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By Peter Baker and Peter Baker,SUN STAFF | January 29, 1998
A decade ago, the boating industry was at a standstill, with sales of new and used boats as slow as the economy during the recession of the late 1980s. In the years since, according to marine industry analyses, boating has boomed.Last year, according to the National Marine Manufacturers Association, boat buyers in the U.S. spent a record $19.5 billion on all boating market-related purchases and services -- including a 10 percent dollar gain of $8.6 billion in new boat sales.NMMA members produce about 80 percent of U.S. boats, equipment and accessories.
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SPORTS
By Jonathan Munshaw, The Baltimore Sun and By Jonathan Munshaw, The Baltimore Sun | August 9, 2014
Liz Sweeney of Timonium used to race her kayak while living in New York City. At the time, Sweeney would practice in the Hudson River, though public access to waterways was hard to find. Now, she is able to get up early and take her kayak to Loch Raven Fishing Center in Baltimore County, as she did on a recent day. Although she no longer races, she still uses her kayak for exercise. Elsewhere at the fishing center that day, minutes after Sweeney got out of the water, Rick Warner of Carney came in on his fishing boat following a morning excursion.
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By Peter Baker and Peter Baker,Staff Writer | February 6, 1993
For close to 20 years, marine businesses boomed in Maryland and around the country. But in the late 1980s, the bottom fell out, and the boating industry is just starting to be refitted.The reason, of course, is money. Boating money is drawn from discretionary income, those dollars put aside for recreation.Those who have it, analysts and lenders say, are hesitant to spend it. Those who want to borrow it have had a hard time qualifying for loans.So the recession has hit the boating business harder than most.
NEWS
March 15, 2013
As someone involved in the boating industry, I applaud Gary Jobson for his recent commentary urging the Maryland General Assembly to adopt a cap on our state's boat excise tax ("Bring the boats back," March 8). In recent years, all of us have seen a decline in the number of high-priced vessels that are being registered in our state. That means fewer big boats to get serviced in our marinas and fewer big boats seeking to purchase fuel and other supplies. The result is less spending and fewer local jobs.
BUSINESS
By Peter Jensen and Peter Jensen,Anne Arundel Bureau of The Sun | December 30, 1990
ANNAPOLIS -- Thanks to the protection of federal bankruptcy court, Roger R. Ramsey was spared the ignominious chore of watching an auctioneer sell his marina to the highest bidder tomorrow.As it is, the Annapolis auction house will stay busy on the last day of 1990. Another foreclosed marina, Spa Creek Yacht Club in Eastport, is set to be auctioned in front of the Anne Arundel County Courthouse at 10 a.m.In the booming economy of the mid-1980s, the prospect that two valuable marinas would be auctioned off in a single day would have been about as likely as a tidal wave on the Chesapeake Bay. But in the midst of what one boating industry veteran calls an "economic depression," it's just another day on the waterfront.
NEWS
June 3, 1991
Boating enthusiasts who hope to repeal a federal luxury tax on new boats have formed a non-affiliated political action committee, the first for the struggling industry.Mick Blackistone, director of the Annapolis-based Marine Trades Association of Maryland, has enlisted 30 state marine trades associations and boat manufacturers and dealersto help overturn a 10 percent tax on new boats costing more than $100,000.The tax, part of a five-year federal deficit-reduction package, already has cost the state jobs, businesses and income generated by sales and income tax, said Blackistone, the Save Jobs in Boating PAC's volunteer chairman.
NEWS
March 15, 2013
As someone involved in the boating industry, I applaud Gary Jobson for his recent commentary urging the Maryland General Assembly to adopt a cap on our state's boat excise tax ("Bring the boats back," March 8). In recent years, all of us have seen a decline in the number of high-priced vessels that are being registered in our state. That means fewer big boats to get serviced in our marinas and fewer big boats seeking to purchase fuel and other supplies. The result is less spending and fewer local jobs.
NEWS
By Lorraine Mirabella and Lorraine Mirabella,Staff Writer | August 28, 1992
The chief lobbyist for Maryland's boating industry has left his post after 14 years to work as the director of state government relations for Chicago-based National Marine Manufacturers Association (NMMA).Mick Blackistone, who served as executive director of the Marine Trades Association of Maryland, is taking over a post in which he is to monitor proposed legislation, regulations and taxes that affect boat manufacturers in 15 key boating states in his new job."I have worked closely with the NMMA for over a decade," Mr. Blackistone said in an interview.
NEWS
By Jackie Powder and Jackie Powder,SUN STAFF | June 14, 2002
A Shady Side boat-building company has landed a contract worth between $4 million and $5 million to build a state-of-the-art, 85-foot high-speed power yacht for a Bethesda businessman. The commission is a coup for Russell Fabrication -- run by Ray and Ron Russell -- which beat out a South Florida boat builder for the job. According to the Russells, who are 38-year-old identical twins, the vessel would be the largest boat of its kind to be built in Maryland since the closing in 1973 of the Trumpy boatyard in Eastport.
NEWS
October 18, 1991
Using the U.S. Powerboat Show as a backdrop, Representative Tom McMillen, D-4th, and boating enthusiasts will protest the federal luxury tax on new boats tomorrow.McMillen, co-sponsor of measures to repeal the sales tax and the Coast Guard user fee, plans a 12:30 p.m. press conference at Annapolis City Dock.The congressman will be joined by David Broom of the National Marine Manufacturers Association, George Brown, director of the Yacht Architects and Brokers Association, boat owners and sellers and industry employees.
