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Bob Keeshan

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By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | January 24, 2004
Bob Keeshan, who for 30 years played television's Captain Kangaroo, trading knock-knock jokes with a moose puppet while introducing morals and civility to countless children, died yesterday at 76. Mr. Keeshan's death in Hartford, Vt., followed a long illness, according to a statement released by his son, Michael. Although Fred Rogers, who died last year, is often considered the father of children's television, Mr. Keeshan preceded him on U.S. national TV by 13 years, debuting on CBS in 1955 as an avuncular character with a walrus mustache, Buster Brown wig, baggy jacket and beloved gaggle of Treasure House friends.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Sun Television Critic | February 1, 2004
Boohbah. A sneeze? A new Winnie-the-Pooh character? Neither. But those two silly-sounding syllables just may form one of the most important new words learned this year by parents of preschool children. Boohbah is the newest variation in television fare for kids. Created by Anne Wood, the controversial mastermind behind the phenomenally successful television show Teletubbies, the new PBS program is available in 99 million homes. Remember Teletubbies? It's the show criticized because it featured fuzzy little creatures with TV sets inserted into their stomachs.
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NEWS
By Dan Morse and Dan Morse,SUN STAFF | May 26, 1996
A retired general, as in Powell, and a retired captain, as in Kangaroo, were among the commencement speakers yesterday as more than 1,700 graduates received degrees at five Maryland colleges."
FEATURES
By Stephanie Shapiro and Stephanie Shapiro,SUN STAFF | January 24, 2004
I remember my early childhood in black and white. Maybe it's because I'm a baby boomer who watched a lot of television. That's why when I think about Captain Kangaroo and his bristly mustache, his Treasure House set, his friends Bunny Rabbit and Mr. Green Jeans, I see it all in black and white. By the time color television was commonplace, I had pretty much stopped watching. But those grainy memories of perching daily before the glowing screen in the mid-to-late 1950s are woven into the fabric of my life.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Lori Sears | October 31, 1996
Captain KangarooMeet the man who brightened your mornings with his cheerful personalities and characters. Bob Keeshan, better known as "Captain Kangaroo," is coming to Borders Books & Music on Sunday to sign copies of his new book, "Good Morning Captain: 50 Wonderful Years With Bob Keeshan, TV's Captain Kangaroo."The Captain brought characters such as Bunny Rabbit, Mister Moose and Grandfather Clock to generations of children. His book offers an extensive photo history and intimate look at the career of the man behind the Captain.
FEATURES
By Stephanie Shapiro and Stephanie Shapiro,SUN STAFF | January 24, 2004
I remember my early childhood in black and white. Maybe it's because I'm a baby boomer who watched a lot of television. That's why when I think about Captain Kangaroo and his bristly mustache, his Treasure House set, his friends Bunny Rabbit and Mr. Green Jeans, I see it all in black and white. By the time color television was commonplace, I had pretty much stopped watching. But those grainy memories of perching daily before the glowing screen in the mid-to-late 1950s are woven into the fabric of my life.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Sun Television Critic | February 1, 2004
Boohbah. A sneeze? A new Winnie-the-Pooh character? Neither. But those two silly-sounding syllables just may form one of the most important new words learned this year by parents of preschool children. Boohbah is the newest variation in television fare for kids. Created by Anne Wood, the controversial mastermind behind the phenomenally successful television show Teletubbies, the new PBS program is available in 99 million homes. Remember Teletubbies? It's the show criticized because it featured fuzzy little creatures with TV sets inserted into their stomachs.
NEWS
By Sheridan Lyons and Sheridan Lyons,SUN STAFF | September 27, 1996
Bob Keeshan, television's veteran Captain Kangaroo, returns to Western Maryland College tomorrow for a speech of the millennium.It's part of "A Day of Illumination" at the campus and the kickoff of a $40 million fund-raising drive to the year 2000. The day concludes with Carroll County's first laser show.Keeshan's address, "Defining Lessons," will be at 2 p.m. in Baker Memorial Chapel. Programs on technology and education will follow in the academic buildings. The laser show will be in the Gill Center at 8: 45 p.m. The events are free.
