Advertisement
HomeCollectionsBob Graham
IN THE NEWS

Bob Graham

FIND MORE STORIES ABOUT:
FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
November 5, 1991
"Black Images in the Media," a forum on coverage of the black community, with a panel of news executives and community leaders, will be held Nov. 13 from 7 to 10 p.m. at Morgan State University.For more information, call Len Lazarick, 337-2442, or Bob Graham, 879-1710.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | March 27, 2004
WASHINGTON - Sen. Bill Frist, the Republican majority leader, said yesterday that he wanted to compare Richard A. Clarke's recent testimony with secret testimony he gave two years ago while working for President Bush. Frist said it was "awesomely self-serving" for the former White House counter-terrorism chief to say that President Bush had paid too little attention to his warnings about the danger of al-Qaida terrorists. Far from accepting his own responsibility for any failures before the attacks, Clarke was "consumed by the desire to dodge any blame," even as rescuers were sifting through the rubble of the World Trade Center, Frist said in a speech on the Senate floor.
Advertisement
SPORTS
December 24, 1991
Senators Richard Lugar, R-Ind., and Bob Graham, D-Fla., have made a wager on the Sugar Bowl game between Notre Dame and Florida.Lugar has put up a case of Indiana-grown popcorn, and Graham is wagering a bushel of Florida oranges on his alma mater. The loser must deliver the goods to a soup kitchen for the hungry and homeless in Washington.The bet was made following a debate between the two senators over the merits of No. 18 Notre Dame (9-3) and No. 3 Florida (10-1).
NEWS
By Jules Witcover | October 13, 2003
WASHINGTON - When the Democratic presidential candidates gathered the other night in Phoenix for yet another debate, one of the strongest voices against President Bush's war in Iraq was missing. Sen. Bob Graham of Florida, short on campaign funds and charisma, had bowed out of the race a few days earlier. Old baseball manager Leo Durocher memorably observed that "nice guys finish last," and were he around today he could have had Mr. Graham in mind. For all the harshness of the mild-mannered Floridian's criticism, he could not compete with the aggressiveness of former Vermont Gov. Howard Dean for the support of anti-war, anti-Bush Democrats.
NEWS
October 15, 1991
Forty-one GOP senators support Clarence Thomas' confirmation for the Supreme Court. Only two, Sens. James Jeffords of Vermont and Bob Packwood of Oregon, have said they will not support him.These Democrats support Thomas: Sens. Sam Nunn and Wyche Fowler of Georgia, J. Bennett Johnston and John Breaux of Louisiana, Harry Reid and Richard Bryan of Nevada; Ernest F. Hollings of South Carolina, Dennis DeConcini of Arizona, Alan J. Dixon of Illinois, David Boren of Oklahoma, and Richard Shelby of Alabama.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | March 27, 2004
WASHINGTON - Sen. Bill Frist, the Republican majority leader, said yesterday that he wanted to compare Richard A. Clarke's recent testimony with secret testimony he gave two years ago while working for President Bush. Frist said it was "awesomely self-serving" for the former White House counter-terrorism chief to say that President Bush had paid too little attention to his warnings about the danger of al-Qaida terrorists. Far from accepting his own responsibility for any failures before the attacks, Clarke was "consumed by the desire to dodge any blame," even as rescuers were sifting through the rubble of the World Trade Center, Frist said in a speech on the Senate floor.
NEWS
By Gwyneth K. Shaw and Maya Bell and Gwyneth K. Shaw and Maya Bell,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 24, 2002
WASHINGTON - U.S. Sen. Bob Graham, elder statesman of Florida's Democrats, said yesterday that he is "seriously considering" running for president in 2004. Graham said that as his misgivings about national security and the flagging economy grew a year ago, he began seriously contemplating seeking his party's nomination. "I've become increasingly concerned about the way the war of terror is being conducted and the lack of ideas of what to do with our economy," he told reporters in his Miami office.
NEWS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | May 26, 2001
WASHINGTON - A congressman who reviewed video and audiotapes of the Peruvian downing of a missionaries' plane with one of the survivors said yesterday that he was "disturbed" by the "lack of professionalism and chaos" that marked the incident. "This wasn't even a close call - there was no reason to shoot down that plane," said Rep. Peter Hoekstra, a Michigan Republican who listened to the tapes this week with Jim Bowers, a Baptist missionary whose wife, Roni, and infant daughter, Charity, were killed in the April 20 attack over Peru.
NEWS
By Jules Witcover | April 21, 2003
MANCHESTER, N.H. -- Sen. Bob Graham of Florida, launching his campaign for New Hampshire's January presidential primary, strolled up Elm Street the other day, the traditional route of candidates courting the state's politics-hardened voters. A small gaggle of reporters and television cameramen, mostly from Florida, tagged behind as he leisurely introduced himself to pedestrians, many of whom had never heard of him. Then he entered the Merrimack Restaurant, the walls of which are covered with snapshots of many past winners and losers.
NEWS
By Jules Witcover | July 21, 2003
WASHINGTON - In the increasingly active competition to separate the sheep from the goats among the field of nine Democratic presidential aspirants, the device of the presidential forum is running amok. Scarcely a week seems to go by these days when all or most of the White House hopefuls don't gather before this or that special interest group to peddle their political wares in search of an edge that will help them stand out from the pack. The latest was a voters' bazaar before members of the Human Rights Campaign, the most prominent advocate of, as they identify their cause, "gay, lesbian, bisexual and transgender rights."
