementing colorful writing and accurate chart data.
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