FEATURES
By John Barry and John Barry,Knight-Ridder News Service | October 12, 1994
The generation that Captain Kangaroo taught self-respect and empathy has let the big guy down.Thirty-nine years after Bob Keeshan brought his famous gentle whimsy to CBS -- imparting values of trust and mutual caring and affection through his associations with Bunny Rabbit and Mr. Green Jeans -- the Captain is shocked at how things have turned out. The generation he nurtured has not done nearly as well by its own progeny.In much the same terms expressed lately by disheartened baby-care guru Dr. Benjamin Spock, Mr. Keeshan says he sees American children as worse off today than they were when he debuted as Captain Kangaroo in 1955.
FEATURES
By Suzanna Stephens and Suzanna Stephens,Contributing Writer | March 3, 1995
Bob Keeshan will bring his brand of childhood magic to Maryland this weekend as he visits two Zany Brainy bookstores to sign copies of his "Family Fun Activity Book.Filled with suggestions on creative family play, the book's activities are largely derived from the playful fun of Mr. Keeshan's children's television show. He was the master of make-believe on "Captain Kangaroo" for 36 years.Mr. Keeshan wrote the book as a reference for games and activities that families can enjoy together, including clay craft projects, papier-mache planet projects, toilet paper body-wrapping races and giant milk-carton dice games."
NEWS
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | January 24, 2004
Bob Keeshan, who for 30 years played television's Captain Kangaroo, trading knock-knock jokes with a moose puppet while introducing morals and civility to countless children, died yesterday at 76. Mr. Keeshan's death in Hartford, Vt., followed a long illness, according to a statement released by his son, Michael. Although Fred Rogers, who died last year, is often considered the father of children's television, Mr. Keeshan preceded him on U.S. national TV by 13 years, debuting on CBS in 1955 as an avuncular character with a walrus mustache, Buster Brown wig, baggy jacket and beloved gaggle of Treasure House friends.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Lori Sears | October 31, 1996
Captain KangarooMeet the man who brightened your mornings with his cheerful personalities and characters. Bob Keeshan, better known as "Captain Kangaroo," is coming to Borders Books & Music on Sunday to sign copies of his new book, "Good Morning Captain: 50 Wonderful Years With Bob Keeshan, TV's Captain Kangaroo."The Captain brought characters such as Bunny Rabbit, Mister Moose and Grandfather Clock to generations of children. His book offers an extensive photo history and intimate look at the career of the man behind the Captain.
NEWS
By Sheridan Lyons and Sheridan Lyons,SUN STAFF | September 27, 1996
Bob Keeshan, television's veteran Captain Kangaroo, returns to Western Maryland College tomorrow for a speech of the millennium.It's part of "A Day of Illumination" at the campus and the kickoff of a $40 million fund-raising drive to the year 2000. The day concludes with Carroll County's first laser show.Keeshan's address, "Defining Lessons," will be at 2 p.m. in Baker Memorial Chapel. Programs on technology and education will follow in the academic buildings. The laser show will be in the Gill Center at 8: 45 p.m. The events are free.
NEWS
By Dan Morse and Dan Morse,SUN STAFF | May 26, 1996
A retired general, as in Powell, and a retired captain, as in Kangaroo, were among the commencement speakers yesterday as more than 1,700 graduates received degrees at five Maryland colleges."
FEATURES
By David Bianculli and David Bianculli,Special to The Sun | December 5, 1994
A lot of unusual stuff is appearing on TV tonight. Comedians guest-star as homeless people on two CBS sitcoms, while a CBS series canceled after a single outing returns, with a handful of never-seen episodes, on VH1.* "White Christmas" (8:30-11 p.m., Channel 2) -- Bing Crosby and Danny Kaye star with "sister act" Rosemary Clooney and Vera-Ellen in this 1954 classic, a distant echo of the movie "Holiday Inn," which in 1942 featured Irving Berlin's song "White Christmas." The patter is witty, the dance numbers are glamorous and rich with color, and the big show the boys put together for their old general just might bring a tear to your eye. OK, it's sappy, but that's part of the fun. NBC.* "Dave's World" (8:30-9 p.m., Channel 11)
NEWS
May 19, 1996
America's favorite captain of the airwaves, Bob Keeshan, better known as Captain Kangaroo, will be among the guests honored at Western Maryland College's 126th commencement at 2 p.m. Saturday at the Gill Physical Education Learning Center.Known simply as "the Captain" to millions of baby boomers who grew up with his daily show for children, Keeshan will be joined by television journalist Roger Mudd as they receive honorary degrees in recognition of their contributions to society.Keeshan, also known for creating Clarabell the Clown on "Howdy Doody" and playing the role from 1948 to 1953, opened the doors to his Treasure House as Captain Kangaroo on CBS-TV in 1955.
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