NEWS
March 14, 2013
How is it possible that boat registrations in Maryland are stagnant even as boating sales and registrations across the rest of the country are bouncing back from the national recession? I think that Gary Jobson hit the answer squarely by pointing out the impact of Maryland's excessively high boat excise tax ("Bring the boats back," March 8). By not being competitive with our neighboring states up and down the Atlantic Coast, it's clear that Maryland boat owners are choosing to register their vessels in other states to avoid our tax. And that means that all of the local spending and local jobs that typically are created to service local boats are going to other states.
NEWS
March 4, 2013
Maryland's boating industry suffered badly in the economic downturn and has yet to fully recover, so it's no surprise that many in the boat business are once again looking for help from Annapolis. Unfortunately, the latest proposal - to cap the vessel excise tax at $10,000 - could do more harm than good. That's not just some knock against millionaires and their yachts - although they would be the primary beneficiaries of such a tax policy. Since the excise tax is set at 5 percent, that means only boats worth more than $200,000 would be affected.
NEWS
March 12, 2012
Once again, we have our state legislature using scare tactics to justify more tax increases that we do not need ("Budget would slash education, police aid," March 6). They threaten to cut funding for essential police and fire services and the like if they don't raise taxes again and call their response to Gov.Martin O'Malley's budget a "Doomsday Budget. " Well, the real Doomsday Budget will more likely be what they pass. This is no time to mirror the mistakes made by other states and the federal government where spending is out of control.
NEWS
March 9, 2012
Your editorial stated the justification for the Gov.Martin O'Malley's proposed increase in boat registration fees that are higher for larger boats is that larger boats require deeper dredging and that large boat owners can afford the higher taxes "considering such boats cost as much as $3 million to purchase" ("High and dry," Feb. 23). Your comments suggest naivete of the boating industry, as well as not being factual. This excessive fee significantly impacts the middle class who own the smaller boats.
NEWS
February 22, 2012
One can hardly blame the boating public for feeling a bit of sticker shock at news that the Maryland Department of Natural Resources wants to triple registration fees for most boaters. The recession has hit the boating industry hard, gas prices are up, and the General Assembly is already considering a number of taxes and fees to balance the state's budget next year. But there's only one thing the legislature could do to Maryland boaters to make life on the water even worse, and that would be to do nothing at all. Like Odysseus, the DNR is trapped between Scylla and Charybdis with no pain-free choices available.
SPORTS
By Don Markus, The Baltimore Sun | October 8, 2011
Tired of getting beaten up on the basketball court or twisting the night - and your back - away lunging to get that low volley? Is playing 18 holes frustrating, but not invigorating enough to get the endorphins cranked? Does a walk around the neighborhood seem as old as the neighborhood? Try rowing - or, more precisely, sliding-seat rowing. Bill Palatore did, and it changed the way he looked at going out on the water. Since buying a sliding-seat rowing skiff about five years ago, Palatore and one of his neighbors in Annapolis venture onto Ridout Creek and Whitehall Bay about four mornings a week for about 90 minutes at a time.
NEWS
By Yeganeh June Torbati, The Baltimore Su | October 2, 2010
As doors open Thursday for the four-day U.S. Sailboat Show in Annapolis, organizers hope that the city — and the boating industry — can emerge from the storms that battered the city last week and the economic tempest that took its toll on one of the city's major industries. After a recession that has forced many avid boaters to opt for boat repairs in lieu of buying a new model, vendors are looking to the sailboat show and its sister powerboat show, both to be held over the next two weeks, to help boaters and vendors bounce back.
NEWS
By Patrick Tyler and Patrick Tyler,SUN STAFF | June 6, 2004
NORTH EAST - Cecil Community College will be the first community college in the country to offer an associate's degree in small craft and yacht design when the college implements its new maritime trades program in the fall semester. The program will be offered in conjunction with the Westlawn Institute of Marine Technology, an accredited distance-learning school, and the American Boat and Yacht Council, which sets guidelines for boat design and issues certification for the industry. Steven Webb, the dean of business, communication, technologies and work force development for Cecil Community College, will oversee the program.
NEWS
By Yeganeh June Torbati, The Baltimore Su | October 2, 2010
As doors open Thursday for the four-day U.S. Sailboat Show in Annapolis, organizers hope that the city — and the boating industry — can emerge from the storms that battered the city last week and the economic tempest that took its toll on one of the city's major industries. After a recession that has forced many avid boaters to opt for boat repairs in lieu of buying a new model, vendors are looking to the sailboat show and its sister powerboat show, both to be held over the next two weeks, to help boaters and vendors bounce back.
NEWS
By Childs Walker and Childs Walker,SUN STAFF | March 2, 2005
Anne Arundel County's charter boat operators plan to hold their first industry show this spring as part of an annual Annapolis festival that celebrates the city's maritime heritage. Boat owners said they hope the show, scheduled to feature 11 vessels, will debunk any notion that boats-for-hire serve only the rich. The area's charters range from lavish party cruises that cost thousands of dollars to simple afternoon rides that cost a few dollars a person, said Susan Hall, manager for the Marine Charter Industry Association.
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