Advertisement
HomeCollectionsBob Ley
IN THE NEWS

Bob Ley

FEATURED ARTICLES
SPORTS
By RAY FRAGER | January 23, 2006
Don't expect Bill Walton and Steve "Snapper" Jones to go easy on anyone when they're calling NBA games. Toward the end of yesterday's dreadful first half in the Timberwolves-Sixers telecast on ABC, Walton took note of one Philadelphia player's non-effort and said: "Chris Webber, please, the game started at noon." Walton soon added sarcastically: "Put this first half in a time capsule." To which play-by-play man Brent Musburger tacked on: "And bury it forever." During a discussion about the possible trade of Pacers malcontent Ron Artest, Jones said: "Ron Artest is not at an All-Star level.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | September 20, 2014
  You can only shake your head in wonderment at cable TV when an ESPN show host gets it wrong as to what's in an investigative report that his own channel just published. And worse, it's on one of the biggest stories in the history of professional sports. That happened with Bob Ley on ESPN yesterday as he reported the results of a probe by the channel's "Outside the Lines" team into the Ray Rice elevator attack on his then-fiancée and what is looking more each day like a cover-up on the part of the NFL and the Baltimore Ravens.
Advertisement
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | September 20, 2014
  You can only shake your head in wonderment at cable TV when an ESPN show host gets it wrong as to what's in an investigative report that his own channel just published. And worse, it's on one of the biggest stories in the history of professional sports. That happened with Bob Ley on ESPN yesterday as he reported the results of a probe by the channel's "Outside the Lines" team into the Ray Rice elevator attack on his then-fiancée and what is looking more each day like a cover-up on the part of the NFL and the Baltimore Ravens.
SPORTS
By Matt Vensel | June 10, 2011
Dallas Mavericks guard DeShawn Stevenson has engaged Miami Heat forward LeBron James in a war of words during the NBA Finals, bringing back memories of when Stevenson was with the Wizards and James was still in Cleveland. Reminiscing about that beef on Thursday’s “Outside the Lines,” ESPN’s Bob Ley recited the first verse of "Blow the Whistle," a Stevenson diss that LeBron’s buddy Jay-Z wrote in 2008 -- including the line, "When you talking to a don, please have respect like you're talking to your mom. " Listening to the stoic sportscaster read Jay-Z lyrics might not be for you, but I thoroughly enjoyed it .
SPORTS
By Matt Vensel | June 10, 2011
Dallas Mavericks guard DeShawn Stevenson has engaged Miami Heat forward LeBron James in a war of words during the NBA Finals, bringing back memories of when Stevenson was with the Wizards and James was still in Cleveland. Reminiscing about that beef on Thursday’s “Outside the Lines,” ESPN’s Bob Ley recited the first verse of "Blow the Whistle," a Stevenson diss that LeBron’s buddy Jay-Z wrote in 2008 -- including the line, "When you talking to a don, please have respect like you're talking to your mom. " Listening to the stoic sportscaster read Jay-Z lyrics might not be for you, but I thoroughly enjoyed it .
SPORTS
By Charles Chandler and Charles Chandler,Knight-Ridder | June 19, 1992
CHARLOTTE, N.C. -- Former North Carolina State basketball coach Jim Valvano has been diagnosed as having cancer in his back.Valvano, now a television analyst with ABC and ESPN, has not felt well for more than a month and has been undergoing tests in Raleigh, said his agent, Art Kaminsky.Kaminsky said that Valvano was given the diagnosis this week but that the extent of the illness had not been determined."It's serious, I won't deny that, but there are many details we don't know yet," Kaminsky said.
SPORTS
By RAY FRAGER | June 17, 1994
Did you suspect soccer was un-American? If so, here's your proof: no commercials.That's right, the World Cup will be televised commercial-free on ABC, ESPN and ESPN2. When they kick the ball off -- some kickoff, they don't even use a tee -- to start each half, there will be no scheduled commercial breaks until the end of the half.What kind of television is this? We all know that only PBS goes without commercials. And we've all known for a long time just how un-American those people are.How am I expected to watch this?
SPORTS
By Knight-Ridder News Service | June 19, 1992
CHARLOTTE, N.C. -- Former North Carolina State basketball coach Jim Valvano has cancer in his back.Valvano, now a television analyst with ABC and ESPN, has not felt well for more than a month and has been undergoing tests in Raleigh, his agent, Art Kaminsky, said.Kaminsky said that Valvano was given the diagnosis this week but that the extent of the illness had not been determined."It's serious, I won't deny that, but there are many details we don't know yet," Kaminsky said.Valvano, 46, who was unavailable for comment, will have tests in Raleigh today and will go to the Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center in New York next week for extensive testing.
SPORTS
By Milton Kent | November 9, 1995
Here's today's little-known fact: Bryant Gumbel was nearly an employee of this newspaper's sports section.That's right, the ultra-cool host of NBC's "Today" show, which visited Charm City yesterday, was nearly an ink-stained wretch on these very pages.It seems that former Sun sports editor Bob Maisel offered the young Gumbel a job here in 1972. But while Gumbel was mulling over the offer, his father died. In the succeeding period, Gumbel, who had been writing sports in his native Chicago, got a broadcast audition.
SPORTS
By MILTON KENT | September 7, 1994
There's a reason why it appears from time to time that ESPN's Dan Patrick and Keith Olbermann are talking right past you on the 11 p.m. "SportsCenter."They are.Quite frankly, there are infrequent moments where a reference from a production meeting or a conversation will creep into Olbermann's or Patrick's copy and into your living room, and either you'll get it or you won't.Even if you don't get that joke, just wait awhile, for there'll be another one coming right around the bend shortly.
SPORTS
By RAY FRAGER | January 23, 2006
Don't expect Bill Walton and Steve "Snapper" Jones to go easy on anyone when they're calling NBA games. Toward the end of yesterday's dreadful first half in the Timberwolves-Sixers telecast on ABC, Walton took note of one Philadelphia player's non-effort and said: "Chris Webber, please, the game started at noon." Walton soon added sarcastically: "Put this first half in a time capsule." To which play-by-play man Brent Musburger tacked on: "And bury it forever." During a discussion about the possible trade of Pacers malcontent Ron Artest, Jones said: "Ron Artest is not at an All-Star level.
SPORTS
By MILTON KENT | September 15, 1994
Baltimore's impending network affiliate swap claims its first sports casualty this weekend. Channel 11 has opted not to carry CBS' coverage of the inaugural Presidents Cup golf tournament from Lake Manassas, Va.The tournament, which is similar to the Ryder Cup, will feature 12 of the best players from the United States against 12 players from around the world in match-play competition, and should make for fascinating viewing.But you'll need a TV set that can pick up Washington's Channel 9 to get Saturday (3 p.m.)
SPORTS
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Television Critic | August 28, 1992
There weren't a lot of them, but the pictures and words about Baltimore that ESPN did telecast to the rest of the country last night were good ones. They certainly couldn't do anything but enhance the city's image nationally in its bid for an NFL expansion team.During "SportsCenter" and the "NFL Pre-game Show," anchors Bob Ley and Chris Berman kept referring fondly to Memorial Stadium as the "Old Horseshoe," as though they were talking about Yankee Stadium or the Polo Grounds. The sense of the term and its delivery by the announcers was that Baltimore is a city with a rich sports tradition.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.