NEWS
By Jules Witcover | July 21, 2003
WASHINGTON - In the increasingly active competition to separate the sheep from the goats among the field of nine Democratic presidential aspirants, the device of the presidential forum is running amok. Scarcely a week seems to go by these days when all or most of the White House hopefuls don't gather before this or that special interest group to peddle their political wares in search of an edge that will help them stand out from the pack. The latest was a voters' bazaar before members of the Human Rights Campaign, the most prominent advocate of, as they identify their cause, "gay, lesbian, bisexual and transgender rights."
NEWS
By Jules Witcover | July 9, 2003
WASHINGTON - The most prominent 5-4 split in Washington continues to be the one on the Supreme Court that delivered the presidency to George W. Bush and has decided many other (though, recently, not all) major issues in favor of the conservative bloc on the court. But another significant 5-4 split exists on the political scene. Five of the Democratic presidential candidates for 2004 - Florida Sen. Bob Graham (who voted against Mr. Bush's use-of-force resolution), former Vermont Gov. Howard Dean, Rep. Dennis Kucinich of Ohio, former Sen. Carol Moseley Braun of Illinois and the Rev. Al Sharpton - all opposed the invasion of Iraq.
NEWS
By Jules Witcover | May 12, 2003
WASHINGTON - At St. Anselm College in New Hampshire the other day, White House political strategist Karl Rove was asked by a student how the war in Iraq could be justified when the principal rationale for it, possession of weapons of mass destruction, had not yet been found. Mr. Rove corrected him. "First of all, it's the battle of Iraq, not the war," he said. The invasion, in other words, was just a part of the war on terrorism declared by President Bush after 9/11. In making this "correction," Mr. Rove was merely following the script of his boss in his elaborately staged victory speech on the deck of the USS Abraham Lincoln at sea 30 miles off the coast of California, within easy reach of the helicopter he didn't take to get aboard.
NEWS
By Jules Witcover | April 21, 2003
MANCHESTER, N.H. -- Sen. Bob Graham of Florida, launching his campaign for New Hampshire's January presidential primary, strolled up Elm Street the other day, the traditional route of candidates courting the state's politics-hardened voters. A small gaggle of reporters and television cameramen, mostly from Florida, tagged behind as he leisurely introduced himself to pedestrians, many of whom had never heard of him. Then he entered the Merrimack Restaurant, the walls of which are covered with snapshots of many past winners and losers.
NEWS
By Gwyneth K. Shaw and Maya Bell and Gwyneth K. Shaw and Maya Bell,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 24, 2002
WASHINGTON - U.S. Sen. Bob Graham, elder statesman of Florida's Democrats, said yesterday that he is "seriously considering" running for president in 2004. Graham said that as his misgivings about national security and the flagging economy grew a year ago, he began seriously contemplating seeking his party's nomination. "I've become increasingly concerned about the way the war of terror is being conducted and the lack of ideas of what to do with our economy," he told reporters in his Miami office.
NEWS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | May 26, 2001
WASHINGTON - A congressman who reviewed video and audiotapes of the Peruvian downing of a missionaries' plane with one of the survivors said yesterday that he was "disturbed" by the "lack of professionalism and chaos" that marked the incident. "This wasn't even a close call - there was no reason to shoot down that plane," said Rep. Peter Hoekstra, a Michigan Republican who listened to the tapes this week with Jim Bowers, a Baptist missionary whose wife, Roni, and infant daughter, Charity, were killed in the April 20 attack over Peru.
NEWS
By Jules Witcover | July 9, 2003
WASHINGTON - The most prominent 5-4 split in Washington continues to be the one on the Supreme Court that delivered the presidency to George W. Bush and has decided many other (though, recently, not all) major issues in favor of the conservative bloc on the court. But another significant 5-4 split exists on the political scene. Five of the Democratic presidential candidates for 2004 - Florida Sen. Bob Graham (who voted against Mr. Bush's use-of-force resolution), former Vermont Gov. Howard Dean, Rep. Dennis Kucinich of Ohio, former Sen. Carol Moseley Braun of Illinois and the Rev. Al Sharpton - all opposed the invasion of Iraq.
NEWS
By Jules Witcover | October 13, 2003
WASHINGTON - When the Democratic presidential candidates gathered the other night in Phoenix for yet another debate, one of the strongest voices against President Bush's war in Iraq was missing. Sen. Bob Graham of Florida, short on campaign funds and charisma, had bowed out of the race a few days earlier. Old baseball manager Leo Durocher memorably observed that "nice guys finish last," and were he around today he could have had Mr. Graham in mind. For all the harshness of the mild-mannered Floridian's criticism, he could not compete with the aggressiveness of former Vermont Gov. Howard Dean for the support of anti-war, anti-Bush Democrats.
SPORTS
December 24, 1991
Senators Richard Lugar, R-Ind., and Bob Graham, D-Fla., have made a wager on the Sugar Bowl game between Notre Dame and Florida.Lugar has put up a case of Indiana-grown popcorn, and Graham is wagering a bushel of Florida oranges on his alma mater. The loser must deliver the goods to a soup kitchen for the hungry and homeless in Washington.The bet was made following a debate between the two senators over the merits of No. 18 Notre Dame (9-3) and No. 3 Florida (10-1).
NEWS
November 5, 1991
"Black Images in the Media," a forum on coverage of the black community, with a panel of news executives and community leaders, will be held Nov. 13 from 7 to 10 p.m. at Morgan State University.For more information, call Len Lazarick, 337-2442, or Bob Graham, 879-1710.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.