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NEWS
December 5, 2012
Much ink has been spilled in recent weeks criticizing the Republican Party and its failed presidential candidate for a lack of compassion and obvious antipathy toward "47 percent" of the electorate (if not a bit more), so it was reassuring to see two of its more prominent leaders offer a message of inclusion and uplift at a Jack Kemp Foundation dinner on Tuesday. Too bad that on the same day, Republicans were reverting to form in the Senate chamber. There, the late Mr. Kemp's 1996 top-of-ticket running-mate, Bob Dole - recently released from hospital care and assisted by wheelchair - was unable to coax sufficient GOP support for what should have been a no-brainer for members of a truly compassionate party: the Convention on the Rights of Persons With Disabilities.
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NEWS
By Jules Witcover | December 20, 2013
 The famous Douglas MacArthur line that "old soldiers never die, they just fade away" certainly doesn't apply, not yet anyway, to World War II combat hero and later Republican presidential nominee Bob Dole. Now age 90 but still going strong, Mr. Dole was back on Capitol Hill the other night where he reigned in the 1980s and 1990s as Senate Republican leader. The occasion was the renaming of a school meals and education program linking him with the late George McGovern, his old Democratic foe but wholehearted partner in humanitarian endeavors.
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NEWS
By Cal Thomas | June 1, 2013
Who doesn't admire former Republican Senate Majority Leader Bob Dole? Wounded World War II veteran, part-time comedian (Mr. Dole once described a meeting of former presidents Carter, Ford and Nixon as "see no evil, hear no evil -- and evil"), former presidential candidate and all-around decent man, Mr. Dole was a part of government for much of his life. Therein lies the problem for some who stay in politics and government so long that it is easy to lose perspective and think cutting deals is more important than winning the argument.
NEWS
By John E. McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | August 28, 2013
Close attention to detail is a good thing in a copy editor. We want the text to be factually accurate, grammatical, and clear. But that attention to detail carries with it the hazard of becoming obsessed with trifles.  Take, for example, the "widow," a short line of only a couple of words at the top of a leg of type, or the "orphan," its counterpart at the bottom. The page would certainly look a little cleaner if the top and bottom of each leg of type filled out the line. But the amount of time involved in recasting sentences to eliminate widows an orphans can be counterproductive, not to mention the risk each editor takes of creating error when rewording text.  Some editors also spend their time pulling pieces of text from one line to the next.
NEWS
By Jonah Goldberg | June 3, 2013
"Could people like Bob Dole, even Ronald Reagan -- could you make it in today's Republican Party?" Chris Wallace of "Fox News Sunday" asked former Senate Majority Leader and 1996 GOP presidential nominee Bob Dole. "I doubt it," Mr. Dole replied. "Reagan wouldn't have made it. Certainly, Nixon couldn't have made it, because he had ideas and -- We might have made it, but I doubt it. " Let me state up front that I have incredible respect and admiration for Mr. Dole. He's an American hero and was a politician of undisputed integrity.
NEWS
By Jules Witcover | December 20, 2013
 The famous Douglas MacArthur line that "old soldiers never die, they just fade away" certainly doesn't apply, not yet anyway, to World War II combat hero and later Republican presidential nominee Bob Dole. Now age 90 but still going strong, Mr. Dole was back on Capitol Hill the other night where he reigned in the 1980s and 1990s as Senate Republican leader. The occasion was the renaming of a school meals and education program linking him with the late George McGovern, his old Democratic foe but wholehearted partner in humanitarian endeavors.
NEWS
April 11, 1995
"Doonesbury" cartoonist Garry Trudeau accused Sen. Bob Dole of invoking his war wounds in his presidential campaign. This prompted former Sen. Charles McC. Mathias, a frequent critic of Senator Dole's policies, to respond, "In the 35 years that we have known each other, and been in daily contact for much of that time, I have never seen Bob Dole attempt to exploit his scars of battle." Others who know Senator Dole say the same thing.But the senator's World War II heroism and suffering are in fact one of the distinguishing characteristics of his last presidential campaign, which he formally began yesterday.
NEWS
By Jack W. Germond & Jules Witcover | June 5, 1996
WASHINGTON -- Last summer, when Bob Dole was still hearing the heavy footsteps of conservative Sen. Phil Gramm behind him, he told a meeting of the Republican National Committee that "if that's what you want, I'll be another Ronald Reagan."Apparently many fellow Republicans do want their presumptive 1996 presidential nominee to be just that, urging him to propose a juicy tax cut in the fashion of the Great Communicator. Like Mr. Reagan in 1980, Mr. Dole is saying now that he can cut the deficit while cutting taxes, which Mr. Reagan failed spectacularly to do in his eight years as president.
NEWS
By THEO LIPPMAN JR | May 30, 1996
MAY 15. SEN. BOB DOLE announces he is resigning his Senate seat. He says, ''I will seek the presidency with nothing to fall back on but the judgment of the people of the United States, and nowhere to go but the White House or home.''May 16. Bob Dole, wearing an open-neck sports shirt, tieless, a powder-blue sports jacket and chinos, and tan tasseled loafers, tells a Chicago audience, ''It is good to be out of Washington, D.C.''June 10. Bob Dole, in blue jeans and T-shirt, announces in Russell, Kansas, that he has formally and officially quit the Senate.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | July 13, 1998
Former U.S. Sen. Bob Dole will deliver the keynote address at the July 23 dedication of Maryland's World War II memorial.Dole, who was wounded in combat during the war, will help dedicate a monument bearing the names of more than 6,000 Marylanders killed in the war. The dedication will be marked by a flyover of modern and vintage military aircraft and music by the Naval Academy Band.The ceremony will start at 10 a.m. at the memorial site, Route 450 at the Severn River.Information: 410-576-6179.
NEWS
By Jonah Goldberg | June 3, 2013
"Could people like Bob Dole, even Ronald Reagan -- could you make it in today's Republican Party?" Chris Wallace of "Fox News Sunday" asked former Senate Majority Leader and 1996 GOP presidential nominee Bob Dole. "I doubt it," Mr. Dole replied. "Reagan wouldn't have made it. Certainly, Nixon couldn't have made it, because he had ideas and -- We might have made it, but I doubt it. " Let me state up front that I have incredible respect and admiration for Mr. Dole. He's an American hero and was a politician of undisputed integrity.
NEWS
By Cal Thomas | June 1, 2013
Who doesn't admire former Republican Senate Majority Leader Bob Dole? Wounded World War II veteran, part-time comedian (Mr. Dole once described a meeting of former presidents Carter, Ford and Nixon as "see no evil, hear no evil -- and evil"), former presidential candidate and all-around decent man, Mr. Dole was a part of government for much of his life. Therein lies the problem for some who stay in politics and government so long that it is easy to lose perspective and think cutting deals is more important than winning the argument.
NEWS
December 5, 2012
Much ink has been spilled in recent weeks criticizing the Republican Party and its failed presidential candidate for a lack of compassion and obvious antipathy toward "47 percent" of the electorate (if not a bit more), so it was reassuring to see two of its more prominent leaders offer a message of inclusion and uplift at a Jack Kemp Foundation dinner on Tuesday. Too bad that on the same day, Republicans were reverting to form in the Senate chamber. There, the late Mr. Kemp's 1996 top-of-ticket running-mate, Bob Dole - recently released from hospital care and assisted by wheelchair - was unable to coax sufficient GOP support for what should have been a no-brainer for members of a truly compassionate party: the Convention on the Rights of Persons With Disabilities.
NEWS
By Ron Smith | August 27, 2008
The first and only time I went to the national political conventions was in 1996 - first to San Diego for the GOP conclave, at which the elderly U.S. senator from Kansas, Bob Dole, was nominated to run against President Bill Clinton in his re-election bid. I remember that Mr. Dole was such a boring old politician that the Republicans were thrilled that he selected Jack Kemp, the former Buffalo Bills quarterback and proponent of "supply-side" economics, as...
NEWS
By DAN RODRICKS and DAN RODRICKS,dan.rodricks@baltsun.com | August 26, 2008
I won't be reading this column today; it was hard enough just to write it. This is the father-notes-little-boy-growing-up column that I fought off a dozen times. Nick's high school graduation was in June. I attended, of course, and found myself too melancholy - and too much in denial - to write about it in public. Saturday was take-the-first-child-to-college day. I resisted, with full self-consciousness, taking up this space and your time with my little bit of miserable joy - what my Portuguese ancestors called saudade, the mixture of feelings one experiences at the landmark events of life.
NEWS
By Douglas MacKinnon | June 2, 2008
Back in 1996, President Bill Clinton's re-election campaign spot-welded the highly unpopular Newt Gingrich to Mr. Clinton's Republican challenger, Sen. Bob Dole. From television commercials to radio ads to speeches, the Darth Vader of the House of Representatives was continually morphed into any image or mention of Mr. Dole - to the point where some Americans actually thought Mr. Gingrich was Mr. Dole's running mate, or at the very least his Svengali. Was a strategy that basically ignored policy and the pressing issues of the time in lieu of a superficial and misleading attack effective?
NEWS
By MICHAEL OLESKER | June 25, 1996
It's hard not to sneer at Bob Dole, who says prayers every night that America's voters have no memory. Imagine Dole demanding "the whole truth" about the Clinton White House and FBI files. Imagine Dole declaring, "I think it smells to high heaven. I remember Watergate." Dole had better hope nobody remembers Bob Dole during Watergate.Two decades ago, he was the guy who wanted America to kiss off that investigation. He stood with Richard Nixon until the bloody end. Now he wants to make odious comparisons.
NEWS
By Alice M. Rivlin | June 25, 1993
I HAVE such a longstanding respect for Sen. Bob Dole that I fantasize the old Bob Dole -- the responsible statesman -- will weigh back into the budget debate.He was one of the first Republicans to recognize that the towering Reagan deficits endangered the health of the economy.Ignoring the political risk, he stood up to his own president, who offered supply-side nostrums, blithely talking about "growing out the deficits" and minimizing their size by basing projections on rosy scenarios.The old Bob Dole cut through the malarkey.
BUSINESS
By MEREDITH COHN AND GWYNETH SHAW and MEREDITH COHN AND GWYNETH SHAW,SUN REPORTERS | March 9, 2006
After three weeks of absorbing heavy criticism, the companies involved in a deal that would shift work at six U.S. ports from a British-owned firm to one owned by the government of Dubai are building on their Washington lobbying effort with a high-powered public relations offensive in the port cities. Officials from P&O Ports North America Inc., a subsidiary of the British cargo company, made its first stop outside the entrance to Seagirt Marine Terminal yesterday, hours before a House panel voted to block the deal.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | April 10, 2005
Former Sen. Bob Dole, whose life was shaped by a devastating war injury, suffered a medical emergency earlier this year that doctors told him nearly claimed his life. Dole disclosed details of the episode for the first time in an epilogue to his new memoir, One Soldier's Story, which is published by HarperCollins and is to be released this week. "I was on the bedroom floor, with blood streaming from my left arm and right eye, and a sharp pain engulfing my left arm - the better one," Dole writes.
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